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"(IPTC101 contains(cambodia))": 394 results 

 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 14 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance. During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: when Thida Sim was 10-years-old, she used to line up to eat breakfast at Som Rong Primary School in Siem Reap, "I received breakfast every morning before my class started. That breakfast came with rice cooked with split peas and canned fish mixed with morning glory. It was very delicious," Thida said.  Now, Thida is 15-years-old and is studying in grade nine at Angkor Thom Secondary School. In primary school, Thida enjoyed her daily breakfasts as well as receiving a scholarship of 120 kilograms of rice per year - on the condition that her teacher confimed that she attended at least 80 percent of her classes. Children from poor and vulnerable households in grades four, five and six receive either rice or cash to enable their school attendance through a programme managed by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport, with WFP.  WFP's school meals and scholarship provided powerful enablers for Thida's family to keep her in school until she successfully finished her primary education and continued to secondary school. After WFP's scholarship for Thida ended at primary level, the Royal Government of Cambodia has continued to support her study since grade 7, "I now receive 240,000 Riel (USD 60) a year from the Government scholarship. I have used this money to buy a bike and study materials. I give the rest of the money to my grandmother," Thida said.  WFP is working with the Royal Government of Cambodia to establish a nationally-owned school feeding programme by 2021. In 2013, significant responsibilities for implementing food scholarship were handed over to the government.    Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161214_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5801.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,200 pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: when Thida Sim was 10-years-old, she used to line up to eat breakfast at Som Rong Primary School in Siem Reap, "I received breakfast every morning before my class started. That breakfast came with rice cooked with split peas and canned fish mixed with morning glory. It was very delicious," Thida said.  Now, Thida is 15-years-old and is studying in grade nine at Angkor Thom Secondary School. In primary school, Thida enjoyed her daily breakfasts as well as receiving a scholarship of 120 kilograms of rice per year - on the condition that her teacher confimed that she attended at least 80 percent of her classes. Children from poor and vulnerable households in grades four, five and six receive either rice or cash to enable their school attendance through a programme managed by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport, with WFP.  WFP's school meals and scholarship provided powerful enablers for Thida's family to keep her in school until she successfully finished her primary education and continued to secondary school. After WFP's scholarship for Thida ended at primary level, the Royal Government of Cambodia has continued to support her study since grade 7, "I now receive 240,000 Riel (USD 60) a year from the Government scholarship. I have used this money to buy a bike and study materials. I give the rest of the money to my grandmother," Thida said.  WFP is working with the Royal Government of Cambodia to establish a nationally-owned school feeding programme by 2021. In 2013, significant responsibilities for implementing food scholarship were handed over to the government.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161214_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 8779.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: “I water morning glory two times a week. When we harvest it, we usually sell to the school cook,” says nine-year-old Ratana Rom, who is in grade three at Som Rong Primary School.  The school shifted to home-grown school meals in 2015. Previously they received food commodities from WFP's central stocks. Now, the school purchases vegetables, rice, fish and vegetable oil and salt from local smallholder farmers. Sometimes, the school also harvests vegetables from the school gardens that are taken care of by the students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161214_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7738.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: “I water morning glory two times a week. When we harvest it, we usually sell to the school cook,” says nine-year-old Ratana Rom, who is in grade three at Som Rong Primary School.  The shifted to home-grown school meals in 2015. Previously they received food commodities from WFP's central stocks. Now, the school purchases vegetables, rice, fish and vegetable oil and salt from local smallholder farmers. Sometimes, the school also harvests vegetables from the school gardens that are taken care of by the students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161214_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 9232.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: students at Thlat Primary School in Siem Reap, where WFP has been providing nutritious breakfasts since 2014 for some 350 students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161214_W....jpg
8504 x 5669 px 300.00 x 199.99 cm 18610.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: 74-year-old Thun Pot is leader of the monks at Soryia Raung Kou pagoda, which is located about one kilometre from Thlat Primary School in Siem Reap, where WFP has been providing nutritious breakfasts since 2014 for some 350 students.  17 years ago, Thun used to be principle of the school - before becoming a monk. With a strong commitment to promoting educatio in his community, Thun has mobilised resources from local Buddhist followers in his community to be able to offer the school cooks 15 kilograms of rice per month as a compensation for their work in the School Meals programme. In total, 300 kilograms of rice has been provided to support two cooks yearly at Thlat Primary School since 2014.  "To me, the relationship between the monastery and the school is very important for its development. Monks must play a central role to advocate and promote the value of education to Buddhist followers in the community," says Thun.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5835.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap show their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6098.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap show their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 8793.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap show their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7549.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap show their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 8103.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap show their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 8476.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap draw their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5745.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap draw their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 12353.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap draw their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6767.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Each year, WFP invites children from around the world who benefit from the school meals programme to participate in the annual Children’s Design Competition. The theme for 2017 is Zero Hunger. 

WFP staff in participating country offices and in headquarters in Rome make a final 20 selection. These winners receive cash prizes from WFP and each of their schools also receives a cash prize to spend on supplies. The winning designs are reproduced on WFP merchandise including calendars, greeting cards, desk diaries and coffee mugs.  In the photo: students at Reaksmey Samaki Primary School in Siem Reap draw their entries for WFP's 2017 Children's Design Competition.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6049.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: a student in class at Thlat Primary School in Siem Reap, where WFP has been providing nutritious breakfasts since 2014 for some 350 students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 11152.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: students at Thlat Primary School in Siem Reap, where WFP has been providing nutritious breakfasts since 2014 for some 350 students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6648.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 13 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: students at Thlat Primary School in Siem Reap, where WFP has been providing nutritious breakfasts since 2014 for some 350 students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161213_W....jpg
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6434.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 13512.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5922.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 12082.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5699.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,200 pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children eat their daily WFP school meals at Som Rong Primary School. The school shifted to home-grown school meals in 2015 and now purchase vegetables, oil and salt from the surrounding community to cook for their 200 students. Sometimes the school harvests vegetables like morning glory and long bean peas from the school garden taken care of by the students.  Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 8683.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 12746.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Siemp Reap Province, 12 December 2016  Primary school completion and secondary school enrolment rates in Cambodia are low. To support universal access to education, WFP - through USDA and McGovern-Dole support - has been providing nutritious school meals to Cambodian pre- and primary school children in rural and food-inseucre communities since 2008. WFP also runs programmes offering take-home cash or rice in exchange for at least 80 percent school attendance.   During the 2016-17 school year, the home grown school meals programme is being implemented in 84 schools located in Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces and provides a daily hot breakfast to some 17,2oo pre-primary and primary school children. Local farmers, producers, suppliers and their families benefit from the programme as it provides opportunity for additional income, economic growth and job creation.  In the photo: children at a school in Siem Reap eat their daily WFP school meals.   Photo: WFP/Ratanak Leng
KAM_20161212_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5923.00 kb

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