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"(IPTC101 contains(armenia))": 123 results 

 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4205.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4283.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4287.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4422.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4403.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5086.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4300.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4385.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4377.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4673.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   As some schools did not have kitchen and cafeteria facilities and were unable to serve hot meals, WFP introduced in 2012 locally produced vitamin-enriched fruit bars in such schools. The project does not only benefit school children, but has triggered an agricultural development process that benefits these communities as a whole.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4237.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 6857.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 6414.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5209.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5326.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5212.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5738.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4293.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 6031.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5332.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4139.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
ARM_20120503_W....JPG
4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5638.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4626.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 5446.00 kb
 
Armenia, Tavush administrative district, Aghavnavank Village, May 2012  The Government of Armenia has expressed strong interest in adopting school feeding as a productive safety net that will contribute to social and economic development. The project supports inclusive education policies to ensure that vulnerable children have access to quality schooling, and to foster attendance, retention and learning. It will help to reduce hunger and to achieve universal primary education in line with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) enabling children from poor rural areas to benefit fully from primary education. The project targets 50,000 primary schoolchildren in 700 schools in seven administrative districts. School meals are provided five days a week during the 180-day school year in the form of hot soup and fortified bread in two-thirds of the schools, and fortified fruit bars in schools where meals cannot be prepared. WFP food is supplemented with fruit and vegetables purchased by parent–teacher committees from local smallholder farmers to enhance nutritional value of the meals.   Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
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4288 x 2848 px 36.31 x 24.11 cm 4522.00 kb

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