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"(IPTC101 contains(iran))": 10 results 

 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: (from left) Nazanin (seven), Hamidreza (12) and Mohammadreza (10) at their home in Iran.  The children's father, Majid is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Their mother, Farzaneh is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 1597.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Majid begins sewing for a new dress in his workshop.  Majid is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 1722.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Majid shows a finished dress - sewn by himself and beaded by his wife, Farzaneh.  Majid is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
2000 x 3008 px 16.93 x 25.47 cm 1832.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Majid, Farzaneh and their four children at their home in Iran.  Majid is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 1774.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Farzaneh cooks in her kitchen at home.  Farzaneh's husband, Majid, is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh, is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 1696.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Farzaneh does bead-work on a dress sewn by her husband, Majid.  Farzaneh's husband, Majid, is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh, is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 1612.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: Farzaneh, with her seven-year-old daughter Nazanin, shows her bead-work.  Farzaneh's husband, Majid, is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Farzaneh, is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven, pictured) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
2000 x 3008 px 16.93 x 25.47 cm 1642.00 kb
 
Iran, 06 September 2016  With just under one million refugees, Iran hosts the 4th largest refugee population in the world. Continuing to be surrounded by conflicts in neighboring countries, Iran has required international assistance to cope with the continuous flow, particularly from Afghanistan. More than 951,000 refugees from Afghanistan were registered in Iran as of early 2016.  In 2016, WFP in Iran undertook a comprehensive Joint Assessment Mission in co-operation with the UN refugee agency, UNHCR to assess the food and non-food needs of refugees. WFP works to ensure basic food security for vulnerable Afghan families in refugee settlements in Iran, receiving rations and cash-based transfers depending on their needs.     In the photo: 12-year-old Hamidreza.  Hamidreza’s father, Majid, is 30-years-old and was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Majid’s father was killed in the war with Russia before he was born. He left Afghanistan for Iran when he was only 12.   Forced to live by himself, Majid worked at a butchery but did not enjoy his work. In 2010 he decided to learn tailoring and now earns his living as a tailor and dressmaker. His wife, Farzaneh, helps him by doing bead-working and stone embroideries on the dresses he makes.  Hamidreza’s mother, Farzaneh, is 27-years-old and was also born in Afghanistan. She, too, lost her father in the war with Russia – a loss from which she has never been able to fully recover. She left Afghanistan for Iran when she was five, with her uncle, grandmother and aunt who were seeking medical treatment. Her mother still lives in Afghanistan.   Married very young, Majid and Farzaneh are the proud parents to four children – Hamidreza (12, pictured), Mohammadreza (10), Nazanin (seven) and Alireza (two). They remember the births of their children as the happiest days of their lives. Both want to ensure that their children receive a good education, something Majid was deprived of in his own childhood, “I think about Afghanistan all the time…and picture the streets and alleys of Herat in my mind,” he says. Farzaneh particularly wishes their daughter, Nazanin, continue to study, saying “that is why I work so hard to bring them up well…I always encourage them to learn English. They have now accomplished two semesters successfully. They are top students at school, and help the family by selling socks on the streets.”  Farzaneh, who says she loves living in Iran, is a good cook – sometimes making Afghan cuisine as a memory of home. She considers herself to be in charge of the home – and definitely the boss in the kitchen!  Photo: WFP/Dara Darbandi
IRA_20160906_W....JPG
3008 x 2000 px 25.47 x 16.93 cm 3598.00 kb
 
Iran, Kermanshah, April 2003  The majority of Iraqi people live close to the Iranian border and a large number may cross because of possible war against Iraq; aid agencies are preparing to assist.  Several plots of land have been set aside by the Iranian government as potential settlements for up to 500,000 refugees.  WFP is in the process of pre-positioning emergency food rations in its Kermanshah warehouse, 550 kms northewest of the capital, Tehran. WFP has two warehouses in Kermanshah  with total capacity of 20,000 MT as well as a 10,000 MT warehouse in Ahwaz (900 Kms southwest).  Photo: WFP/Sahand Samadian
IRA_200304_WFP....jpg
2560 x 1920 px 21.67 x 16.26 cm 4616.00 kb
 
Iran, Kermanshah, April 2003  The majority of Iraqi people live close to the Iranian border and a large number may cross because of possible war against Iraq; aid agencies are preparing to assist.  Several plots of land have been set aside by the Iranian government as potential settlements for up to 500,000 refugees.  WFP is in the process of pre-positioning emergency food rations in its Kermanshah warehouse, 550 kms northewest of the capital, Tehran. WFP has two warehouses in Kermanshah  with total capacity of 20,000 MT as well as a 10,000 MT warehouse in Ahwaz (900 Kms southwest).  Photo: WFP/Sahand Samadian
IRA_200304_WFP....jpg
2560 x 1920 px 21.67 x 16.26 cm 4422.00 kb

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