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"(IPTC101 contains(haiti))": 3591 results 

 
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Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim sitting in the pilot seat in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
3024 x 4032 px 25.60 x 34.14 cm 4983.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim sitting in the pilot seat in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
3024 x 4032 px 25.60 x 34.14 cm 5369.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim sitting in the pilot seat in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 34.14 x 25.60 cm 5153.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim sitting in the pilot seat in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4032 x 3024 px 34.14 x 25.60 cm 4880.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Danourah, 26, is our Haitian logistics assistant for UNHAS.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 5037.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Danourah, 26, is our Haitian logistics assistant for UNHAS.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 5241.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Danourah, 26, is our Haitian logistics assistant for UNHAS.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 5004.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Danourah, 26, is our Haitian logistics assistant for UNHAS.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 5617.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Timofei, from Russia, is a copilot for UNHAS in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 5549.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Timofei, from Russia, is a copilot for UNHAS in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 2940.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Timofei, from Russia, is a copilot for UNHAS in Haiti. Behind him is the flight engineer   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 3337.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim in front of a UNHAS Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 2138.00 kb
 
Haiti, Port-au-Prince, (Ouest department), 08 April 2020   In Haiti UNHAS continues to provide lifesaving transportation services to humanitarian aid workers, has revised its procedures and is implementing measures to prevent the risk of infection and transmission of the Corona virus.  Our Mi-8 UNHAS helicopter can usually transport up to 22 humanitarian staff (only 11 now during COVID19) - as well as light cargo, which these days consists mostly of medical supplies and equipment.  In the photo: Maxim sitting in the pilot seat in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter in Haiti.   Photo: WFP/Antoine Vallas
HAI_20200408_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 4050.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Ka Soleil Health Center, 26 November 2016  WFP is scaling up its emergency operation in Haiti to provide food assistance, starting with 700,000 people severely affected by rising prices and a drop in agricultural production. More than one in three Haitians, or 3.7 million people, need urgent food assistance in both rural and urban areas. Among these, 1 million are suffering from severe hunger according to a nationwide study conducted in August 2019 by the Government with WFP-FAO support.  In the Photo: 25-year-old mother of four, Alectine Michael brought her youngest child, 8 month-old Jacqueline to the health care to be checked for malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8209.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Ka Soleil Health Center, 26 November 2016  WFP is scaling up its emergency operation in Haiti to provide food assistance, starting with 700,000 people severely affected by rising prices and a drop in agricultural production. More than one in three Haitians, or 3.7 million people, need urgent food assistance in both rural and urban areas. Among these, 1 million are suffering from severe hunger according to a nationwide study conducted in August 2019 by the Government with WFP-FAO support.  In the Photo: Inside the Ka Soleil Health Center, Gonaives, Haiti.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7121.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8813.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9112.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7134.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9496.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8032.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau Market, 26 November 2019  In the Photo: The open-air market of Plateau, outside Gonaives, is one of the biggest in the country, normally bringing farmers, traders and regular customers from the whole north and the capital Port-au-Prince. Due to the recent insecurity, like so many others around the country, this market has been affected. Farmers say that traders often offer only half of the value of what they paid before September for fresh and locally produced fruits and vegetables. Although, it is becoming busier than in recent weeks, many traders still can’t go pass roadblocks along the roads. Even some neighbourhoods inside Gonaives are cut-off from this market. There is too much offer from the local farmers and not enough purchase power from the traders or households that are becoming more vulnerable.  The recent unrest has only reinforced the economic crisis already faced by the country, with a 20 percent devaluation of the local currency against the US dollar over the last year.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191126_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6605.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau, 25 November 2019  Osena Previlon is a 42-year-old woman, mother of two, who grows vegetables in the Plateau area, close to the town of Gonaives. She shares the responsibility of the fields with other farmers and they share the harvests. Osena is member of a group of 250 men and women small holder farmers working with a local WFP partner to provide fresh food for the school feeding programme. But schools have been closed since the supposed start of the academic year in September, due to socio-economic unrest known locally as “pays-lock” or “locked country”. Pays-lock has had damaging consequences on the economy, with businesses closing, people losing income and facing serious difficulties with transport due to barricades. Osena continues to work on her farm, growing a variety of products: spinach, okra, eggplants, papayas, citrus, basil and peppers. Given that the schools are closed, she goes to a large market outside Gonaives to try and sell her products. With “pays-lock”, she says that buyers are offering her half of what she used to receive before the crisis started in September. To improve her income, she also prepares meals for other local farmers. She also owns a few goats and chicken that she sells on the market when she needs more money. Her two daughters Bevalie and Rose Carline stay at home and help her with the running of their home with her elderly mother and the occasional visiting neighbour. Osena says she separated from her husband after episodes of domestic violence.    In the Photo: Osena’s niece Leny Previlon, eats lunch – a plate of rice, chicken and vegetable stew – on the floor of Osena’s house terrace in Gonaives, Haiti.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191125_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 5501.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau, 25 November 2019  Osena Previlon is a 42-year-old woman, mother of two, who grows vegetables in the Plateau area, close to the town of Gonaives. She shares the responsibility of the fields with other farmers and they share the harvests. Osena is member of a group of 250 men and women small holder farmers working with a local WFP partner to provide fresh food for the school feeding programme. But schools have been closed since the supposed start of the academic year in September, due to socio-economic unrest known locally as “pays-lock” or “locked country”. Pays-lock has had damaging consequences on the economy, with businesses closing, people losing income and facing serious difficulties with transport due to barricades. Osena continues to work on her farm, growing a variety of products: spinach, okra, eggplants, papayas, citrus, basil and peppers. Given that the schools are closed, she goes to a large market outside Gonaives to try and sell her products. With “pays-lock”, she says that buyers are offering her half of what she used to receive before the crisis started in September. To improve her income, she also prepares meals for other local farmers. She also owns a few goats and chicken that she sells on the market when she needs more money. Her two daughters Bevalie and Rose Carline stay at home and help her with the running of their home with her elderly mother and the occasional visiting neighbour. Osena says she separated from her husband after episodes of domestic violence.    In the Photo: Osena (pink headscarf) eats lunch with her two daughters and a cousin under her porch.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191125_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8818.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau, 25 November 2019  Osena Previlon is a 42-year-old woman, mother of two, who grows vegetables in the Plateau area, close to the town of Gonaives. She shares the responsibility of the fields with other farmers and they share the harvests. Osena is member of a group of 250 men and women small holder farmers working with a local WFP partner to provide fresh food for the school feeding programme. But schools have been closed since the supposed start of the academic year in September, due to socio-economic unrest known locally as “pays-lock” or “locked country”. Pays-lock has had damaging consequences on the economy, with businesses closing, people losing income and facing serious difficulties with transport due to barricades. Osena continues to work on her farm, growing a variety of products: spinach, okra, eggplants, papayas, citrus, basil and peppers. Given that the schools are closed, she goes to a large market outside Gonaives to try and sell her products. With “pays-lock”, she says that buyers are offering her half of what she used to receive before the crisis started in September. To improve her income, she also prepares meals for other local farmers. She also owns a few goats and chicken that she sells on the market when she needs more money. Her two daughters Bevalie and Rose Carline stay at home and help her with the running of their home with her elderly mother and the occasional visiting neighbour. Osena says she separated from her husband after episodes of domestic violence.    In the Photo: Osena’s niece Leny Previlon, eats lunch – a plate of rice, chicken and vegetable stew – on the floor of Osena’s house terrace in Gonaives, Haiti.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191125_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 5824.00 kb
 
Haiti, Gonaives, Plateau, 25 November 2019  Osena Previlon is a 42-year-old woman, mother of two, who grows vegetables in the Plateau area, close to the town of Gonaives. She shares the responsibility of the fields with other farmers and they share the harvests. Osena is member of a group of 250 men and women small holder farmers working with a local WFP partner to provide fresh food for the school feeding programme. But schools have been closed since the supposed start of the academic year in September, due to socio-economic unrest known locally as “pays-lock” or “locked country”. Pays-lock has had damaging consequences on the economy, with businesses closing, people losing income and facing serious difficulties with transport due to barricades. Osena continues to work on her farm, growing a variety of products: spinach, okra, eggplants, papayas, citrus, basil and peppers. Given that the schools are closed, she goes to a large market outside Gonaives to try and sell her products. With “pays-lock”, she says that buyers are offering her half of what she used to receive before the crisis started in September. To improve her income, she also prepares meals for other local farmers. She also owns a few goats and chicken that she sells on the market when she needs more money. Her two daughters Bevalie and Rose Carline stay at home and help her with the running of their home with her elderly mother and the occasional visiting neighbour. Osena says she separated from her husband after episodes of domestic violence.    In the Photo: Osena’s niece Leny Previlon, eats lunch – a plate of rice, chicken and vegetable stew – on the floor of Osena’s house terrace in Gonaives, Haiti.  Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli
HAI_20191125_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 5279.00 kb

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