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"(IPTC101 contains(jordan))": 2098 results 

 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Basel Smadi
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 3505.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Basel Smadi
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 3146.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Basel Smadi
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 24640.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Basel Smadi
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 12450.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Batah
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 4808.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Batah
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 4821.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Mohammed Batah
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 2948.00 kb
 
Jordan, Jalaad (Balqa Governorate), 22 February 2018  Some 200 trees were planted by 170 WFP Staff in Jalaad, as a way to support the Ministry of Agriculture's efforts to replenish the Balqa Governorate area.  The WFP's 170 staff members have joined forces to contribute to the protection of the local environment.  "It was a great opportunity to engage our staff in this activity as they got to experience what some of our WFP beneficiaries do in the field" said WFP Country Director Mageed Yahia during an interview with the media.  The personnel also proceeded to clean up the nearby Scandinavian forest, ridding it of the litter scattered by regular picnickers.  Photo: WFP/Basel Smadi
JOR_20180222_W....JPG
8688 x 5792 px 306.49 x 204.33 cm 2060.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5116.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4864.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6729.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8332.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4146.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7391.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6189.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5751.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  In the photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley (centre) with staff in front of a WFP plane on the runway at Marka Airport, Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped at high-altitudes in Syria in areas which are not accessible by land.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5940.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  In the photo: the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley gets off a WFP plane on the runway at Marka Airport, Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped at high-altitudes in Syria in areas which are not accessible by land.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4993.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  In the photo: a WFP plane on the runway at Marka Airport, Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped at high-altitudes in Syria in areas which are not accessible by land.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4714.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: a WFP staff member explains to the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (left) and WFP Executive Director David Beasley (centre) what WFP rations are inside packages which will be flown from Marka Airport in Jordan and airdropped in Syria.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4737.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: a WFP staff member explains to the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley what WFP rations are inside packages which will be flown from Marka Airport in Jordan and airdropped in Syria.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4776.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: a WFP staff member explains to the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley what WFP rations are inside packages which will be flown from Marka Airport in Jordan and airdropped in Syria.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5073.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: a WFP staff member explains to the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley what WFP rations are inside packages which will be flown from Marka Airport in Jordan and airdropped in Syria.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5076.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: the US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley inspects bags of rations which will be flown from Marka Airport in Jordan and airdropped in Syria.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5229.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, Marka Airport, 21 May 2017  WFP Executive Director David Beasley visited Marka Airport in Amman, from where WFP food rations are flown and airdropped in Syria.  In the photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley (second from left) and US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (second from right) talk to WFP aviation staff at Marka Airport in Jordan.  Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa
JOR_20170521_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5274.00 kb

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