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"(IPTC101 contains(angola))": 297 results 

 
Angola August 2006    WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.   WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.    The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.    Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
2592 x 1944 px 36.58 x 27.43 cm 2755.00 kb
 
Angola August 2006  WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.  WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.  Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
2592 x 1944 px 36.58 x 27.43 cm 2682.00 kb
 
Angola August 2006  WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.  WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.  Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
2592 x 1944 px 36.58 x 27.43 cm 2778.00 kb
 
Angola August 2006  WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.  WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.  Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
1944 x 2592 px 27.43 x 36.58 cm 3367.00 kb
 
Angola August 2006  WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.  Bridge over River Mulondola, length about 38 m. Destroyed during the civil war it was rebuilt by WFP project using timber from local forests. WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.  Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
1600 x 1200 px 22.58 x 16.93 cm 1616.00 kb
 
Angola August 2006  WFP implemented a bridge building project in eastern Angola between 2005-2007. 16 bridges were built along the main road to Lumbala N'guimbo - opening up a huge part of Moxico province, which had been cut off for most of Angola's 27-year-long civil war. The road was heavily mined and all of its bridges were destroyed during the conflict.  WFP worked closely with the government and the demining NGO, Mines Advisory Group. The actual construction of the bridges was done by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  The project was funded by the EC, UK, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway.  Photo: WFP/Arnold Furrer
ANG_200608_WFP....jpg
2592 x 1944 px 36.58 x 27.43 cm 3644.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007    Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.    Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.     As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.     Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 8120.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007    Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.    Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.     As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.     Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7173.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007    Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.    Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.     As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.     Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6610.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007    Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.    Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.     As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.     Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6973.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 8187.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7997.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7629.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 5973.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6459.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7703.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7049.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 5969.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007    Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.    Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.     As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.     Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6994.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6614.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 6159.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7299.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 8041.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7792.00 kb
 
Angola, February 2007  Almost five years after the 27 year civil war ended, the resettlement process is almost over, although some refugees will still return this year. Returnees have come back to a country ravaged by the aftermath of war, riddled with landmines, offering limited opportunities for generating income and with little access to basic services. They also have little knowledge of local farming practices after decades away.  Health and education indicators remain among the worst in the world in spite of Angola's increasing revenues from its wealth of natural resources. Because of this wealth, donors have been reluctant to dedicate more money for the country.   As a result, dramatic shortfalls are again forcing WFP to further reduce the number of people it feeds (from about 450,000 in 2006) and the food rations it distributes. In fact, most of the resources WFP currently has in-country were carried over from the previous operation which ended on 31 March 2006. It has therefore been decided to limit the distribution of WFP commodities to three most at risk groups: malnourished children in feeding centres (15,000 beneficiaries); school feeding (150,000); and, returning, resettling refugees (48,625) through 2007.   Photo:WFP/Neil Brander
ANG_200702_WFP....jpg
3543 x 2363 px 30.00 x 20.01 cm 7097.00 kb

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