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"(IPTC101 contains(colombia))": 721 results 

 
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11635.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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2448 x 3264 px 86.36 x 115.15 cm 3639.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
COL_20180920_W....JPG
2448 x 3264 px 86.36 x 115.15 cm 3739.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Dianna Dauber
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3024 x 4032 px 106.68 x 142.24 cm 4106.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3264 x 2448 px 115.15 x 86.36 cm 3418.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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2448 x 3264 px 86.36 x 115.15 cm 4047.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”. Michelle brings her sick baby, Ashley, across the river into Colombia to get medicine from the Red Cross that she can’t get in Venezuela.  Photos: WFP/Dianna Dauber
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3414 x 2560 px 120.44 x 90.31 cm 3995.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Dianna Dauber
COL_20180920_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 3684.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border near Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Trocha” illegal river crossing. Venezuelan migrants carrying family members and belongings across this river that separates Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela has stopped producing id cards and passports so many people leaving Venezuela must now cross the border at illegal rivers, jungles and desert crossings called “Trochas”.  Photos: WFP/Dianna Dauber
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4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 3849.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11931.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 20 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 13355.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3240 x 5760 px 27.43 x 48.77 cm 8812.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 12002.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 18 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Caminantes” Arliani (20 yrs) and Perez (2yrs) - not visible in the Photo - walking from St. Cristobol, Venezuela to Bogata Colombia. Her group left her that morning because they could not keep up. (She is wearing slippers). She thinks her mother is in Bogota but has not heard from her in 7months.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 14609.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 18 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Caminantes” Arliani (20 yrs) and Perez (2yrs) walking from St. Cristobol, Venezuela to Bogata Colombia. Her group left her that morning because they could not keep up. (She is wearing slippers). She thinks her mother is in Bogota but has not heard from her in 7months.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3240 x 5760 px 27.43 x 48.77 cm 10434.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 18 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Caminantes” Arliani (20 yrs) and Perez (2yrs) walking from St. Cristobol, Venezuela to Bogata Colombia. Her group left her that morning because they could not keep up. (She is wearing slippers). She thinks her mother is in Bogota but has not heard from her in 7months.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
COL_20180919_W....JPG
5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11440.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 18 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela.  “Caminantes” Arliani (20 yrs) and Perez (2yrs) walking from St. Cristobol, Venezuela to Bogata Colombia. Her group left her that morning because they could not keep up. (She is wearing slippers). She thinks her mother is in Bogota but has not heard from her in 7months.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
COL_20180919_W....JPG
5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 9838.00 kb
 
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
COL_20180919_W....JPG
5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 9517.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3264 x 2448 px 115.15 x 86.36 cm 3608.00 kb
 
Colombia, Los Patios, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border at Los Patios Bridge, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Diego Alvarez
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960 x 1280 px 8.13 x 10.84 cm 122.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Santo Domingo De Silos, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. 
Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3264 x 2448 px 115.15 x 86.36 cm 1963.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Los Patios, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border at Los Patios Bridge, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder. Daria Silva (not visible ion the Photo) and her extended family are walking to Cali from Cucuta. They left their home and family members (including children) in Venezuela 3 months ago.  Photos: WFP/Dianna Dauber
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3024 x 4032 px 106.68 x 142.24 cm 3822.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Los Patios, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border at Los Patios Bridge, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder. Daria Silva and her extended family are walking to Cali from Cucuta. They left their home and family members (including children) in Venezuela 3 months ago.  Photos: WFP/Norha Restrepo
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3024 x 4032 px 25.60 x 34.14 cm 1057.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Los Patios, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border at Los Patios Bridge, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder. Daria Silva (in brown with red backpack, first from Right) and her extended family are walking to Cali from Cucuta. They left their home and family members (including children) in Venezuela 3 months ago.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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3264 x 2448 px 115.15 x 86.36 cm 3334.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Colombia, Los Patios, Cúcuta (Norte de Santander), 19 September 2018  Colombia is facing an unprecedented crisis as thousands of people from Venezuela continue to cross the border everyday due to lack of food, medicine, other basic needs and loss of livelihoods. The mass exodus, one of the largest in Latin American history, has become a regional crisis and is expected to continue. Migrants are increasingly using Colombia as a corridor to enter Ecuador, Perú and other countries in South America, overwhelming host governments.   Colombians and their government are doing all they can to step up to this challenge. The country has made progress in the peace process and ending hunger, however as this crisis grows in proportion, it jeopardizes recent gains. The crisis is affecting host families and communities receiving large number of migrants, particularly indigenous communities which welcome new arrivals but face very difficult living conditions.  WFP is providing food assistance to the most vulnerable in Colombia and Ecuador, especially women and children, who access to basic services, face protection risks and do not know where their next meal is coming from.  In the Photo: Colombia-Venezuela border at Los Patios Bridge, Cúcuta, Colombia, one of the main entry points for people crossing from Venezuela into Colombia. Around 900 people a day cross into Cucuta, Colombia from Venezuela. “Caminantes” are walking from Cucuta to other cities in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Ecuador is 1600km from Cucuta and takes about a month to reach. They are walking 11 hours a day and must cross a 3400 meter mountain pass enduring freezing temperatures and falling victim to rape, sickness and even murder. Daria Silva (not visible in this Photo) and her extended family are walking to Cali from Cucuta. They left their home and family members (including children) in Venezuela 3 months ago.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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2448 x 3264 px 86.36 x 115.15 cm 3099.00 kb

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