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"(IPTC101 contains(bangladesh))": 6202 results 

 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 11 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh.  Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: Sahara Khatun (27 years) with one of her children, Tamana Bibi (1.5 months). Together with her husband, Nur Hossain, they have three children, Sadek (14), Jaber (8) and Tamana Bibi who is just 1.5 months.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7760.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 11 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh.  Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: Tamana Bibi (1.5 months). She lives with her mother, Sahara Khatun, her father Nur Hossain, and two siblings, Sadek (14), Jaber (8).  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6748.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 11 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh.  Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: Sahara Khatun (27 years) with one of her children, Tamana Bibi (1.5 months). Together with her husband, Nur Hossain, they have three children, Sadek (14), Jaber (8) and Tamana Bibi who is just 1.5 months.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6253 x 4169 px 220.59 x 147.07 cm 6433.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 11 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh.  Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: Sahara Khatun (27 years) with one of her children, Tamana Bibi (1.5 months). Together with her husband, Nur Hossain, they have three children, Sadek (14), Jaber (8) and Tamana Bibi who is just 1.5 months.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7007.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  In the Photo: Nurul Haque (28). “My name is Mohammad Nurul Haque Nuru, I am 28 years old. I live in Moricha, we are five brothers and three sisters. From the very beginning, when the influx started, I am involved with WFP to transport all the food items to people.   What have you witnessed at the beginning of the influx? How did it impact you?  When the Rohingyas started to come, in the early September, people who have witnessed everything; they know how the refugees came, how hungry they were—their lamentation. They were sitting beside the streets, lamenting and waiting for food. They were all sitting on the streets, they didn’t have any place to sat or eat their food, they were begging for food. Watching them, we could realize, how it might feel while starving, how a hungry person acts like. They had nothing, they were all drenched in rain waiting for food and shelter, wailing. How much they have suffered that they flew here, requires no explanation. My heart kept weeping for their miseries, I tried to help them as much as I could.   Once they came here, after lamenting for days, when WFP started to give them food, then I also joined to distribute WFP’s food item. When WFP was giving them food, I was there, from my side, I tried my best to help running the distribution properly. I drove the truck, and transport all the items, to save lives, and after seeing this, I feel so happy. After influx, people were starving for days, when WFP started to distribute food, I got the chance to be involved with WFP logistics to deliver the foods as a driver. From my side, I tried my best to help running the distribution properly. After getting the foods from WFP, many lives were saved from death, specially the children’s. Till now, when I transport the foods to them and see that no one is starving, I feel so content and proud. “  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6480.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5989 x 3993 px 211.28 x 140.86 cm 6593.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7614.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5863 x 3909 px 206.83 x 137.90 cm 5293.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  WFP upholds the Humanitarian Principles and ensures all interventions provide Safety, Dignity and Integrity to all beneficiaries. Porter service caters to the most vulnerable during food distribution. Women, disable people and children get accompanied by the porters to their home in needs. Following the heavy rains, more porters have been hired and every WFP Cooperating Partner now has standby porters.  In the Photo: Nur Hossain (55). "My name is Nur Hossain. We are a family of 10 members, I, my wife and our 2 sons and 6 daughters. We arrived in Bangladesh 2 days before Eid-ul-Adha. We came here empty handed, no money, no papers, clothes, a roof over our heads, nothing. We came here just to save my children’s lives, our lives. We ended up in Kutupalong camp. We were not fortunate to receive tools or any materials to build our shelter homes, but after 2-4 days, we received tents. We were living in temporary tent shelters. After 1.5-2 months, we received a sack of rice. Before that we were living our lives on people’s charity money, the Za’kaat people sent for us; that’s how I somehow took care of my sons and daughters.  People gave us old clothes, and other items which helped us find the initial footing, or else, we would have been completely helpless. Allah kept us alive. Whether we get to eat or not eat, whether we have a proper meal with curries or not, we somehow survived, Allah has helped us. After 1 month of living life in this way, we received tokens from WFP. Using that token, we could receive rice, lentils and oil. That’s all we are receiving, they are not giving us any cash. It’s very difficult for us to eat only that. Plus, I have to find money to buy clothes for my children as well.  My children fell sick suddenly and even when I go to the hospital, the two tablets of Paracetamol did not work. So what option do I have to address situations like this? I sell of some lentils or oil to buy some vegetables and attend to some of my children’s needs or they are very upset and do not stop crying. I have to afford curry food items, bring my children to hospitals, get them treated for different diseases, buy them medicines. I have come this far dealing with all these hurdles. It’s been 3 months that I joined WFP. Here, they are giving us BDT 250 as salary per day. So, we can work for 8-9 days during food distribution and in every 2 weeks of working we receive the monthly salary.  The fact that WFP hired us, because we are Rohingyas. They saw our sufferings and they showed great kindness by hiring us. Out of pure love for humanity, they hired us. This opportunity has made things so much better for us. They truly love us because they could have given this opportunity to local Bangladeshi people. They hired us because they acknowledge our endless sufferings, they felt our pain too. They saw we were helpless and they gave us a chance. And they are not making us work for free, they are paying us. And we are doing our job diligently in exchange of this. I had seen a lot of suffering; it was a dire situation. I went to people and begged for mercy. I went to our Majhi and asked him for guidance and he let me know about work opportunities at WFP. I am so glad that I joined.  Let me tell you, I have 8-10 mouths to feed in my family. And we need to buy spices, meat these items because how long can one keep having the same rice and lentils? Plus, we have problems, my family members fall sick. Then also, we need clothes to wear. Even if someone was willing to give us 2tk, I would work. Similarly, though this job pays less money, I need this job and I will continue. Who else is going to hire me? I Cannot find work anywhere else, and carry on with our lives as usual. So whatever little WFP is giving us, we are carrying on with our lives and they might increase our pay in the future, who knows.  However, this has been tremendously helpful. Because earlier we hardly had anything other than rice and lentil, now we can enjoy other meals. Maybe I still cannot buy 1kg of fish, or 100g of chili but I can afford half of this amount and bring for my family."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7387.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  WFP upholds the Humanitarian Principles and ensures all interventions provide Safety, Dignity and Integrity to all beneficiaries. Porter service caters to the most vulnerable during food distribution. Women, disable people and children get accompanied by the porters to their home in needs. Following the heavy rains, more porters have been hired and every WFP Cooperating Partner now has standby porters.  In the Photo: Nur Hossain (55), 2nd from left sitting.  "My name is Nur Hossain. We are a family of 10 members, I, my wife and our 2 sons and 6 daughters. We arrived in Bangladesh 2 days before Eid-ul-Adha. We came here empty handed, no money, no papers, clothes, a roof over our heads, nothing. We came here just to save my children’s lives, our lives. We ended up in Kutupalong camp. We were not fortunate to receive tools or any materials to build our shelter homes, but after 2-4 days, we received tents. We were living in temporary tent shelters. After 1.5-2 months, we received a sack of rice. Before that we were living our lives on people’s charity money, the Za’kaat people sent for us; that’s how I somehow took care of my sons and daughters.  People gave us old clothes, and other items which helped us find the initial footing, or else, we would have been completely helpless. Allah kept us alive. Whether we get to eat or not eat, whether we have a proper meal with curries or not, we somehow survived, Allah has helped us. After 1 month of living life in this way, we received tokens from WFP. Using that token, we could receive rice, lentils and oil. That’s all we are receiving, they are not giving us any cash. It’s very difficult for us to eat only that. Plus, I have to find money to buy clothes for my children as well.  My children fell sick suddenly and even when I go to the hospital, the two tablets of Paracetamol did not work. So what option do I have to address situations like this? I sell of some lentils or oil to buy some vegetables and attend to some of my children’s needs or they are very upset and do not stop crying. I have to afford curry food items, bring my children to hospitals, get them treated for different diseases, buy them medicines. I have come this far dealing with all these hurdles. It’s been 3 months that I joined WFP. Here, they are giving us BDT 250 as salary per day. So, we can work for 8-9 days during food distribution and in every 2 weeks of working we receive the monthly salary.  The fact that WFP hired us, because we are Rohingyas. They saw our sufferings and they showed great kindness by hiring us. Out of pure love for humanity, they hired us. This opportunity has made things so much better for us. They truly love us because they could have given this opportunity to local Bangladeshi people. They hired us because they acknowledge our endless sufferings, they felt our pain too. They saw we were helpless and they gave us a chance. And they are not making us work for free, they are paying us. And we are doing our job diligently in exchange of this. I had seen a lot of suffering; it was a dire situation. I went to people and begged for mercy. I went to our Majhi and asked him for guidance and he let me know about work opportunities at WFP. I am so glad that I joined.  Let me tell you, I have 8-10 mouths to feed in my family. And we need to buy spices, meat these items because how long can one keep having the same rice and lentils? Plus, we have problems, my family members fall sick. Then also, we need clothes to wear. Even if someone was willing to give us 2tk, I would work. Similarly, though this job pays less money, I need this job and I will continue. Who else is going to hire me? I Cannot find work anywhere else, and carry on with our lives as usual. So whatever little WFP is giving us, we are carrying on with our lives and they might increase our pay in the future, who knows.  However, this has been tremendously helpful. Because earlier we hardly had anything other than rice and lentil, now we can enjoy other meals. Maybe I still cannot buy 1kg of fish, or 100g of chili but I can afford half of this amount and bring for my family."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180709_W....JPG
6344 x 4229 px 223.80 x 149.19 cm 7966.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  WFP upholds the Humanitarian Principles and ensures all interventions provide Safety, Dignity and Integrity to all beneficiaries. Porter service caters to the most vulnerable during food distribution. Women, disable people and children get accompanied by the porters to their home in needs. Following the heavy rains, more porters have been hired and every WFP Cooperating Partner now has standby porters.  In the Photo: Nur Hossain (55). "My name is Nur Hossain. We are a family of 10 members, I, my wife and our 2 sons and 6 daughters. We arrived in Bangladesh 2 days before Eid-ul-Adha. We came here empty handed, no money, no papers, clothes, a roof over our heads, nothing. We came here just to save my children’s lives, our lives. We ended up in Kutupalong camp. We were not fortunate to receive tools or any materials to build our shelter homes, but after 2-4 days, we received tents. We were living in temporary tent shelters. After 1.5-2 months, we received a sack of rice. Before that we were living our lives on people’s charity money, the Za’kaat people sent for us; that’s how I somehow took care of my sons and daughters.  People gave us old clothes, and other items which helped us find the initial footing, or else, we would have been completely helpless. Allah kept us alive. Whether we get to eat or not eat, whether we have a proper meal with curries or not, we somehow survived, Allah has helped us. After 1 month of living life in this way, we received tokens from WFP. Using that token, we could receive rice, lentils and oil. That’s all we are receiving, they are not giving us any cash. It’s very difficult for us to eat only that. Plus, I have to find money to buy clothes for my children as well.  My children fell sick suddenly and even when I go to the hospital, the two tablets of Paracetamol did not work. So what option do I have to address situations like this? I sell of some lentils or oil to buy some vegetables and attend to some of my children’s needs or they are very upset and do not stop crying. I have to afford curry food items, bring my children to hospitals, get them treated for different diseases, buy them medicines. I have come this far dealing with all these hurdles. It’s been 3 months that I joined WFP. Here, they are giving us BDT 250 as salary per day. So, we can work for 8-9 days during food distribution and in every 2 weeks of working we receive the monthly salary.  The fact that WFP hired us, because we are Rohingyas. They saw our sufferings and they showed great kindness by hiring us. Out of pure love for humanity, they hired us. This opportunity has made things so much better for us. They truly love us because they could have given this opportunity to local Bangladeshi people. They hired us because they acknowledge our endless sufferings, they felt our pain too. They saw we were helpless and they gave us a chance. And they are not making us work for free, they are paying us. And we are doing our job diligently in exchange of this. I had seen a lot of suffering; it was a dire situation. I went to people and begged for mercy. I went to our Majhi and asked him for guidance and he let me know about work opportunities at WFP. I am so glad that I joined.  Let me tell you, I have 8-10 mouths to feed in my family. And we need to buy spices, meat these items because how long can one keep having the same rice and lentils? Plus, we have problems, my family members fall sick. Then also, we need clothes to wear. Even if someone was willing to give us 2tk, I would work. Similarly, though this job pays less money, I need this job and I will continue. Who else is going to hire me? I Cannot find work anywhere else, and carry on with our lives as usual. So whatever little WFP is giving us, we are carrying on with our lives and they might increase our pay in the future, who knows.  However, this has been tremendously helpful. Because earlier we hardly had anything other than rice and lentil, now we can enjoy other meals. Maybe I still cannot buy 1kg of fish, or 100g of chili but I can afford half of this amount and bring for my family."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180709_W....JPG
5800 x 3867 px 204.61 x 136.42 cm 5166.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  WFP upholds the Humanitarian Principles and ensures all interventions provide Safety, Dignity and Integrity to all beneficiaries. Porter service caters to the most vulnerable during food distribution. Women, disable people and children get accompanied by the porters to their home in needs. Following the heavy rains, more porters have been hired and every WFP Cooperating Partner now has standby porters.  In the Photo: Nur Hossain (55). "My name is Nur Hossain. We are a family of 10 members, I, my wife and our 2 sons and 6 daughters. We arrived in Bangladesh 2 days before Eid-ul-Adha. We came here empty handed, no money, no papers, clothes, a roof over our heads, nothing. We came here just to save my children’s lives, our lives. We ended up in Kutupalong camp. We were not fortunate to receive tools or any materials to build our shelter homes, but after 2-4 days, we received tents. We were living in temporary tent shelters. After 1.5-2 months, we received a sack of rice. Before that we were living our lives on people’s charity money, the Za’kaat people sent for us; that’s how I somehow took care of my sons and daughters.  People gave us old clothes, and other items which helped us find the initial footing, or else, we would have been completely helpless. Allah kept us alive. Whether we get to eat or not eat, whether we have a proper meal with curries or not, we somehow survived, Allah has helped us. After 1 month of living life in this way, we received tokens from WFP. Using that token, we could receive rice, lentils and oil. That’s all we are receiving, they are not giving us any cash. It’s very difficult for us to eat only that. Plus, I have to find money to buy clothes for my children as well.  My children fell sick suddenly and even when I go to the hospital, the two tablets of Paracetamol did not work. So what option do I have to address situations like this? I sell of some lentils or oil to buy some vegetables and attend to some of my children’s needs or they are very upset and do not stop crying. I have to afford curry food items, bring my children to hospitals, get them treated for different diseases, buy them medicines. I have come this far dealing with all these hurdles. It’s been 3 months that I joined WFP. Here, they are giving us BDT 250 as salary per day. So, we can work for 8-9 days during food distribution and in every 2 weeks of working we receive the monthly salary.  The fact that WFP hired us, because we are Rohingyas. They saw our sufferings and they showed great kindness by hiring us. Out of pure love for humanity, they hired us. This opportunity has made things so much better for us. They truly love us because they could have given this opportunity to local Bangladeshi people. They hired us because they acknowledge our endless sufferings, they felt our pain too. They saw we were helpless and they gave us a chance. And they are not making us work for free, they are paying us. And we are doing our job diligently in exchange of this. I had seen a lot of suffering; it was a dire situation. I went to people and begged for mercy. I went to our Majhi and asked him for guidance and he let me know about work opportunities at WFP. I am so glad that I joined.  Let me tell you, I have 8-10 mouths to feed in my family. And we need to buy spices, meat these items because how long can one keep having the same rice and lentils? Plus, we have problems, my family members fall sick. Then also, we need clothes to wear. Even if someone was willing to give us 2tk, I would work. Similarly, though this job pays less money, I need this job and I will continue. Who else is going to hire me? I Cannot find work anywhere else, and carry on with our lives as usual. So whatever little WFP is giving us, we are carrying on with our lives and they might increase our pay in the future, who knows.  However, this has been tremendously helpful. Because earlier we hardly had anything other than rice and lentil, now we can enjoy other meals. Maybe I still cannot buy 1kg of fish, or 100g of chili but I can afford half of this amount and bring for my family."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180709_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7575.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  Refugees receiving e-voucher assistance are able to use their Assistance Cards at 18 outlets to access food including fresh vegetables, spices, dried fish, eggs, pulses and rice. It is recharged every month to provide more flexibility, choice and dignity to the refugees. WFP is planning 33 additional e- voucher outlets by March 2019. Gradually all refugees will be transitioned from in-kind food distributions to e-vouchers.  In the Photo: Senowara Begum. "My name is Senowara Begum and my husband is Abul hashim. My eldest daughter is Somira begum, then my son named Mohammed Idris, then Mohammed Yunus, Jamal, Kamal, my step daughter Sofera Begum and the youngest is Shahab Uddin.   It’s been a year I came to Bangladesh. Life immediately after arrival, was extremely difficult-we didn’t have a house, we spent days under the sky, slept on the ground. we were all dying in hunger, we were thirsty. My children were tired crying and we were tired of the chaos. My babies caught different diseases, they were suffering from diarrhoea for 7 days. It was really challenging, but Allah still helped us survive. Allah paid heed to our prayers and bestowed us his mercy in form of the food card. In the beginning, I received rice and other items from WFP. Now we have our food card thorough which we can access food easily, Allah has made sure we get food and we live. I do my grocery shopping, buy rice with the food card and that’s how my family gets food.   In the beginning, it was so distressing. We used to receive 30kg rice, and 30 litre oil twice a month. In total, 60kg of each and an amount of lentil. We somehow managed with that food but who would want to eat the same thing daily? When I received my new food card through E-voucher, this food card is giving us rice, vegetable and other food items. This has been super helpful for us. We are very happy. Before getting the assistance card, I only received 3 food items, and now I can buy from 19 food items. Chilies, oil, turmeric, garlic, salt, dried fishes, being able to buy all these 19 items makes me feel really happy.  I cannot walk properly. I was shot in Burma and my family had to spend an amount of 50,000 for my treatment and I still cannot walk as before. I also have stomach disease so I cannot eat properly. I feel a burning sensation when I eat, it’s like my ribs are being pulled apart. That’s why I feel ill all the time.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180709_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6344.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  Refugees receiving e-voucher assistance are able to use their Assistance Cards at 18 outlets to access food including fresh vegetables, spices, dried fish, eggs, pulses and rice. It is recharged every month to provide more flexibility, choice and dignity to the refugees. WFP is planning 33 additional e- voucher outlets by March 2019. Gradually all refugees will be transitioned from in-kind food distributions to e-vouchers.  In the Photo: Senowara Begum. "My name is Senowara Begum and my husband is Abul hashim. My eldest daughter is Somira begum, then my son named Mohammed Idris, then Mohammed Yunus, Jamal, Kamal, my step daughter Sofera Begum and the youngest is Shahab Uddin.   It’s been a year I came to Bangladesh. Life immediately after arrival, was extremely difficult-we didn’t have a house, we spent days under the sky, slept on the ground. we were all dying in hunger, we were thirsty. My children were tired crying and we were tired of the chaos. My babies caught different diseases, they were suffering from diarrhoea for 7 days. It was really challenging, but Allah still helped us survive. Allah paid heed to our prayers and bestowed us his mercy in form of the food card. In the beginning, I received rice and other items from WFP. Now we have our food card thorough which we can access food easily, Allah has made sure we get food and we live. I do my grocery shopping, buy rice with the food card and that’s how my family gets food.   In the beginning, it was so distressing. We used to receive 30kg rice, and 30 litre oil twice a month. In total, 60kg of each and an amount of lentil. We somehow managed with that food but who would want to eat the same thing daily? When I received my new food card through E-voucher, this food card is giving us rice, vegetable and other food items. This has been super helpful for us. We are very happy. Before getting the assistance card, I only received 3 food items, and now I can buy from 19 food items. Chilies, oil, turmeric, garlic, salt, dried fishes, being able to buy all these 19 items makes me feel really happy.  I cannot walk properly. I was shot in Burma and my family had to spend an amount of 50,000 for my treatment and I still cannot walk as before. I also have stomach disease so I cannot eat properly. I feel a burning sensation when I eat, it’s like my ribs are being pulled apart. That’s why I feel ill all the time.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6204.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 09 July 2018  Refugees receiving e-voucher assistance are able to use their Assistance Cards at 18 outlets to access food including fresh vegetables, spices, dried fish, eggs, pulses and rice. It is recharged every month to provide more flexibility, choice and dignity to the refugees. WFP is planning 33 additional e- voucher outlets by March 2019. Gradually all refugees will be transitioned from in-kind food distributions to e-vouchers.  In the Photo: Senowara Begum. "My name is Senowara Begum and my husband is Abul hashim. My eldest daughter is Somira begum, then my son named Mohammed Idris, then Mohammed Yunus, Jamal, Kamal, my step daughter Sofera Begum and the youngest is Shahab Uddin.   It’s been a year I came to Bangladesh. Life immediately after arrival, was extremely difficult-we didn’t have a house, we spent days under the sky, slept on the ground. we were all dying in hunger, we were thirsty. My children were tired crying and we were tired of the chaos. My babies caught different diseases, they were suffering from diarrhoea for 7 days. It was really challenging, but Allah still helped us survive. Allah paid heed to our prayers and bestowed us his mercy in form of the food card. In the beginning, I received rice and other items from WFP. Now we have our food card thorough which we can access food easily, Allah has made sure we get food and we live. I do my grocery shopping, buy rice with the food card and that’s how my family gets food.   In the beginning, it was so distressing. We used to receive 30kg rice, and 30 litre oil twice a month. In total, 60kg of each and an amount of lentil. We somehow managed with that food but who would want to eat the same thing daily? When I received my new food card through E-voucher, this food card is giving us rice, vegetable and other food items. This has been super helpful for us. We are very happy. Before getting the assistance card, I only received 3 food items, and now I can buy from 19 food items. Chilies, oil, turmeric, garlic, salt, dried fishes, being able to buy all these 19 items makes me feel really happy.  I cannot walk properly. I was shot in Burma and my family had to spend an amount of 50,000 for my treatment and I still cannot walk as before. I also have stomach disease so I cannot eat properly. I feel a burning sensation when I eat, it’s like my ribs are being pulled apart. That’s why I feel ill all the time.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6149 x 4099 px 216.92 x 144.60 cm 6099.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 07 July 2018  WFP will continue to provide GFDs until the entire refugee population has transitioned to e-vouchers. The ration consists of 30kg rice, 9kg pulses, and 3 litres of vegetable oil. Small families (1-3 members) receive one ration per month, medium families (4-7 members) receive two rations per month (in 15-day cycles), and large families (8+ members) receive four rations per month (in 15-day cycles). 18th round General Food Assistance was completed on 30 June and has reached 100,349 families.  In the Photo: Nur banu (45) with one of her daughters. "My name is Nur Banu and I am 45 years old. During the massacre in Myanmar, I lost my husband. We could not see who was around us, we did not know what was going to happen, we just ran off. In our family, there are 5 women and 1 man; and one of my daughter’s is mentally unstable. I got the WFP card with help from our Majhi. I went to him and he helped me to get it. But I am still only receiving the rice, lentil and oil. That’s all. I am happy that we are receiving rice, lentils and oil. But we are not receiving chili, salt. That becomes a great problem for us. The firewood people give is, it is not enough. Life becomes really hard then. We are in a lot of pain but what can we do? We have to go on living our lives. I want to buy betel leaf, betel nut, vegetables. We never buy meat or fish. We also need to buy clothes. We depend on whatever piece of cloth people sent for us, torn or not, we wear them. I don’t have any money. So if I want to eat two meals a day, I have to cook without salt. That’s how challenging life is here, we just don’t have any money. Where can I find the money I need to attend to my needs. If I go to buy fish, it costs me 200-300tk. Everything has a price. I wish I had the financial support. We are getting the rice and have a full platter but my biggest worry is about my mentally challenged daughter. I don’t have any money. She loses her calm and beats me. There is no soap. Many people received it but I did not. I asked for it a lot for my mentally challenged daughter but could not find anything. We are in a lot of trouble. We are just living this life somehow."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 5392.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 07 July 2018  WFP will continue to provide GFDs until the entire refugee population has transitioned to e-vouchers. The ration consists of 30kg rice, 9kg pulses, and 3 litres of vegetable oil. Small families (1-3 members) receive one ration per month, medium families (4-7 members) receive two rations per month (in 15-day cycles), and large families (8+ members) receive four rations per month (in 15-day cycles). 18th round General Food Assistance was completed on 30 June and has reached 100,349 families.  In the Photo: Nur banu (45) with one of her daughters. "My name is Nur Banu and I am 45 years old. During the massacre in Myanmar, I lost my husband. We could not see who was around us, we did not know what was going to happen, we just ran off. In our family, there are 5 women and 1 man; and one of my daughter’s is mentally unstable. I got the WFP card with help from our Majhi. I went to him and he helped me to get it. But I am still only receiving the rice, lentil and oil. That’s all. I am happy that we are receiving rice, lentils and oil. But we are not receiving chili, salt. That becomes a great problem for us. The firewood people give is, it is not enough. Life becomes really hard then. We are in a lot of pain but what can we do? We have to go on living our lives. I want to buy betel leaf, betel nut, vegetables. We never buy meat or fish. We also need to buy clothes. We depend on whatever piece of cloth people sent for us, torn or not, we wear them. I don’t have any money. So if I want to eat two meals a day, I have to cook without salt. That’s how challenging life is here, we just don’t have any money. Where can I find the money I need to attend to my needs. If I go to buy fish, it costs me 200-300tk. Everything has a price. I wish I had the financial support. We are getting the rice and have a full platter but my biggest worry is about my mentally challenged daughter. I don’t have any money. She loses her calm and beats me. There is no soap. Many people received it but I did not. I asked for it a lot for my mentally challenged daughter but could not find anything. We are in a lot of trouble. We are just living this life somehow."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6472.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 07 July 2018  WFP will continue to provide GFDs until the entire refugee population has transitioned to e-vouchers. The ration consists of 30kg rice, 9kg pulses, and 3 litres of vegetable oil. Small families (1-3 members) receive one ration per month, medium families (4-7 members) receive two rations per month (in 15-day cycles), and large families (8+ members) receive four rations per month (in 15-day cycles). 18th round General Food Assistance was completed on 30 June and has reached 100,349 families.  In the Photo: Nur banu (45) with one of her daughters. "My name is Nur Banu and I am 45 years old. During the massacre in Myanmar, I lost my husband. We could not see who was around us, we did not know what was going to happen, we just ran off. In our family, there are 5 women and 1 man; and one of my daughter’s is mentally unstable. I got the WFP card with help from our Majhi. I went to him and he helped me to get it. But I am still only receiving the rice, lentil and oil. That’s all. I am happy that we are receiving rice, lentils and oil. But we are not receiving chili, salt. That becomes a great problem for us. The firewood people give is, it is not enough. Life becomes really hard then. We are in a lot of pain but what can we do? We have to go on living our lives. I want to buy betel leaf, betel nut, vegetables. We never buy meat or fish. We also need to buy clothes. We depend on whatever piece of cloth people sent for us, torn or not, we wear them. I don’t have any money. So if I want to eat two meals a day, I have to cook without salt. That’s how challenging life is here, we just don’t have any money. Where can I find the money I need to attend to my needs. If I go to buy fish, it costs me 200-300tk. Everything has a price. I wish I had the financial support. We are getting the rice and have a full platter but my biggest worry is about my mentally challenged daughter. I don’t have any money. She loses her calm and beats me. There is no soap. Many people received it but I did not. I asked for it a lot for my mentally challenged daughter but could not find anything. We are in a lot of trouble. We are just living this life somehow."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5919 x 3946 px 208.81 x 139.21 cm 5691.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 07 July 2018  WFP will continue to provide GFDs until the entire refugee population has transitioned to e-vouchers. The ration consists of 30kg rice, 9kg pulses, and 3 litres of vegetable oil. Small families (1-3 members) receive one ration per month, medium families (4-7 members) receive two rations per month (in 15-day cycles), and large families (8+ members) receive four rations per month (in 15-day cycles). 18th round General Food Assistance was completed on 30 June and has reached 100,349 families.  In the Photo: Nur banu (45). "My name is Nur Banu and I am 45 years old. During the massacre in Myanmar, I lost my husband. We could not see who was around us, we did not know what was going to happen, we just ran off. In our family, there are 5 women and 1 man; and one of my daughter’s is mentally unstable. I got the WFP card with help from our Majhi. I went to him and he helped me to get it. But I am still only receiving the rice, lentil and oil. That’s all. I am happy that we are receiving rice, lentils and oil. But we are not receiving chili, salt. That becomes a great problem for us. The firewood people give is, it is not enough. Life becomes really hard then. We are in a lot of pain but what can we do? We have to go on living our lives. I want to buy betel leaf, betel nut, vegetables. We never buy meat or fish. We also need to buy clothes. We depend on whatever piece of cloth people sent for us, torn or not, we wear them. I don’t have any money. So if I want to eat two meals a day, I have to cook without salt. That’s how challenging life is here, we just don’t have any money. Where can I find the money I need to attend to my needs. If I go to buy fish, it costs me 200-300tk. Everything has a price. I wish I had the financial support. We are getting the rice and have a full platter but my biggest worry is about my mentally challenged daughter. I don’t have any money. She loses her calm and beats me. There is no soap. Many people received it but I did not. I asked for it a lot for my mentally challenged daughter but could not find anything. We are in a lot of trouble. We are just living this life somehow."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6135 x 4090 px 216.43 x 144.29 cm 7132.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 07 July 2018  WFP will continue to provide GFDs until the entire refugee population has transitioned to e-vouchers. The ration consists of 30kg rice, 9kg pulses, and 3 litres of vegetable oil. Small families (1-3 members) receive one ration per month, medium families (4-7 members) receive two rations per month (in 15-day cycles), and large families (8+ members) receive four rations per month (in 15-day cycles). 18th round General Food Assistance was completed on 30 June and has reached 100,349 families.  In the Photo: Nur banu (45). "My name is Nur Banu and I am 45 years old. During the massacre in Myanmar, I lost my husband. We could not see who was around us, we did not know what was going to happen, we just ran off. In our family, there are 5 women and 1 man; and one of my daughter’s is mentally unstable. I got the WFP card with help from our Majhi. I went to him and he helped me to get it. But I am still only receiving the rice, lentil and oil. That’s all. I am happy that we are receiving rice, lentils and oil. But we are not receiving chili, salt. That becomes a great problem for us. The firewood people give is, it is not enough. Life becomes really hard then. We are in a lot of pain but what can we do? We have to go on living our lives. I want to buy betel leaf, betel nut, vegetables. We never buy meat or fish. We also need to buy clothes. We depend on whatever piece of cloth people sent for us, torn or not, we wear them. I don’t have any money. So if I want to eat two meals a day, I have to cook without salt. That’s how challenging life is here, we just don’t have any money. Where can I find the money I need to attend to my needs. If I go to buy fish, it costs me 200-300tk. Everything has a price. I wish I had the financial support. We are getting the rice and have a full platter but my biggest worry is about my mentally challenged daughter. I don’t have any money. She loses her calm and beats me. There is no soap. Many people received it but I did not. I asked for it a lot for my mentally challenged daughter but could not find anything. We are in a lot of trouble. We are just living this life somehow."  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5947 x 3965 px 209.80 x 139.88 cm 5724.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 03 July 2018  WFP implements disaster risk reduction through Cash for Work, where vulnerable male and female refugees and host community members according to their interest and ability are engaged in community-based infrastructure rehabilitation and risk mitigation activities. Key activities include improving access to the mega camp via foot trails, feeder roads, improving drainage channels and outlets, site stabilisation and other site works in support of the Site Management Sector. Over 27,000 participants (10% female) have so far been engaged in DRR activities.  In the Photo: Faruq (20). “I am Faruq, I am 20 years old. I have 8 members in my family.  When we first came here, we  did not have any shelter to take refuge, no clothes, nothing. I did not have anything with me, everything was taken by the Mog (Burmese), money, gold, silver, all our properties. Our houses, everything, they burnt all our properties, and took everything. We mostly suffered for the food, we starved, we did not have any place to stay. Muslim brothers helped us to get food, and be energized, they made shelters for us to live. Since they gave us the bamboos for the shelters, we can now reside somewhere, we have a place to stay. By the mercy of Allah, we are getting the rations but the quantity is improper. Twice a month they are giving the ration but the quantity is not enough, sometimes we want to eat vegetables and fishes but we do not have money. If we do not have money, how can we buy them? Now, I got a job with WFP, a seven days’ contract. Recently I have worked for seven days, got the money, and they are all finished. I could survive with that money for three- four days. I will search for work in other places, if I can get something, it’s great, if not, then I will have to survive on the pulses.  After coming here, for two- three months we had to suffer a lot. After suffering for a few months, through donations we started to get foods. WFP is building a road near to the GFD points, from where we get the rice, they take people on a seven day’s contract. I am working there for seven days, and with those money, I usually do the grocery shopping for my family. But the money I get finishes within two- three days, so I try to find another job. If I get one, I work, otherwise not. All our fellow brothers work for seven days by rotation, if I work for seven days, another person will work next work then someone else. Sometimes the rice was not enough, it was insufficient. If I work, then I have some money, otherwise, we make daal from the pulses we get. However, with WFP, I did not face any problem for payment, we work accordingly and they make our payments on time. After seven days of work, they pay us the money. They never create any problem for us.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7009.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 03 July 2018  WFP implements disaster risk reduction through Cash for Work, where vulnerable male and female refugees and host community members according to their interest and ability are engaged in community-based infrastructure rehabilitation and risk mitigation activities. Key activities include improving access to the mega camp via foot trails, feeder roads, improving drainage channels and outlets, site stabilisation and other site works in support of the Site Management Sector. Over 27,000 participants (10% female) have so far been engaged in DRR activities.  In the Photo: Faruq (20). “I am Faruq, I am 20 years old. I have 8 members in my family.  When we first came here, we  did not have any shelter to take refuge, no clothes, nothing. I did not have anything with me, everything was taken by the Mog (Burmese), money, gold, silver, all our properties. Our houses, everything, they burnt all our properties, and took everything. We mostly suffered for the food, we starved, we did not have any place to stay. Muslim brothers helped us to get food, and be energized, they made shelters for us to live. Since they gave us the bamboos for the shelters, we can now reside somewhere, we have a place to stay. By the mercy of Allah, we are getting the rations but the quantity is improper. Twice a month they are giving the ration but the quantity is not enough, sometimes we want to eat vegetables and fishes but we do not have money. If we do not have money, how can we buy them? Now, I got a job with WFP, a seven days’ contract. Recently I have worked for seven days, got the money, and they are all finished. I could survive with that money for three- four days. I will search for work in other places, if I can get something, it’s great, if not, then I will have to survive on the pulses.  After coming here, for two- three months we had to suffer a lot. After suffering for a few months, through donations we started to get foods. WFP is building a road near to the GFD points, from where we get the rice, they take people on a seven day’s contract. I am working there for seven days, and with those money, I usually do the grocery shopping for my family. But the money I get finishes within two- three days, so I try to find another job. If I get one, I work, otherwise not. All our fellow brothers work for seven days by rotation, if I work for seven days, another person will work next work then someone else. Sometimes the rice was not enough, it was insufficient. If I work, then I have some money, otherwise, we make daal from the pulses we get. However, with WFP, I did not face any problem for payment, we work accordingly and they make our payments on time. After seven days of work, they pay us the money. They never create any problem for us.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6520.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 03 July 2018  WFP implements disaster risk reduction through Cash for Work, where vulnerable male and female refugees and host community members according to their interest and ability are engaged in community-based infrastructure rehabilitation and risk mitigation activities. Key activities include improving access to the mega camp via foot trails, feeder roads, improving drainage channels and outlets, site stabilisation and other site works in support of the Site Management Sector. Over 27,000 participants (10% female) have so far been engaged in DRR activities.  In the Photo: Faruq (20). “I am Faruq, I am 20 years old. I have 8 members in my family.  When we first came here, we  did not have any shelter to take refuge, no clothes, nothing. I did not have anything with me, everything was taken by the Mog (Burmese), money, gold, silver, all our properties. Our houses, everything, they burnt all our properties, and took everything. We mostly suffered for the food, we starved, we did not have any place to stay. Muslim brothers helped us to get food, and be energized, they made shelters for us to live. Since they gave us the bamboos for the shelters, we can now reside somewhere, we have a place to stay. By the mercy of Allah, we are getting the rations but the quantity is improper. Twice a month they are giving the ration but the quantity is not enough, sometimes we want to eat vegetables and fishes but we do not have money. If we do not have money, how can we buy them? Now, I got a job with WFP, a seven days’ contract. Recently I have worked for seven days, got the money, and they are all finished. I could survive with that money for three- four days. I will search for work in other places, if I can get something, it’s great, if not, then I will have to survive on the pulses.  After coming here, for two- three months we had to suffer a lot. After suffering for a few months, through donations we started to get foods. WFP is building a road near to the GFD points, from where we get the rice, they take people on a seven day’s contract. I am working there for seven days, and with those money, I usually do the grocery shopping for my family. But the money I get finishes within two- three days, so I try to find another job. If I get one, I work, otherwise not. All our fellow brothers work for seven days by rotation, if I work for seven days, another person will work next work then someone else. Sometimes the rice was not enough, it was insufficient. If I work, then I have some money, otherwise, we make daal from the pulses we get. However, with WFP, I did not face any problem for payment, we work accordingly and they make our payments on time. After seven days of work, they pay us the money. They never create any problem for us.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 8245.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 03 July 2018  WFP implements disaster risk reduction through Cash for Work, where vulnerable male and female refugees and host community members according to their interest and ability are engaged in community-based infrastructure rehabilitation and risk mitigation activities. Key activities include improving access to the mega camp via foot trails, feeder roads, improving drainage channels and outlets, site stabilisation and other site works in support of the Site Management Sector. Over 27,000 participants (10% female) have so far been engaged in DRR activities.  In the Photo: Faruq (20). “I am Faruq, I am 20 years old. I have 8 members in my family.  When we first came here, we  did not have any shelter to take refuge, no clothes, nothing. I did not have anything with me, everything was taken by the Mog (Burmese), money, gold, silver, all our properties. Our houses, everything, they burnt all our properties, and took everything. We mostly suffered for the food, we starved, we did not have any place to stay. Muslim brothers helped us to get food, and be energized, they made shelters for us to live. Since they gave us the bamboos for the shelters, we can now reside somewhere, we have a place to stay. By the mercy of Allah, we are getting the rations but the quantity is improper. Twice a month they are giving the ration but the quantity is not enough, sometimes we want to eat vegetables and fishes but we do not have money. If we do not have money, how can we buy them? Now, I got a job with WFP, a seven days’ contract. Recently I have worked for seven days, got the money, and they are all finished. I could survive with that money for three- four days. I will search for work in other places, if I can get something, it’s great, if not, then I will have to survive on the pulses.  After coming here, for two- three months we had to suffer a lot. After suffering for a few months, through donations we started to get foods. WFP is building a road near to the GFD points, from where we get the rice, they take people on a seven day’s contract. I am working there for seven days, and with those money, I usually do the grocery shopping for my family. But the money I get finishes within two- three days, so I try to find another job. If I get one, I work, otherwise not. All our fellow brothers work for seven days by rotation, if I work for seven days, another person will work next work then someone else. Sometimes the rice was not enough, it was insufficient. If I work, then I have some money, otherwise, we make daal from the pulses we get. However, with WFP, I did not face any problem for payment, we work accordingly and they make our payments on time. After seven days of work, they pay us the money. They never create any problem for us.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6602 x 4401 px 232.90 x 155.26 cm 6975.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 03 July 2018  WFP implements disaster risk reduction through Cash for Work, where vulnerable male and female refugees and host community members according to their interest and ability are engaged in community-based infrastructure rehabilitation and risk mitigation activities. Key activities include improving access to the mega camp via foot trails, feeder roads, improving drainage channels and outlets, site stabilisation and other site works in support of the Site Management Sector. Over 27,000 participants (10% female) have so far been engaged in DRR activities.  In the Photo: Faruq (20) and his family. “I am Faruq, I am 20 years old. I have 8 members in my family.  When we first came here, we  did not have any shelter to take refuge, no clothes, nothing. I did not have anything with me, everything was taken by the Mog (Burmese), money, gold, silver, all our properties. Our houses, everything, they burnt all our properties, and took everything. We mostly suffered for the food, we starved, we did not have any place to stay. Muslim brothers helped us to get food, and be energized, they made shelters for us to live. Since they gave us the bamboos for the shelters, we can now reside somewhere, we have a place to stay. By the mercy of Allah, we are getting the rations but the quantity is improper. Twice a month they are giving the ration but the quantity is not enough, sometimes we want to eat vegetables and fishes but we do not have money. If we do not have money, how can we buy them? Now, I got a job with WFP, a seven days’ contract. Recently I have worked for seven days, got the money, and they are all finished. I could survive with that money for three- four days. I will search for work in other places, if I can get something, it’s great, if not, then I will have to survive on the pulses.  After coming here, for two- three months we had to suffer a lot. After suffering for a few months, through donations we started to get foods. WFP is building a road near to the GFD points, from where we get the rice, they take people on a seven day’s contract. I am working there for seven days, and with those money, I usually do the grocery shopping for my family. But the money I get finishes within two- three days, so I try to find another job. If I get one, I work, otherwise not. All our fellow brothers work for seven days by rotation, if I work for seven days, another person will work next work then someone else. Sometimes the rice was not enough, it was insufficient. If I work, then I have some money, otherwise, we make daal from the pulses we get. However, with WFP, I did not face any problem for payment, we work accordingly and they make our payments on time. After seven days of work, they pay us the money. They never create any problem for us.”  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9551.00 kb

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