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"(IPTC101 contains(burundi))": 1133 results 

 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1311.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, 02 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: one of the health centers through which WFP implements the stunting prevention programme. Gitega is one of the provinces recording high rates of chronic malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 692.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1398.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1793.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 835.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1116.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1346.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 2106.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1074.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1854.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1123.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1724.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1842.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, Buraza, 02 February 2018  Over 464,000 children in 691 schools throughout Burundi are fed at school through the home-grown school meals programme. Fresh vegetables, fortified flour and enriched vegetable oil help overcome major deficiencies in primary school children, including vitamin A and iron deficiencies, which both affect learning abilities. In 2017, a WFP pilot included using local UHT milk in school meals for 40,000 children.  WFP aims to procure up to half of its food from local farmers by supporting the establishment of local farmer cooperatives. Last year WFP purchased 3,500 metric tons of local commodities — 31 percent of all food bought for school meals — injecting US$3 million into the local economy.  “We don’t worry any more because we eat well here at school. And even our parents don’t worry any more about what we eat at lunch time,” explains Yolande Nshimirimana, a 9th grader. “Kids stay at school because we eat well here.”  Thanks to the school feeding programme, dropout rates have decreased from 15 percent (2014) to 5 percent (2017). The Government of Burundi has recognized the programme as one of the key interventions to enrol and keep children from food-insecure provinces at school, especially girls. WFP is working to achieve further integration of school meals, nutrition, health and smallholders’ capacity building programmes, within its new interim strategic plan 2018–2020 for Burundi.  In the Photo: primary school in Buraza commune, one of the schools supported by WFP through its school feeding programme, and where the distribution of UHT milk is being piloted.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1065.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, 02 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: one of the health centers through which WFP implements the stunting prevention programme. Gitega is one of the provinces recording high rates of chronic malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
BDI_20180202_W....JPG
5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1341.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, 02 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: one of the health centers through which WFP implements the stunting prevention programme. Gitega is one of the provinces recording high rates of chronic malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
BDI_20180202_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 962.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, 02 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: one of the health centers through which WFP implements the stunting prevention programme. Gitega is one of the provinces recording high rates of chronic malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
BDI_20180202_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1033.00 kb
 
Burundi, Gitega, 02 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: one of the health centers through which WFP implements the stunting prevention programme. Gitega is one of the provinces recording high rates of chronic malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 546.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 567.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 2198.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
BDI_20180201_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 2078.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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5504 x 8256 px 46.60 x 69.90 cm 1257.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1714.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1686.00 kb
 
Burundi, Cankuzo, 01 February 2018  Approximately 70,000 pregnant and nursing women who are underweight receive rations for six months before delivery and three months after birth. In addition, more than 7,000 malnourished children under 5 years of age receive corn-soya blend as a supplement to their meals.  In the Photo: Muyaga Health Center is one of the health centers through which WFP implements targeted supplementary feeding programme for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). In this area, community-based management of MAM is well advanced.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 1769.00 kb

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