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"(IPTC101 contains(guinea)) and not (IPTC101 contains(bissau))": 699 results 

 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2470.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1699.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1816.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2775.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 3582.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1949.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161109_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2132.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161109_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1839.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Gouéké, 09 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Women rice farmers in Gouéké cultivate the rice that is cooked in the schools of the region. WFP buys their rice and then dispatches it to the schools involved in the School Meals Programme.   Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2584.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Local women serving lunch for the school-children as part of the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1760.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Local women serving lunch for the school-children as part of the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1680.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161108_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1640.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161108_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1539.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Local women preparing lunch for the school-children as part of the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161108_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2128.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 08 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161108_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1180.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1479.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161107_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2170.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Apart from the regular school meals offered 4 times per week, WFP has targeted schools in Seny’s region to support girls and their families, in an effort to help girls enroll and stay in school. Each girl, receives 5 liters of oil three times a year - during Easter and Christmas breaks and at the end of the school year.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 2100.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161107_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1596.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
GUI_20161107_W....JPG
4898 x 3265 px 172.79 x 115.18 cm 1691.00 kb
 
Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Seny Lamah is 11 years old and she is in 2nd grade at Samoué’s elementary school, in Nzerekoré region. She lives with her mother, Gobou Doré and her three sisters in a house situated a few blocks away from her school. Seny lost her father to Ebola.  This is the first time since the outbreak of the epidemic that Seny and her family can settle in a place they can call home again. When Seny's father died, the family was forced to move from place to place. The stigma that followed the people affected by Ebola was a heavy burden for the whole family.  "Last year my daughter was in a school that wasn’t supported by WFP and it was very hard for all of us. Now, Seny can eat at school and she can focus better in class,” says Gobou.  Asked if she likes school and about her dreams, Seny says: “I want to become a doctor in the future. I want to save lives.”  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: WFP (PAM - Programme Alimentaire Mondial) cups provided as part of the School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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Guinea, Nzerekoré Region, Kabieta, 07 November 2016  For two years, Guinea was hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, which killed some 2,500 and infected more than 3,800 people. The outbreak had a devastating impact on thousands of families and led the country to a state of panic.  In the Nzerekoré region, believed by researchers to be the starting-point of the epidemic, WFP’s school meals were halted as schools were closed. Farmers were affected because they couldn’t cultivate their fields or harvest/sell their crops. Many villages across the region were abandoned as populations fled to save their lives.  When school meals resumed in October 2015, WFP expanded its school meals activities, including in Nzerekoré region to support children and their families, especially those who were heavily affected. Some children lost one or both parents.   Currently, WFP provides hot school meals to 248,930 children in 1,605 schools in Guinea throughout the school year. This aims to improve the attendance rates of elementary school students. As an incentive to encourage girls to stay enrolled in school, WFP provides take-home food supplies to girls enrolled in the final grade.  In the photo: Children enjoying their lunch provided by the WFP School Meals Programme.  Photo: WFP/Simon Pierre Diouf
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