Loading
  • Archives
  • Views
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

"(IPTC101 contains(bhutan))": 70 results 

 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: WFP's first South Asia School Feeding Meeting in Bhutan.  Photo: WFP/Robin Landis
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 2304.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Robin Landis
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
2496 x 1820 px 88.05 x 64.21 cm 1009.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students eat school meals at lunch time at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Robin Landis
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 2186.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: 14-year-old Divya takes Ayesha Khatun, from WFP Bangladesh, on a tour of Dawakha Lower Secondary School as part of WFP's first South Asia School Feeding Meeting in Bhutan.  Photo: WFP/Robin Landis
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 4065.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 41.59 x 62.31 cm 18954.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: a student at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 41.59 x 62.31 cm 20345.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: A woman eats a school meal with students at lunch time at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. She is on a tour of the school as part of the first South Asia School Feeding Meeting in Bhutan.  Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 20818.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: Students eat school meals at lunch time at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7073 x 4565 px 59.88 x 38.65 cm 16518.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students eat school meals at lunch time at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
6777 x 4391 px 57.38 x 37.18 cm 12994.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: Ayesha Khatun, from WFP Bangladesh watches the distribution of school meals during a tour as part of WFP's first South Asia School Feeding Meeting in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 16191.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students line up for lunch at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 15436.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students line up for lunch at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 16574.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 15638.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 15809.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
6925 x 4450 px 58.63 x 37.68 cm 13710.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
6193 x 3797 px 52.43 x 32.15 cm 10343.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: a student at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 17055.00 kb
 
Bhutan, Paro, 17 August 2016  At Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan, WFP couples its school meals programme with agricultural education for the students. The students are very active in the agriculture programme, growing a range of crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion and spinach. They learn every aspect of the farming cycle: planting, making beds, watering, manuring and harvesting. One school student, 14-year-old Divya, said that learning about agriculture gave her an understanding of nutrition and linkage with the school meals, “you know, I am going to go to school with the hope that I will eventually become a professional, but in case I don’t end up getting a job in a government office or another setting, the fact that the school meals programme in Bhutan integrates agricultural learning will help me be a better farmer.”  In the photo: students at Dawakha Lower Secondary School in Bhutan. WFP’s school meals here help to reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.   Photo: WFP/Ngyuen Duc Hoang
BHU_20160817_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 62.31 x 41.59 cm 20376.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 10 May 2016  WFP supports the Bhutan Government in providing school meals to over 25,000 children. This helps to combat malnutrition, reduce gender and economic inequality, and increase primary and secondary school enrolment – particularly for girls. A nutritious meal improves children’s health and allows them to concentrate on learning. It also helps reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.  In the photo: a student is weighed as part of a health and development assessment at WFP-supported Gunitsawa School in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160510_W....JPG
2592 x 3888 px 91.44 x 137.16 cm 3371.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 10 May 2016  WFP supports the Bhutan Government in providing school meals to over 25,000 children. This helps to combat malnutrition, reduce gender and economic inequality, and increase primary and secondary school enrolment – particularly for girls. A nutritious meal improves children’s health and allows them to concentrate on learning. It also helps reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.  In the photo: students at WFP-supported Gunitsawa School in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160510_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 2866.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 10 May 2016  WFP supports the Bhutan Government in providing school meals to over 25,000 children. This helps to combat malnutrition, reduce gender and economic inequality, and increase primary and secondary school enrolment – particularly for girls. A nutritious meal improves children’s health and allows them to concentrate on learning. It also helps reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.  In the photo: students walking to WFP-supported Gunitsawa School in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160510_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 6468.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 10 May 2016  WFP supports the Bhutan Government in providing school meals to over 25,000 children. This helps to combat malnutrition, reduce gender and economic inequality, and increase primary and secondary school enrolment – particularly for girls. A nutritious meal improves children’s health and allows them to concentrate on learning. It also helps reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.  In the photo: students walking to WFP-supported Gunitsawa School in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160510_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4661.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 10 May 2016  WFP supports the Bhutan Government in providing school meals to over 25,000 children. This helps to combat malnutrition, reduce gender and economic inequality, and increase primary and secondary school enrolment – particularly for girls. A nutritious meal improves children’s health and allows them to concentrate on learning. It also helps reduce the financial burden on families, giving them an incentive to send their children to school.  In the photo: a WFP car makes its way up the unpaved roads to WFP-supported Gunitsawa School in Bhutan.   Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160510_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 2426.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 09 May 2016  The Genekha Campus of Wangbama Central School sits on a lush, green mountainside in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan. WFP has been working with the government of Bhutan for 40 years – originally, helping set up school meal programmes, and now gradually phasing out WFP support as the government takes over management of the programme. In early 2016, WFP stopped providing foo to the school – but the school meals programme is still going well, and the students themselves grow much of the food: 35 comprise the school’s agricultural club.   The school is divided into four houses. Each house is assigned a plot of land and students compete to see which team can grow the most crops, which are then sold to the school mess.   Although WFP no longer provides direct support to the school, the years of partnership can be seen in many lasting practices such as cooks being trained in good hygiene and sanitation, and neat log books tracking food stocks.   “We’re delighted that students continue to receive nutritious meals at Genekha School, even without WFP’s support,” says Piet Vochten, WFP Representative in Bhutan. “It’s an example of home-grown school feeding, and example of south-south cooperation – and an example of students taking ownership of their own nutrition and diet.”  In the photo: Food grown by the agricultural club at The Genekha Campus of Wangbama Central School is used for school meals.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160509_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 3970.00 kb
 
Bhutan, 09 May 2016  The Genekha Campus of Wangbama Central School sits on a lush, green mountainside in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan. WFP has been working with the government of Bhutan for 40 years – originally, helping set up school meal programmes, and now gradually phasing out WFP support as the government takes over management of the programme. In early 2016, WFP stopped providing foo to the school – but the school meals programme is still going well, and the students themselves grow much of the food: 35 comprise the school’s agricultural club.   The school is divided into four houses. Each house is assigned a plot of land and students compete to see which team can grow the most crops, which are then sold to the school mess.   Although WFP no longer provides direct support to the school, the years of partnership can be seen in many lasting practices such as cooks being trained in good hygiene and sanitation, and neat log books tracking food stocks.   “We’re delighted that students continue to receive nutritious meals at Genekha School, even without WFP’s support,” says Piet Vochten, WFP Representative in Bhutan. “It’s an example of home-grown school feeding, and example of south-south cooperation – and an example of students taking ownership of their own nutrition and diet.”  In the photo: Food grown by the agricultural club at The Genekha Campus of Wangbama Central School is used for school meals.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
BHU_20160509_W....JPG
2592 x 3888 px 91.44 x 137.16 cm 3524.00 kb

Copyright © World Food Programme 2005-2017. All rights reserved.