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"(IPTC101 contains(congo)) and (IPTC101 contains(democratic republic))": 2247 results 

 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 03 August 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: the 28 cubic meter refrigerated container  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2619.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 03 August 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Four of the eight fridges storing Oxytocin, a life-saving medicine  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2469.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato (right)showing some of the cooler boxes, essential to contribute to save lives in the field  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2989.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the cooler boxes, essential to contribute to save lives in the field  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2308.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3138.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2614.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2874.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6601.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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800 x 533 px 6.77 x 4.51 cm 232.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6874.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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820 x 546 px 6.94 x 4.62 cm 210.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 381.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 282.00 kb
 
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 06 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Gustave Mwamba
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   The Tanganyika province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   Second round of cash distributions funded by ECHO in the IDP sites of Katinika (43.000 beneficiaries) and Lubwe (7,500 beneficiaries), close to the town of Kamelie (main town of the province).   This province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   Second round of cash distributions funded by ECHO in the IDP sites of Katinika (43.000 beneficiaries) and Lubwe (7,500 beneficiaries), close to the town of Kamelie (main town of the province).   This province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   The Tanganyika province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   Second round of cash distributions funded by ECHO in the IDP sites of Katinika (43.000 beneficiaries) and Lubwe (7,500 beneficiaries), close to the town of Kamelie (main town of the province).   This province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   Second round of cash distributions funded by ECHO in the IDP sites of Katinika (43.000 beneficiaries) and Lubwe (7,500 beneficiaries), close to the town of Kamelie (main town of the province).   This province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanganyika province, 16 May 2018   Second round of cash distributions funded by ECHO in the IDP sites of Katinika (43.000 beneficiaries) and Lubwe (7,500 beneficiaries), close to the town of Kamelie (main town of the province).   This province counts more than 600,000 IDPs and those living there arrived between end 2016 and mid 2017. The displacements are caused by the resurgence of the ethnic conflict between 2 communities (Luba/Twa, also known as autochthone populations or pygmies). The persistence of insecurity in areas of origin and the volatility of the environment due to fighting between Luba and Twa communities reduce return opportunities.  WFP scaled up operations to response to this crisis with food, cash and nutrition programmes despite scarceness of resources. ECHO provided with a contribution of 4.3 million USD for cash distributions. massive operations to distribute this cash with 972,000 $ distributed to 65,000 IDP in March, 1.9 million $ distributed to 96,000 IDPs in May and 1.4 million planned to be distributed to 61,000 IDPs in June.  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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