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"(IPTC025 contains(ETC)) or (IPTC025 contains(FITTEST)) or (IPTC025 contains(Emergency Telecommunications Cluster))": 191 results 

 
Haiti, Jérémie (Grand'Anse), 10 October 2016  The World Food Programme (WFP) is providing humanitarian assistance after Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti on Tuesday (4 October). At least 300 people are known to have died – with the figure expected to rise – and some 300,000 need help.  WFP is deploying logistics and assessment teams to bring in relief and to determine the hurricane’s wider impact on the food and nutrition security of Haitians. This work is being done in coordination with the Government of Haiti and international agencies.  At the time the hurricane struck Haiti, WFP had already pre-positioned sufficient emergency supplies to feed up to 300,000 people for a month. Meanwhile in Cuba, WFP has stocks to feed more than 25,000 people for a month as part of government-led efforts.  Damaged or impassable roads and destroyed bridges connecting Port-au-Prince with the hurricane-hit areas are posing a challenge. The most affected areas are Grand’Anse, South and south-east departments. The towns of Les Cayes, Port Salut and Jérémie suffered severe flooding.   WFP is chartering a helicopter to transport humanitarian personnel and relief items to the affected areas. The logistics team is deploying six portable tent warehouses to support the humanitarian community’s relief efforts. Two of these units will be located in Les Cayes and Jérémie respectively.  In the Photo: ETC officer Karen Barsamian offload communications equipment from a WFP-chartered helicopter at Jeremie airstrip.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 4933.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 8027.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 8453.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7564.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
IRQ_20160818_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7379.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
IRQ_20160818_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 8801.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Julie Vander Wiel, Logistics Cluster Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
IRQ_20160818_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7825.00 kb
 
Iraq, Tikrit (Salah ad Din Governorate), 18 August 2016  With the Mosul offensive now underway, the ETC has taken action to ensure it is fully prepared in terms of equipment and staff, and that its contingency plans are up to date and communicated with partners and senior management. Rami Shakra, ETC Coordinator, carried out an assessment mission to Tikrit to assess which ETC services would be required and another member of the ETC team carried out an assessment mission to Zummar. Both Tikrit and Zummar are earmarked to become common operational areas for the Mosul operation.  In the Photo: Julie Vander Wiel, Logistics Cluster Coordinator in Iraq, on an assessment mission in Tikrit.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Al Bahbahani
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7510.00 kb
 
Nepal, Kathmandu, Tribhuvan International Airport, 02 May 2015  On 25 April at 11:56 am, a destructive earthquake of 7.8 magnitude hit Nepal with the epicentre about 60 km outside the Kathmandu Valley.  A total of 30 out of 75 districts of the country have been affected, the worst affected are Gorkha, Lamjung, Sindhupalchowk, Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, and Laltpur districts, across rural and urban areas. The Government has officially declared a state of emergency and asked for international humanitarian assistance.   The impact in Kathmandu includes collapsed buildings and walls, especially historical buildings in the city centre, but overall less damage than what was predicted. In the Kathmandu Valley, hospitals are overcrowded, running out of medicine, doctors and beds for the injured. Nepal’s oldest hospital, Bir Hospital, has been treating people on the street. The majority of the people are staying outside at night in order to avoid being injured from the aftershocks.   WFP has started emergency operations with staff from around the world by providing common services for the entire humanitarian community - from storage facilities to supporting the transportation of not only food, but other crucial relief items.  In the Photo: at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, WFP is operating a relief hub for the management and dispatch of the cargo flooding into the country. This Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) was opened last month as part of WFP’s emergency preparedness work with the government of Nepal, which has been focusing on preparing for such an emergency for several years now. As co-lead of the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster, WFP is also facilitating the humanitarian community’s communications systems.  WFP’s Executive Director, Ertharin Cousin, visited Nepal from 1 to 3 May 2015, where she held meetings with Emergency Relief Coordinator, Valerie Amos, and the EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, who were also in-country. The Executive Director met government authorities and WFP staff and humanitarians involved in relief efforts. She also flew across the affected areas to witness first-hand the extent of the  earthquake’s impact on the more remote locations.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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5760 x 3840 px 60.96 x 40.64 cm 11671.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Rob Buurveld
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5472 x 3648 px 57.91 x 38.61 cm 4979.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Rob Buurveld
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5472 x 3648 px 57.91 x 38.61 cm 4602.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Rob Buurveld
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5472 x 3648 px 57.91 x 38.61 cm 4775.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Rob Buurveld
NEP_20150504_W....JPG
3648 x 5472 px 38.61 x 57.91 cm 4490.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Rob Buurveld
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 57.91 x 38.61 cm 3609.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
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1944 x 2592 px 68.58 x 91.44 cm 1793.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
1944 x 2592 px 68.58 x 91.44 cm 1738.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
1944 x 2592 px 68.58 x 91.44 cm 1754.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
2592 x 1944 px 91.44 x 68.58 cm 1864.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
2592 x 1944 px 91.44 x 68.58 cm 1916.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
2592 x 1944 px 91.44 x 68.58 cm 1888.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
NEP_20150503_W....JPG
2592 x 1944 px 91.44 x 68.58 cm 1909.00 kb
 
Nepal, Gorkha, 3 May 2015  The Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) is a global network of organizations that work together to provide shared communications services in humanitarian emergencies. The ETC is one of the 11 clusters designated by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC).  Timely, predictable, and effective information and communications technology (ICT) services provided by the ETC support improved:  Response and coordination among humanitarian organizations Operational security environment for staff and assets Decision-making through timely access to critical information. Within 48 hours of a disaster, the ETC provides vital security communications services and voice and internet connectivity to assist the response community in their life-saving operations. Within four weeks, ETC services are expanded for continued emergency relief.  In the Photo: Close to five months after a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster (ETC) operation has transitioned its services as local services are fully restored. The ETC was initially activated to provide the humanitarian community in Nepal with shared internet connectivity and security telecommunications services.  The ETC demobilized its services in Gorkha and the Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) in Kathmandu on 28 September, and in Chautara and Charikot on 15 October. The extension of the VHF radio communication network is being handed over to United Nations Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS) in order to ensure continuity of long term services.  To those users who remain in Nepal, the ETC has provided support and advice on alternative and longer-term solutions, such as the use of local ISPs which are now restored in common operational areas.  Within the response timeframe, more than 1,550 humanitarians from over 250 organizations have registered to use ETC services in Nepal.  Photo: WFP/Mariko Hall
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2592 x 1944 px 91.44 x 68.58 cm 1938.00 kb
 
Nepal, Kathmandu, Tribhuvan International Airport, 28 April 2015  On 25 April at 11:56 am, a destructive earthquake of 7.8 magnitude hit Nepal with the epicentre about 60 km outside the Kathmandu Valley.  A total of 30 out of 75 districts of the country have been affected, the worst affected are Gorkha, Lamjung, Sindhupalchowk, Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, and Laltpur districts, across rural and urban areas. The Government has officially declared a state of emergency and asked for international humanitarian assistance.   The impact in Kathmandu includes collapsed buildings and walls, especially historical buildings in the city centre, but overall less damage than what was predicted. In the Kathmandu Valley, hospitals are overcrowded, running out of medicine, doctors and beds for the injured. Nepal’s oldest hospital, Bir Hospital, has been treating people on the street. The majority of the people are staying outside at night in order to avoid being injured from the aftershocks.   WFP has started emergency operations with staff from around the world by providing common services for the entire humanitarian community - from storage facilities to supporting the transportation of not only food, but other crucial relief items.  In the Photo: at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, WFP is operating a relief hub for the management and dispatch of the cargo flooding into the country. This Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) was opened last month as part of WFP’s emergency preparedness work with the government of Nepal, which has been focusing on preparing for such an emergency for several years now. As co-lead of the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster, WFP is also facilitating the humanitarian community’s communications systems.  In the Photo: The Fast Information Technology and Telecommunications Emergency and Support Team (FITTEST), is a group of technical specialists within the IT (information technology) division of  WFP. FITTEST provides IT, telecommunications and electricity infrastructure to support humanitarian aid operations anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Sujatro Ghosh
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Nepal, Kathmandu, Tribhuvan International Airport, 28 April 2015  On 25 April at 11:56 am, a destructive earthquake of 7.8 magnitude hit Nepal with the epicentre about 60 km outside the Kathmandu Valley.  A total of 30 out of 75 districts of the country have been affected, the worst affected are Gorkha, Lamjung, Sindhupalchowk, Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, and Laltpur districts, across rural and urban areas. The Government has officially declared a state of emergency and asked for international humanitarian assistance.   The impact in Kathmandu includes collapsed buildings and walls, especially historical buildings in the city centre, but overall less damage than what was predicted. In the Kathmandu Valley, hospitals are overcrowded, running out of medicine, doctors and beds for the injured. Nepal’s oldest hospital, Bir Hospital, has been treating people on the street. The majority of the people are staying outside at night in order to avoid being injured from the aftershocks.   WFP has started emergency operations with staff from around the world by providing common services for the entire humanitarian community - from storage facilities to supporting the transportation of not only food, but other crucial relief items.  In the Photo: at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, WFP is operating a relief hub for the management and dispatch of the cargo flooding into the country. This Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) was opened last month as part of WFP’s emergency preparedness work with the government of Nepal, which has been focusing on preparing for such an emergency for several years now. As co-lead of the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster, WFP is also facilitating the humanitarian community’s communications systems.  In the Photo: The Fast Information Technology and Telecommunications Emergency and Support Team (FITTEST), is a group of technical specialists within the IT (information technology) division of  WFP. FITTEST provides IT, telecommunications and electricity infrastructure to support humanitarian aid operations anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Sujatro Ghosh
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Nepal, Kathmandu, Tribhuvan International Airport, 26 April 2015  On 25 April at 11:56 am, a destructive earthquake of 7.8 magnitude hit Nepal with the epicentre about 60 km outside the Kathmandu Valley.  A total of 30 out of 75 districts of the country have been affected, the worst affected are Gorkha, Lamjung, Sindhupalchowk, Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, and Laltpur districts, across rural and urban areas. The Government has officially declared a state of emergency and asked for international humanitarian assistance.   The impact in Kathmandu includes collapsed buildings and walls, especially historical buildings in the city centre, but overall less damage than what was predicted. In the Kathmandu Valley, hospitals are overcrowded, running out of medicine, doctors and beds for the injured. Nepal’s oldest hospital, Bir Hospital, has been treating people on the street. The majority of the people are staying outside at night in order to avoid being injured from the aftershocks.   WFP has started emergency operations with staff from around the world by providing common services for the entire humanitarian community - from storage facilities to supporting the transportation of not only food, but other crucial relief items.  In the Photo: at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, WFP is operating a relief hub for the management and dispatch of the cargo flooding into the country. This Humanitarian Staging Area (HSA) was opened last month as part of WFP’s emergency preparedness work with the government of Nepal, which has been focusing on preparing for such an emergency for several years now. As co-lead of the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster, WFP is also facilitating the humanitarian community’s communications systems.  Photo: WFP/Baptiste Burgaud
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