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"(IPTC101 contains(Korea)) and (IPTC101 contains(democratic))": 739 results 

 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley visiting a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, 9 May 2018.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3203.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley visiting a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, 9 May 2018.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3484.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley visiting a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, 9 May 2018.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3549.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley visiting a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, 9 May 2018.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3223.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: meal preparation in a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, visited by the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley 9 May 2018.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
2432 x 3648 px 85.80 x 128.69 cm 3190.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.  “I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”   During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.   WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: meal preparation in a WFP-supported children’s nursery and Hasong Kindergarten in Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, visited by the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley 9 May 2018.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3982.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5234.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3920.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5227.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3138.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: WFP DPRK Country Director Darlene Tymo visits a WFP-supported nursery in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 4379.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf visits a WFP-supported nursery in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 2032.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf visits a WFP-supported nursery in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1904.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf visits a WFP-supported nursery in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
2000 x 3000 px 52.92 x 79.38 cm 1475.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: A visit to a WFP-supported fortified cereals factory in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1506.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: WFP DPRK Country Director Darlene Tymo and Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf visit a WFP-supported fortified cereals factory in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1658.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: Children read in class at a WFP-supported boarding school in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 3843.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Each month, WFP provides specialized nutritious food to around a million pregnant women, nursing mothers and children, helping to reduce acute and chronic malnutrition. These fortified foods include rice or maize flour with added protein, vitamins and minerals, which boost the micronutrients, fats and proteins in people’s daily diets. WFP also provides the same food supplies to nurseries, children’s hospitals and some primary schools.  In the photo: Children play sport at a WFP-supported boarding school in Chongjin.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Much of WFP’s work in DPR Korea focuses on providing food for the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. If key nutrients are missed in this window, it can have long-term effects on mental and physical development. In this country, almost a third of children under the age of five are too small for their age – a condition called stunting, which is caused by chronic malnutrition.  To fight malnutrition, WFP provides fortified biscuits and cereals to pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, and to children in nurseries, kindergartens, paediatric wards, and orphanages. WFP food rations include crucial micronutrients, fats, and proteins to benefit babies and young children. These fortified biscuits and cereals are locally produced in 11 Government-run factories around the country.  In DPR Korea, WFP aims to reach 650,000 children and women each month, in a total of 60 counties across nine provinces.   In the photo: WFP DPRK Country Director Darlene Tymo and Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf at the fortified biscuit factory in Chongjin. WFP's collaboration with the factory began in 2000, when WFP provided machinery, and production was started. These biscuits, fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, serve as a snack in children's institutions and were key to WFP's flood response.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1532.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Much of WFP’s work in DPR Korea focuses on providing food for the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. If key nutrients are missed in this window, it can have long-term effects on mental and physical development. In this country, almost a third of children under the age of five are too small for their age – a condition called stunting, which is caused by chronic malnutrition.  To fight malnutrition, WFP provides fortified biscuits and cereals to pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, and to children in nurseries, kindergartens, paediatric wards, and orphanages. WFP food rations include crucial micronutrients, fats, and proteins to benefit babies and young children. These fortified biscuits and cereals are locally produced in 11 Government-run factories around the country.  In DPR Korea, WFP aims to reach 650,000 children and women each month, in a total of 60 counties across nine provinces.   In the photo: Production at the fortified biscuit factory in Chongjin. WFP's collaboration with the factory began in 2000, when WFP provided machinery, and production was started. These biscuits, fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, serve as a snack in children's institutions and were key to WFP's flood response.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
DPRK_20160929_....JPG
3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1765.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Much of WFP’s work in DPR Korea focuses on providing food for the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. If key nutrients are missed in this window, it can have long-term effects on mental and physical development. In this country, almost a third of children under the age of five are too small for their age – a condition called stunting, which is caused by chronic malnutrition.  To fight malnutrition, WFP provides fortified biscuits and cereals to pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, and to children in nurseries, kindergartens, paediatric wards, and orphanages. WFP food rations include crucial micronutrients, fats, and proteins to benefit babies and young children. These fortified biscuits and cereals are locally produced in 11 Government-run factories around the country.  In DPR Korea, WFP aims to reach 650,000 children and women each month, in a total of 60 counties across nine provinces.   In the photo: Swedish Ambassador to DPRK H.E. Torkel Stiernlöf at the fortified biscuit factory in Chongjin. WFP's collaboration with the factory began in 2000, when WFP provided machinery, and production was started. These biscuits, fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, serve as a snack in children's institutions and were key to WFP's flood response.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
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3000 x 2000 px 79.38 x 52.92 cm 1798.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Chongjin, 29 September 2016  Much of WFP’s work in DPR Korea focuses on providing food for the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. If key nutrients are missed in this window, it can have long-term effects on mental and physical development. In this country, almost a third of children under the age of five are too small for their age – a condition called stunting, which is caused by chronic malnutrition.  To fight malnutrition, WFP provides fortified biscuits and cereals to pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, and to children in nurseries, kindergartens, paediatric wards, and orphanages. WFP food rations include crucial micronutrients, fats, and proteins to benefit babies and young children. These fortified biscuits and cereals are locally produced in 11 Government-run factories around the country.  In DPR Korea, WFP aims to reach 650,000 children and women each month, in a total of 60 counties across nine provinces.   In the photo: Freshly produced fortified biscuits are packed for distribution to young children and women in DPRK. WFP's collaboration with the fortified biscuit factory in Chongjin began in 2000, when WFP provided machinery, and production was started. These biscuits, fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, serve as a snack in children's institutions and were key to WFP's flood response.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
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2895 x 1930 px 24.51 x 16.34 cm 1253.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Musan County, 28 September 2016  Heavy flooding triggered by Typhoon Lionrock has destroyed homes, crops and gardens, and left thousands of families vulnerable in DPRK.   Musan County is one of the coldest places in DPRK, where winters plunge below -20 degrees celcius. In Musan County, a mudslide destroyed over 200 houses leaving only rubble behind. Some houses are still standing but their gardens are covered in mud. People have tried to salvage whatever is left. A number of tents and temporary shelters have already been erected. The Government has announced an ambitious push to construct 20,000 new houses before winter sets in at the end of October.   WFP managed to respond quickly in Musan and other affected counties, and immediately distributed fortified biscuits and soybeans to 143,000 people. The fortified biscuits served as a first emergency ration, while the soybeans lasted for about 30 days per family.   In the photo: A view of the destruction caused by floods in Musan County. In addition to food from WFP and other organisations, temporary shelter, blankets and kitchen sets were provided to families who lost all their belongings.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 1804.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Musan County, 28 September 2016  Heavy flooding triggered by Typhoon Lionrock has destroyed homes, crops and gardens, and left thousands of families vulnerable in DPRK.   Musan County is one of the coldest places in DPRK, where winters plunge below -20 degrees celcius. In Musan County, a mudslide destroyed over 200 houses leaving only rubble behind. Some houses are still standing but their gardens are covered in mud. People have tried to salvage whatever is left. A number of tents and temporary shelters have already been erected. The Government has announced an ambitious push to construct 20,000 new houses before winter sets in at the end of October.   WFP managed to respond quickly in Musan and other affected counties, and immediately distributed fortified biscuits and soybeans to 143,000 people. The fortified biscuits served as a first emergency ration, while the soybeans lasted for about 30 days per family.   In the photo: A view of the destruction caused by floods in Musan County. In addition to food from WFP and other organisations, temporary shelter, blankets and kitchen sets were provided to families who lost all their belongings.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 2292.00 kb
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, North Hamgyong Province, Musan County, 28 September 2016  Heavy flooding triggered by Typhoon Lionrock has destroyed homes, crops and gardens, and left thousands of families vulnerable in DPRK.   Musan County is one of the coldest places in DPRK, where winters plunge below -20 degrees celcius. In Musan County, a mudslide destroyed over 200 houses leaving only rubble behind. Some houses are still standing but their gardens are covered in mud. People have tried to salvage whatever is left. A number of tents and temporary shelters have already been erected. The Government has announced an ambitious push to construct 20,000 new houses before winter sets in at the end of October.   WFP managed to respond quickly in Musan and other affected counties, and immediately distributed fortified biscuits and soybeans to 143,000 people. The fortified biscuits served as a first emergency ration, while the soybeans lasted for about 30 days per family.   In the photo: A view of the destruction caused by floods in Musan County. In addition to food from WFP and other organisations, temporary shelter, blankets and kitchen sets were provided to families who lost all their belongings.  Photo: WFP/Colin Kampschoer
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 2210.00 kb

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