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"(IPTC101 contains(guatemala))": 719 results 

 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: A local beneficiary of P4P project explains to Ertharin Cousin, WFP Executive Director, how the village of Sinaneca whitstands the prolonged spell. Villagers know about weather change, El Niño effects and are learning how to be more resilient with WFP’s technical assistance such as soil conservancy techniques, and drip irrigation.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4870 x 3129 px 41.23 x 26.49 cm 10233.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Milfred Molina (on the left), President of the Development Communitary Committee in Sinaneca, shows the pilot project with drip irrigation systems to be introduced in the village once the dam has enough water in the rainy season (May to October). His aim is to teach how to plant home orchards and thus to improve the diet of the families with vegetables and fruits.  Milfred Molina (left) greets Ertharin Cousin (center), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée (right), President of WFP’s Executive Board in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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2823 x 2556 px 23.90 x 21.64 cm 4934.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Milfred Molina (on the left), President of the Development Communitary Committee in Sinaneca, shows the pilot project with drip irrigation systems to be introduced in the village once the dam has enough water in the rainy season (May to October). His aim is to teach how to plant home orchards and thus to improve the diet of the families with vegetables and fruits.  Milfred Molina (left) greets Ertharin Cousin (center), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée (right), President of WFP’s Executive Board in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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2000 x 1333 px 16.93 x 11.29 cm 2494.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Milfred Molina (on the right), President of the Development Communitary Committee in Sinaneca, shows the pilot project with drip irrigation systems to be introduced in the village once the dam has enough water in the rainy season (May to October). His aim is to teach how to plant home orchards and thus to improve the diet of the families with vegetables and fruits.  Milfred Molina (right) greets Ertharin Cousin (left), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée (center), President of WFP’s Executive Board in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4781 x 3071 px 40.48 x 26.00 cm 11524.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Milfred Molina (on the right), President of the Development Communitary Committee in Sinaneca, shows the pilot project with drip irrigation systems to be introduced in the village once the dam has enough water in the rainy season (May to October). His aim is to teach how to plant home orchards and thus to improve the diet of the families with vegetables and fruits.  Milfred Molina (right) greets Ertharin Cousin (left), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée (center), President of WFP’s Executive Board in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 9455.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Milfred Molina (on the right), President of the Development Communitary Committee in Sinaneca, shows the pilot project with drip irrigation systems to be introduced in the village once the dam has enough water in the rainy season (May to October). His aim is to teach how to plant home orchards and thus to improve the diet of the families with vegetables and fruits.  Milfred Molina (right) greets Ertharin Cousin (left), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée (center), President of WFP’s Executive Board in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 8966.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: a girl standing beside the public tap in Sinaneca, San Jorge (province of Zacapa). Sinaneca is one of the driest communities in the Dry Corridor and its inhabitants suffer the dry spell with the little amount of water they can get.   Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 12448.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: a mother filling as much gallons of water a the public tap in Sinaneca, San Jorge (province of Zacapa). Sinaneca is one of the driest communities in the Dry Corridor and its inhabitants suffer the dry spell with the little amount of water they can get.   Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 2949 px 41.72 x 24.97 cm 10900.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: a woman of Sinaneca gets actively involved in the building of the dam that will provide water for the community. She guides the donkeys that carry construction materials such as sand and stones uphill to the construction site.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 12050.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: a woman of Sinaneca gets actively involved in the building of the dam that will provide water for the community. She guides the donkeys that carry construction materials such as sand and stones uphill to the construction site.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 11212.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Mario Galindo, Coordinator for Emergency Response and Preparednes in WFP Guatemala, marks the dam’s construction site in Sinaneca using a GPS locator, so the ED’s helicopter can spot the place from the air.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 12573.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: girls standing beside the public tap in Sinaneca, San Jorge (province of Zacapa). Sinaneca is one of the driest communities in the Dry Corridor and its inhabitants suffer the dry spell with the little amount of water they can get.   Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Mario Galindo, Coordinator for Emergency Response and Preparednes in WFP Guatemala, coordinates the landing of the ED’s helicopter in Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Mario Galindo, Coordinator for Emergency Response and Preparednes in WFP Guatemala, coordinates the landing of the ED’s helicopter in Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 8967.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Mario Galindo, Coordinator for Emergency Response and Preparednes in WFP Guatemala, coordinates the landing of the ED’s helicopter in Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 10424.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin, WFP Executive Director walks the dirth paths of the village of Sinaneca in a field trip on April 6th 2016. At her right, Mario Touchette, WFP Guatemala’s Country Director.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 11673.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin (right), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée meet with the Vice Minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Felipe Orellana in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin (right), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée meet with the Vice Minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Felipe Orellana (left of the picture) in the field trip to Sinaneca. At ED’s left: Mario Touchette, WFP Guatemala Country Director. Deborah Chatsis, Ambassador of Canada in Guatemala. And Miguel Barreto, Regional Director, WFP Latin America and the Caribbean.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin (right), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée meet with the Vice Minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Felipe Orellana (left of the picture) in the field trip to Sinaneca. At ED’s left: Mario Touchette, WFP Guatemala Country Director. Deborah Chatsis, Ambassador of Canada in Guatemala. And Miguel Barreto, Regional Director, WFP Latin America and the Caribbean.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 14258.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin (right), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée meet with the Vice Minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Felipe Orellana (left of the picture) in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 11979.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin (right), WFP Executive Director and Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée meet with the Vice Minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Felipe Orellana (left of the picture) in the field trip to Sinaneca.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 16961.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: group photo of WFP ED’s field trip to Sinaneca, San Jorge (province of Zacapa); from left to right: - Mario Galindo, Coordinator for Emergency Response and Preparednes in WFP Guatemala, - Miguel Barreto, Regional Director, WFP Latin America and the Caribbean, - Irma Palma, WFP Guatemala Programme Officer, - Ambassador H.E. Stephanie Hochstetter Skinner-Klée, President of WFP’s Executive Board, - Mario Touchette, WFP Guatemala Country Director, - Mahomed Vasquez, WFP Guatemala’s P4P Field Technician, - Ertharin Cousin, WFP Executive Director, - Juan Valdez, WFP Guatemala’s P4P Field Technician, - Hae-Won Park, WFP Guatemala Programme Officer, - Tomas Pallas, Chief of International Cooperation of the European Union in Guatemala, - H. E. Deborah Chatsis, Ambassador of Canada in Guatemala, - Christina Laur, Chief of International Cooperation in the Embassy of Canada, - Felipe Orellana, Vice Minister of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: Ertharin Cousin, WFP Executive Director walks the dirth paths of the village of Sinaneca in a field trip on April 6th 2016. At her right, Mario Touchette, WFP Guatemala’s Country Director.  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: the construction of the dam in Sinaneca is located at the upper side of a ravine where a creek runs. The high of the armored cement wall will be 8 meters, and 30 m wide. It will have 1,400  to 1,700 cubic metres of capacity. The dam will be ready before the rainy season begins (month of May).  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 16270.00 kb
 
Guatemala, Dry Sinaneca, San Jorge (Dry Corridor - province of Zacapa), 6 April 2016  The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) committed today to both assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. Speaking at the end of visits to El Salvador and Guatemala to see the compounded impact of El Niño, one of the strongest in the last half century, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said WFP planned to scale up to help the most vulnerable in the four countries through August. “At the same time, working closely with governments, we are placing resilience at the heart of our longer response. We must work to ensure vulnerable people are not repeatedly pushed deeper into hunger and can build longer-lasting assets that will survive potential disasters,” Cousin said in Guatemala.
 
“Overall WFP is committed to helping people build a world with Zero Hunger,” she added. “A key to this global goal being achieved in Central America and elsewhere is that communities are able to better adapt, ensuring they are more prepared for climatic shocks and can recover faster.” People hit by drought benefit from programmes which deliver cash, cash-based vouchers and mobile transfers in El Salvador and Guatemala to obtain food, including more diversified and fresh produce, while simultaneously building local economies. In addition, WFP and its partners provide nutrition training as well as support for reforestation, irrigation and community gardens. The Executive Director visited communities in the drought-prone Dry Corridor where she talked with local people about how to overcome the impact of the extended dry period.
 
Next week, Cousin visits Haiti to meet vulnerable communities also struggling with the impact of El Niño. According to assessments by WFP and governments, more than 2 million people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are food insecure. Most are subsistence farmers who harvest once a year and live in the Dry Corridor. At governments’ request, WFP provided food assistance in 2014 and 2015 to more than 1.2 million people in the three countries. WFP is concerned that from March to April, small farmers in Central America may have to drain their cash and food reserves to obtain seeds and other inputs for the first crop cycle of 2016. Meanwhile, 3.6 million people in Haiti are food insecure after three years of severe drought. WFP initially responded with food distributions for a two-month period to 120,000 people. It now plans to launch an emergency operation to assist 1 million people, primarily by cash transfers. More nutrition interventions are planned to prevent a rise in acute malnutrition. WFP needs US$100 million to assist 1.6 million victims of drought through August in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.  In the Photo: the construction of the dam in Sinaneca is located at the upper side of a ravine where a creek runs. The high of the armored cement wall will be 8 meters, and 30 m wide. It will have 1,400  to 1,700 cubic metres of capacity. The dam will be ready before the rainy season begins (month of May).  Photo: WFP/Miguel Vargas
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 15865.00 kb

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