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"(IPTC101 contains(india))": 921 results 

 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6553.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6789.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6292.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7819.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5359.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students eat curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170405_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6310.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Cuttack, 05 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: women prepare fortified rice which will be distributed under the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7993.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170404_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5755.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170404_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6442.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170404_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5449.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170404_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5737.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 4927.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: students receive curry for lunch as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6134.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 04 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: a woman prepares curry for students for the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Dhenkanal.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6894.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Dhenkanal, 03 April 2017  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia. We also help tackle malnutrition by fortifying food given to babies and young children in the Kerala State.  In the photo: a blending unit mixes fortified rice kernels with regular rice to produce fortified rice.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
IND_20170403_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 8237.00 kb
 
India, Kerala, Wayanad, 23 February 2017  One of the main programmes to address malnutrition in India is the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) programme, under the aegis of the Ministry of Women and Child Development.  In the ICDS programme, state governments provide a comprehensive package of services to pregnant women and new mothers, as well as to children under the age of six. Take-home rations to supplement children’s diets are an important part of this programme.  In Kerala, under the ICDS programme, children between the ages of six months and three years are given a blended food locally known as nutri-mix or 'amrutham' at their local 'anganwadi' centres.  Produced by women’s self-help groups known as neighborhood groups, nutri-mix is a non-fortified product that meets the caloric and protein content norms laid down by the Government of India. The programme reaches nearly three quarters (73 percent) of children of this age group.  Now WFP is using its global food fortification expertise to work with the Government of Kerala to pilot the fortification of nutri-mix with additional vitamins and minerals.  In the photo: women and children collect packages of specially fortified take-home rations at a distribution centre in Wayanad.  Photo: WFP/Siddarth Waghulkar
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 7775.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Cuttack, 14 December 2016  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: women serve WFP-fortified rice as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Cuttack.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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2592 x 1728 px 91.44 x 60.96 cm 1388.00 kb
 
India, Odisha, Cuttack, 13 December 2016  To boost the nutritional value of the Government’s Midday Meal school feeding programme, WFP is pioneering the multi-micronutrient fortification of school meals. The pilot project saw rice fortified with iron, which was distributed in a single district, resulting in a 20 percent drop in anaemia.  In the photo: a woman serves WFP-fortified rice as part of the Government's Midday Meal Programme at a school in Cuttack.  Photo: WFP/Isheeta Sumra
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2592 x 1728 px 91.44 x 60.96 cm 1028.00 kb
 
India, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, 12 January 2016  United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Ertharin Cousin on 14 January concluded a three-day visit to India where she met senior government officials and private-sector leaders in New Delhi. Cousin also visited Odisha where WFP is collaborating with the state government to address food and nutrition security issues. WFP in India supports the central and state governments in the effective and efficient implementation of the National Food Security Act and in enhancing nutrition security. WFP also provides technical support and capacity building to the government’s food-based social safety nets, including the Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS), Mid-Day Meal programme and Integrated Child Development Services.   “The work done in India is critical to achieving Zero Hunger globally by 2030. WFP supports the government with its global expertise and innovative solutions to boost food and nutrition security,” Cousin said after meeting the Vice Chairman of the National Institution for Transforming India Aayog, Minister of State for Agriculture, Cabinet Secretary and the Secretary Ministry of External Affairs. Cousin signed a letter of intent with the Minister of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution which will bring together several ministries with the WFP to finalize a proposal for establishing a Centre of Excellence on Food and Nutrition Security in India. During her visit, Cousin also met with business leaders to further partnerships between the business community and WFP to address the issues of malnutrition and food insecurity in India. She advocated for the role of the private sector in achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals through their expertise and funding. In Odisha, Cousin met the Chief Minister, Minister of Food Supplies and Consumer Welfare, Skills Development and Technical Education, Minister of School and Mass Education and Industries, Chief Secretary, as well as senior officials from the Government of Odisha. Cousin inaugurated WFP’s rice-fortification initiative at a central kitchen operated by the Akshaya Patra Foundation in Odisha. Rice enriched with iron is served to school children under the government’s Mid-Day Meal programme. The iron fortification decreases the prevalence of anaemia among children.   Cousin also visited a Fair-Price Shop, equipped with a biometric-enabled point-of-sales device designed to authenticate beneficiaries under India’s TPDS. In Fair-Price Shops, subsidized grain is sold as part of India's TPDS, which aims to provide around 800 million people with subsidized monthly household rations each year. WFP will continue to support the government in transforming the TPDS and enriching the nutritional content of the Mid-Day Meal programme through evidence-based pilot projects, the scale-up of innovative best practices in nutrition, and empowering beneficiaries of the government's food-based social security schemes.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin launching a project to fortify rice used in a Mid-Day Meal programme at Capital High School, Bhubaneswar/Odisha.  Photo: WFP/Deepak Sabhachandani
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7259.00 kb
 
India, Cuttack, Odisha, 12 January 2016  United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Ertharin Cousin on 14 January concluded a three-day visit to India where she met senior government officials and private-sector leaders in New Delhi. Cousin also visited Odisha where WFP is collaborating with the state government to address food and nutrition security issues. WFP in India supports the central and state governments in the effective and efficient implementation of the National Food Security Act and in enhancing nutrition security. WFP also provides technical support and capacity building to the government’s food-based social safety nets, including the Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS), Mid-Day Meal programme and Integrated Child Development Services.   “The work done in India is critical to achieving Zero Hunger globally by 2030. WFP supports the government with its global expertise and innovative solutions to boost food and nutrition security,” Cousin said after meeting the Vice Chairman of the National Institution for Transforming India Aayog, Minister of State for Agriculture, Cabinet Secretary and the Secretary Ministry of External Affairs. Cousin signed a letter of intent with the Minister of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution which will bring together several ministries with the WFP to finalize a proposal for establishing a Centre of Excellence on Food and Nutrition Security in India. During her visit, Cousin also met with business leaders to further partnerships between the business community and WFP to address the issues of malnutrition and food insecurity in India. She advocated for the role of the private sector in achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals through their expertise and funding. In Odisha, Cousin met the Chief Minister, Minister of Food Supplies and Consumer Welfare, Skills Development and Technical Education, Minister of School and Mass Education and Industries, Chief Secretary, as well as senior officials from the Government of Odisha. Cousin inaugurated WFP’s rice-fortification initiative at a central kitchen operated by the Akshaya Patra Foundation in Odisha. Rice enriched with iron is served to school children under the government’s Mid-Day Meal programme. The iron fortification decreases the prevalence of anaemia among children.   Cousin also visited a Fair-Price Shop, equipped with a biometric-enabled point-of-sales device designed to authenticate beneficiaries under India’s TPDS. In Fair-Price Shops, subsidized grain is sold as part of India's TPDS, which aims to provide around 800 million people with subsidized monthly household rations each year. WFP will continue to support the government in transforming the TPDS and enriching the nutritional content of the Mid-Day Meal programme through evidence-based pilot projects, the scale-up of innovative best practices in nutrition, and empowering beneficiaries of the government's food-based social security schemes.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin visits a project to fortify rice used in a Mid-Day Meal programme in schools in the city of Cuttack in India’s Odisha state.   Photo: WFP/Deepak Sabhachandani
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6233.00 kb
 
India, Gajapati, Odisha, 23 April 2014  In India, WFP has been working in close collaboration with the Government of India to support various food-based schemes since 1963. As India is now producing enough food for its domestic requirements, WFP has realigned its focus from being a food aid provider to a catalytic partner to the Government of India working towards strengthening existing food-based safety net programmes. This is done by providing technical assistance and capacity development as well as developing successful pilot projects that are scalable and adaptable to the diverse conditions found across India. With large numbers of malnourished people residing in India, WFP’s vision of ending hunger worldwide is unfeasible without significant impact in this country. Recognised strategies to address micronutrient malnutrition include dietary diversification, supplementation and food fortification. Of these, food fortification is a very effective strategy by which micronutrients are added to the most common foods leading to rapid improvements in the micronutrient status of various targeted population groups at a very reasonable cost and without need for any behaviour change on the part of the consumer. Iron fortification of rice supplied in school meals is one such strategy that can improve the micronutrient status of school children.   In order to boost school attendance and support the dietary requirements of children, the Government of India launched a national programme for nutrition support to education institutions nationwide – the MDM scheme.   Since its inception in 1995, the MDM scheme has developed into the world’s largest school feeding programme, which is now reaching out to about 12 crore (120 million) children in over 12 lakh (1.2 million) schools across the country. Under the scheme, freshly cooked mid day meals with a minimum content of 450 calories and 12 grams of proteins for lower primary school children and 700 calories and 20 grams of protein for upper primary school children are provided during the school day to children in classes one to eight in Government and Government aided schools. The aim is to address malnutrition among school children while creating a strong incentive - particularly for poorer families - to send their children to school.  Photo: WFP/Aditya Arya
IND_20140423_W....JPG
5000 x 3334 px 42.33 x 28.23 cm 2985.00 kb
 
India, Gajapati, Odisha, 23 April 2014  In India, WFP has been working in close collaboration with the Government of India to support various food-based schemes since 1963. As India is now producing enough food for its domestic requirements, WFP has realigned its focus from being a food aid provider to a catalytic partner to the Government of India working towards strengthening existing food-based safety net programmes. This is done by providing technical assistance and capacity development as well as developing successful pilot projects that are scalable and adaptable to the diverse conditions found across India. With large numbers of malnourished people residing in India, WFP’s vision of ending hunger worldwide is unfeasible without significant impact in this country. Recognised strategies to address micronutrient malnutrition include dietary diversification, supplementation and food fortification. Of these, food fortification is a very effective strategy by which micronutrients are added to the most common foods leading to rapid improvements in the micronutrient status of various targeted population groups at a very reasonable cost and without need for any behaviour change on the part of the consumer. Iron fortification of rice supplied in school meals is one such strategy that can improve the micronutrient status of school children.   In order to boost school attendance and support the dietary requirements of children, the Government of India launched a national programme for nutrition support to education institutions nationwide – the MDM scheme.   Since its inception in 1995, the MDM scheme has developed into the world’s largest school feeding programme, which is now reaching out to about 12 crore (120 million) children in over 12 lakh (1.2 million) schools across the country. Under the scheme, freshly cooked mid day meals with a minimum content of 450 calories and 12 grams of proteins for lower primary school children and 700 calories and 20 grams of protein for upper primary school children are provided during the school day to children in classes one to eight in Government and Government aided schools. The aim is to address malnutrition among school children while creating a strong incentive - particularly for poorer families - to send their children to school.  Photo: WFP/Aditya Arya
IND_20140423_W....JPG
3334 x 5000 px 28.23 x 42.33 cm 2790.00 kb
 
India, Gajapati, Odisha, 23 April 2014  In India, WFP has been working in close collaboration with the Government of India to support various food-based schemes since 1963. As India is now producing enough food for its domestic requirements, WFP has realigned its focus from being a food aid provider to a catalytic partner to the Government of India working towards strengthening existing food-based safety net programmes. This is done by providing technical assistance and capacity development as well as developing successful pilot projects that are scalable and adaptable to the diverse conditions found across India. With large numbers of malnourished people residing in India, WFP’s vision of ending hunger worldwide is unfeasible without significant impact in this country. Recognised strategies to address micronutrient malnutrition include dietary diversification, supplementation and food fortification. Of these, food fortification is a very effective strategy by which micronutrients are added to the most common foods leading to rapid improvements in the micronutrient status of various targeted population groups at a very reasonable cost and without need for any behaviour change on the part of the consumer. Iron fortification of rice supplied in school meals is one such strategy that can improve the micronutrient status of school children.   In order to boost school attendance and support the dietary requirements of children, the Government of India launched a national programme for nutrition support to education institutions nationwide – the MDM scheme.   Since its inception in 1995, the MDM scheme has developed into the world’s largest school feeding programme, which is now reaching out to about 12 crore (120 million) children in over 12 lakh (1.2 million) schools across the country. Under the scheme, freshly cooked mid day meals with a minimum content of 450 calories and 12 grams of proteins for lower primary school children and 700 calories and 20 grams of protein for upper primary school children are provided during the school day to children in classes one to eight in Government and Government aided schools. The aim is to address malnutrition among school children while creating a strong incentive - particularly for poorer families - to send their children to school.  Photo: WFP/Aditya Arya
IND_20140423_W....JPG
3334 x 5000 px 28.23 x 42.33 cm 1828.00 kb
 
India, Gajapati, Odisha, 23 April 2014  In India, WFP has been working in close collaboration with the Government of India to support various food-based schemes since 1963. As India is now producing enough food for its domestic requirements, WFP has realigned its focus from being a food aid provider to a catalytic partner to the Government of India working towards strengthening existing food-based safety net programmes. This is done by providing technical assistance and capacity development as well as developing successful pilot projects that are scalable and adaptable to the diverse conditions found across India. With large numbers of malnourished people residing in India, WFP’s vision of ending hunger worldwide is unfeasible without significant impact in this country. Recognised strategies to address micronutrient malnutrition include dietary diversification, supplementation and food fortification. Of these, food fortification is a very effective strategy by which micronutrients are added to the most common foods leading to rapid improvements in the micronutrient status of various targeted population groups at a very reasonable cost and without need for any behaviour change on the part of the consumer. Iron fortification of rice supplied in school meals is one such strategy that can improve the micronutrient status of school children.   In order to boost school attendance and support the dietary requirements of children, the Government of India launched a national programme for nutrition support to education institutions nationwide – the MDM scheme.   Since its inception in 1995, the MDM scheme has developed into the world’s largest school feeding programme, which is now reaching out to about 12 crore (120 million) children in over 12 lakh (1.2 million) schools across the country. Under the scheme, freshly cooked mid day meals with a minimum content of 450 calories and 12 grams of proteins for lower primary school children and 700 calories and 20 grams of protein for upper primary school children are provided during the school day to children in classes one to eight in Government and Government aided schools. The aim is to address malnutrition among school children while creating a strong incentive - particularly for poorer families - to send their children to school.  Photo: WFP/Aditya Arya
IND_20140423_W....JPG
3334 x 5000 px 28.23 x 42.33 cm 2823.00 kb
 
India, Gajapati, Odisha, 23 April 2014  In India, WFP has been working in close collaboration with the Government of India to support various food-based schemes since 1963. As India is now producing enough food for its domestic requirements, WFP has realigned its focus from being a food aid provider to a catalytic partner to the Government of India working towards strengthening existing food-based safety net programmes. This is done by providing technical assistance and capacity development as well as developing successful pilot projects that are scalable and adaptable to the diverse conditions found across India. With large numbers of malnourished people residing in India, WFP’s vision of ending hunger worldwide is unfeasible without significant impact in this country. Recognised strategies to address micronutrient malnutrition include dietary diversification, supplementation and food fortification. Of these, food fortification is a very effective strategy by which micronutrients are added to the most common foods leading to rapid improvements in the micronutrient status of various targeted population groups at a very reasonable cost and without need for any behaviour change on the part of the consumer. Iron fortification of rice supplied in school meals is one such strategy that can improve the micronutrient status of school children.   In order to boost school attendance and support the dietary requirements of children, the Government of India launched a national programme for nutrition support to education institutions nationwide – the MDM scheme.   Since its inception in 1995, the MDM scheme has developed into the world’s largest school feeding programme, which is now reaching out to about 12 crore (120 million) children in over 12 lakh (1.2 million) schools across the country. Under the scheme, freshly cooked mid day meals with a minimum content of 450 calories and 12 grams of proteins for lower primary school children and 700 calories and 20 grams of protein for upper primary school children are provided during the school day to children in classes one to eight in Government and Government aided schools. The aim is to address malnutrition among school children while creating a strong incentive - particularly for poorer families - to send their children to school.  Photo: WFP/Aditya Arya
IND_20140423_W....JPG
5000 x 3334 px 42.33 x 28.23 cm 2249.00 kb

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