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Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Rosebellah Iminza is a 16-year-old student, studying at Nginda high school in central Kenya where she just joined form one. For this teenager, this has been a long journey. Born in Kakamega, western Kenya in 2002, Rosebellah was brought up by her grandmother in her early years. Her dad had died while she was too young to understand and her mother deserted her. “I had two sisters, one older and one younger, but my grandmother was also taking care of two of her own children who were disabled,” Rosebellah explains. “She couldn’t provide for us — she couldn’t feed or clothe us.”  At the age of just six, Rosebellah was separated from her sisters “One of our aunts volunteered to take care of my older sister while a cousin took me in,” she says. “Our baby sister was left with our grandmother. I’ve never seen any of them again.” Rosebellah moved in with her cousin in Eldoret town, about 100 kilometers away from her rural home. “By the time I was in class five, my cousin was really struggling financially,” says Rosebellah. “I was becoming a burden to the family.” In 2014, the family moved to Nairobi in search of a better life. “We settled in Kawangware [an informal settlement west of Nairobi] but my cousin kept on asking me to find another place to stay,” says Rosebellah. “I did not know anyone or any place in Nairobi.” Rosebellah continued living with her cousin’s family and helping them with their small business. By this time she had dropped out of school.  Things then took an unexpected turn. Rosebellah explains: “One evening, my cousin sent me to the shops to buy eggs. It was late and most kiosks had closed. I walked for a long time. When I got back to the house, it was locked — my cousin and his family were gone. That night, I stayed at a neighbour’s house. The following morning, I was taken to the chief’s office — the chief brought me to a children’s home in Kibera.” Rosebellah found herself in an orphanage under Makina Community Development Project (MACODEP) in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. “I was happy to have a place to stay,” she says. The children’s home placed Rosebellah in Stara Rescue Centre and School.   Based on her age and intellect, she was admitted in class six. As they say, the rest is history.  “At Stara, life was amazing. We had porridge in the morning, githeri [mix of maize and beans] and sometimes rice and beans, and fruits for lunch,” says Rosebellah. “I would go to class with my belly full — something I had not experienced before.” Rosebellah studied hard and could fully concentrate during lessons. By the time she was in class seven, she was already among the top five students. Her performance earned her recognition. “I got my first present ever — it was very exciting,” she says. “At Stara, the teachers even remember and celebrate kids’ birthdays with candy! It was the first time someone ever celebrated my birthday.”  Rosebellah is grateful to the founder of the orphanage — Andrew Otieno — a man she calls ‘uncle’ for giving her a home; to Stara school for giving her a grounding education; to the World Food Programme for providing her with a school lunch; and to the Kenya Education Fund for paying for her high school education. “There is no way I can repay all those that have helped me — all I can do is work hard. When I graduate from high school, I want to study law,” says Rosebellah. “I want to defend the rights of children — I did not get a good upbringing and no child should go through that — I want to help other disadvantaged children.” Rosebellah spent much of her mid-term break serving children at Stara porridge or lunch. She says she will continue volunteering here during school holidays as well as helping younger children at the orphanage with school work.  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  In the Photo: Rosebellah Iminza took time over the mid-term break to return to her old school and serve lunch to the children.  Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6735.00 kb
 
Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Rosebellah Iminza is a 16-year-old student, studying at Nginda high school in central Kenya where she just joined form one. For this teenager, this has been a long journey. Born in Kakamega, western Kenya in 2002, Rosebellah was brought up by her grandmother in her early years. Her dad had died while she was too young to understand and her mother deserted her. “I had two sisters, one older and one younger, but my grandmother was also taking care of two of her own children who were disabled,” Rosebellah explains. “She couldn’t provide for us — she couldn’t feed or clothe us.”  At the age of just six, Rosebellah was separated from her sisters “One of our aunts volunteered to take care of my older sister while a cousin took me in,” she says. “Our baby sister was left with our grandmother. I’ve never seen any of them again.” Rosebellah moved in with her cousin in Eldoret town, about 100 kilometers away from her rural home. “By the time I was in class five, my cousin was really struggling financially,” says Rosebellah. “I was becoming a burden to the family.” In 2014, the family moved to Nairobi in search of a better life. “We settled in Kawangware [an informal settlement west of Nairobi] but my cousin kept on asking me to find another place to stay,” says Rosebellah. “I did not know anyone or any place in Nairobi.” Rosebellah continued living with her cousin’s family and helping them with their small business. By this time she had dropped out of school.  Things then took an unexpected turn. Rosebellah explains: “One evening, my cousin sent me to the shops to buy eggs. It was late and most kiosks had closed. I walked for a long time. When I got back to the house, it was locked — my cousin and his family were gone. That night, I stayed at a neighbour’s house. The following morning, I was taken to the chief’s office — the chief brought me to a children’s home in Kibera.” Rosebellah found herself in an orphanage under Makina Community Development Project (MACODEP) in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. “I was happy to have a place to stay,” she says. The children’s home placed Rosebellah in Stara Rescue Centre and School.   Based on her age and intellect, she was admitted in class six. As they say, the rest is history.  “At Stara, life was amazing. We had porridge in the morning, githeri [mix of maize and beans] and sometimes rice and beans, and fruits for lunch,” says Rosebellah. “I would go to class with my belly full — something I had not experienced before.” Rosebellah studied hard and could fully concentrate during lessons. By the time she was in class seven, she was already among the top five students. Her performance earned her recognition. “I got my first present ever — it was very exciting,” she says. “At Stara, the teachers even remember and celebrate kids’ birthdays with candy! It was the first time someone ever celebrated my birthday.”  Rosebellah is grateful to the founder of the orphanage — Andrew Otieno — a man she calls ‘uncle’ for giving her a home; to Stara school for giving her a grounding education; to the World Food Programme for providing her with a school lunch; and to the Kenya Education Fund for paying for her high school education. “There is no way I can repay all those that have helped me — all I can do is work hard. When I graduate from high school, I want to study law,” says Rosebellah. “I want to defend the rights of children — I did not get a good upbringing and no child should go through that — I want to help other disadvantaged children.” Rosebellah spent much of her mid-term break serving children at Stara porridge or lunch. She says she will continue volunteering here during school holidays as well as helping younger children at the orphanage with school work.  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  In the Photo: Rosebellah Iminza.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6589.00 kb
 
Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Rosebellah Iminza is a 16-year-old student, studying at Nginda high school in central Kenya where she just joined form one. For this teenager, this has been a long journey. Born in Kakamega, western Kenya in 2002, Rosebellah was brought up by her grandmother in her early years. Her dad had died while she was too young to understand and her mother deserted her. “I had two sisters, one older and one younger, but my grandmother was also taking care of two of her own children who were disabled,” Rosebellah explains. “She couldn’t provide for us — she couldn’t feed or clothe us.”  At the age of just six, Rosebellah was separated from her sisters “One of our aunts volunteered to take care of my older sister while a cousin took me in,” she says. “Our baby sister was left with our grandmother. I’ve never seen any of them again.” Rosebellah moved in with her cousin in Eldoret town, about 100 kilometers away from her rural home. “By the time I was in class five, my cousin was really struggling financially,” says Rosebellah. “I was becoming a burden to the family.” In 2014, the family moved to Nairobi in search of a better life. “We settled in Kawangware [an informal settlement west of Nairobi] but my cousin kept on asking me to find another place to stay,” says Rosebellah. “I did not know anyone or any place in Nairobi.” Rosebellah continued living with her cousin’s family and helping them with their small business. By this time she had dropped out of school.  Things then took an unexpected turn. Rosebellah explains: “One evening, my cousin sent me to the shops to buy eggs. It was late and most kiosks had closed. I walked for a long time. When I got back to the house, it was locked — my cousin and his family were gone. That night, I stayed at a neighbour’s house. The following morning, I was taken to the chief’s office — the chief brought me to a children’s home in Kibera.” Rosebellah found herself in an orphanage under Makina Community Development Project (MACODEP) in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. “I was happy to have a place to stay,” she says. The children’s home placed Rosebellah in Stara Rescue Centre and School.   Based on her age and intellect, she was admitted in class six. As they say, the rest is history.  “At Stara, life was amazing. We had porridge in the morning, githeri [mix of maize and beans] and sometimes rice and beans, and fruits for lunch,” says Rosebellah. “I would go to class with my belly full — something I had not experienced before.” Rosebellah studied hard and could fully concentrate during lessons. By the time she was in class seven, she was already among the top five students. Her performance earned her recognition. “I got my first present ever — it was very exciting,” she says. “At Stara, the teachers even remember and celebrate kids’ birthdays with candy! It was the first time someone ever celebrated my birthday.”  Rosebellah is grateful to the founder of the orphanage — Andrew Otieno — a man she calls ‘uncle’ for giving her a home; to Stara school for giving her a grounding education; to the World Food Programme for providing her with a school lunch; and to the Kenya Education Fund for paying for her high school education. “There is no way I can repay all those that have helped me — all I can do is work hard. When I graduate from high school, I want to study law,” says Rosebellah. “I want to defend the rights of children — I did not get a good upbringing and no child should go through that — I want to help other disadvantaged children.” Rosebellah spent much of her mid-term break serving children at Stara porridge or lunch. She says she will continue volunteering here during school holidays as well as helping younger children at the orphanage with school work.  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  In the Photo: Rosebellah Iminza (left) is happy to be back at school.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6879.00 kb
 
Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Rosebellah Iminza is a 16-year-old student, studying at Nginda high school in central Kenya where she just joined form one. For this teenager, this has been a long journey. Born in Kakamega, western Kenya in 2002, Rosebellah was brought up by her grandmother in her early years. Her dad had died while she was too young to understand and her mother deserted her. “I had two sisters, one older and one younger, but my grandmother was also taking care of two of her own children who were disabled,” Rosebellah explains. “She couldn’t provide for us — she couldn’t feed or clothe us.”  At the age of just six, Rosebellah was separated from her sisters “One of our aunts volunteered to take care of my older sister while a cousin took me in,” she says. “Our baby sister was left with our grandmother. I’ve never seen any of them again.” Rosebellah moved in with her cousin in Eldoret town, about 100 kilometers away from her rural home. “By the time I was in class five, my cousin was really struggling financially,” says Rosebellah. “I was becoming a burden to the family.” In 2014, the family moved to Nairobi in search of a better life. “We settled in Kawangware [an informal settlement west of Nairobi] but my cousin kept on asking me to find another place to stay,” says Rosebellah. “I did not know anyone or any place in Nairobi.” Rosebellah continued living with her cousin’s family and helping them with their small business. By this time she had dropped out of school.  Things then took an unexpected turn. Rosebellah explains: “One evening, my cousin sent me to the shops to buy eggs. It was late and most kiosks had closed. I walked for a long time. When I got back to the house, it was locked — my cousin and his family were gone. That night, I stayed at a neighbour’s house. The following morning, I was taken to the chief’s office — the chief brought me to a children’s home in Kibera.” Rosebellah found herself in an orphanage under Makina Community Development Project (MACODEP) in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. “I was happy to have a place to stay,” she says. The children’s home placed Rosebellah in Stara Rescue Centre and School.   Based on her age and intellect, she was admitted in class six. As they say, the rest is history.  “At Stara, life was amazing. We had porridge in the morning, githeri [mix of maize and beans] and sometimes rice and beans, and fruits for lunch,” says Rosebellah. “I would go to class with my belly full — something I had not experienced before.” Rosebellah studied hard and could fully concentrate during lessons. By the time she was in class seven, she was already among the top five students. Her performance earned her recognition. “I got my first present ever — it was very exciting,” she says. “At Stara, the teachers even remember and celebrate kids’ birthdays with candy! It was the first time someone ever celebrated my birthday.”  Rosebellah is grateful to the founder of the orphanage — Andrew Otieno — a man she calls ‘uncle’ for giving her a home; to Stara school for giving her a grounding education; to the World Food Programme for providing her with a school lunch; and to the Kenya Education Fund for paying for her high school education. “There is no way I can repay all those that have helped me — all I can do is work hard. When I graduate from high school, I want to study law,” says Rosebellah. “I want to defend the rights of children — I did not get a good upbringing and no child should go through that — I want to help other disadvantaged children.” Rosebellah spent much of her mid-term break serving children at Stara porridge or lunch. She says she will continue volunteering here during school holidays as well as helping younger children at the orphanage with school work.  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  In the Photo: Rosebellah Iminza.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6848.00 kb
 
Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Rosebellah Iminza is a 16-year-old student, studying at Nginda high school in central Kenya where she just joined form one. For this teenager, this has been a long journey. Born in Kakamega, western Kenya in 2002, Rosebellah was brought up by her grandmother in her early years. Her dad had died while she was too young to understand and her mother deserted her. “I had two sisters, one older and one younger, but my grandmother was also taking care of two of her own children who were disabled,” Rosebellah explains. “She couldn’t provide for us — she couldn’t feed or clothe us.”  At the age of just six, Rosebellah was separated from her sisters “One of our aunts volunteered to take care of my older sister while a cousin took me in,” she says. “Our baby sister was left with our grandmother. I’ve never seen any of them again.” Rosebellah moved in with her cousin in Eldoret town, about 100 kilometers away from her rural home. “By the time I was in class five, my cousin was really struggling financially,” says Rosebellah. “I was becoming a burden to the family.” In 2014, the family moved to Nairobi in search of a better life. “We settled in Kawangware [an informal settlement west of Nairobi] but my cousin kept on asking me to find another place to stay,” says Rosebellah. “I did not know anyone or any place in Nairobi.” Rosebellah continued living with her cousin’s family and helping them with their small business. By this time she had dropped out of school.  Things then took an unexpected turn. Rosebellah explains: “One evening, my cousin sent me to the shops to buy eggs. It was late and most kiosks had closed. I walked for a long time. When I got back to the house, it was locked — my cousin and his family were gone. That night, I stayed at a neighbour’s house. The following morning, I was taken to the chief’s office — the chief brought me to a children’s home in Kibera.” Rosebellah found herself in an orphanage under Makina Community Development Project (MACODEP) in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. “I was happy to have a place to stay,” she says. The children’s home placed Rosebellah in Stara Rescue Centre and School.   Based on her age and intellect, she was admitted in class six. As they say, the rest is history.  “At Stara, life was amazing. We had porridge in the morning, githeri [mix of maize and beans] and sometimes rice and beans, and fruits for lunch,” says Rosebellah. “I would go to class with my belly full — something I had not experienced before.” Rosebellah studied hard and could fully concentrate during lessons. By the time she was in class seven, she was already among the top five students. Her performance earned her recognition. “I got my first present ever — it was very exciting,” she says. “At Stara, the teachers even remember and celebrate kids’ birthdays with candy! It was the first time someone ever celebrated my birthday.”  Rosebellah is grateful to the founder of the orphanage — Andrew Otieno — a man she calls ‘uncle’ for giving her a home; to Stara school for giving her a grounding education; to the World Food Programme for providing her with a school lunch; and to the Kenya Education Fund for paying for her high school education. “There is no way I can repay all those that have helped me — all I can do is work hard. When I graduate from high school, I want to study law,” says Rosebellah. “I want to defend the rights of children — I did not get a good upbringing and no child should go through that — I want to help other disadvantaged children.” Rosebellah spent much of her mid-term break serving children at Stara porridge or lunch. She says she will continue volunteering here during school holidays as well as helping younger children at the orphanage with school work.  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  In the Photo: Rosebellah Iminza.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4992.00 kb
 
Kenya, Nairobi, 02 March 2018  Stara Rescue Centre is one of the 91 schools that are receiving cash from the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy food from the local markets for school meals. WFP currently gives a hot lunch to about 80,000 pupils spread across Nairobi’s informal settlements each school day.  Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3072 px 193.04 x 108.37 cm 4352.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: A woman carrying a baby at the Chepkoryande water pan in Baringo. This village’s most pressing need was water – for livestock and home use.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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4632 x 2608 px 163.41 x 92.00 cm 6935.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Chepkoryande water pan in Baringo County.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180221_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6350.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Chepkoryande water pan in Baringo County.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180221_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 9313.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: A woman inspects a bee hive in Baringo County. Bees require a source of water to thrive and make honey.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180221_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 9018.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: A bee hive in Baringo County. Bees require a source of water to thrive and make honey.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180221_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6784.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: A community-dug water pan in Baringo County. WFP has helped the community excavate the water pan, fence it off, and installed a watering trough and a tap stand.  Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
KEN_20180221_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 8126.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Community members draw water from a tap stand in Baringo County. WFP has helped the community excavate a water pan and installed a watering trough and a tap stand.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7080.00 kb
 
Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Livestock drink from a water trough in Baringo County. WFP has helped the community excavate a water pan and installed a watering trough and a tap stand.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Livestock drink from a water trough in Baringo County. WFP has helped the community excavate a water pan and installed a watering trough and a tap stand.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Livestock drink from a water trough in Baringo County. WFP has helped the community excavate a water pan and installed a watering trough and a tap stand.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Livestock drink from a water trough at the Chepkoryande water pan in Baringo County.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Kimorock, Rift Valley Province. 21 February 2018.  Perkerra and Endao rivers were the only sources of water for families living in Kimorock village near Marigat town in Baringo County; both rivers are more than 10 kilometres away from the village, a two-hour walk each way. When the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) introduced asset creation activities in Baringo, it was easy for the community to agree on what they needed most — access to water that was near the village.  In asset creation, WFP works with families to build or repair communal or house-hold assets that in turn help produce more food, including for sale.  In 2015, funding from donors helped WFP assist the Chepkoryande community excavate a second larger water basin through the use of earth-moving machines. The community helped protect the embankments of the new water basin by planting grass all round to prevent soil erosion. In addition, WFP supported the fencing of the water basin and installation of a tap stand, a watering trough for animals and the construction of washrooms. Water flows to the access points passing through a filtering system.  In the Photo: Livestock drink from a water trough at the Chepkoryande water pan in Baringo County.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 20 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: A beneficiary displays new hand tools given by WFP to enable the community undertake asset creation activities.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 20 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Asset creation beneficiaries with newly distributed farm tools in Baringo County.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 20 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Priscah Sang, 30-year-old mother of 7, has found a lucrative business in growing the drought-tolerant African foxtail grass, in the arid Baringo County. She sells hay for a living  Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 20 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Priscah Sang, 30-year-old mother of 7, has found a lucrative business in growing the drought-tolerant African foxtail grass, in the arid Baringo County. She sells hay for a living  Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 20 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Priscah Sang, 30-year-old mother of 7, has found a lucrative business in growing the drought-tolerant African foxtail grass, in the arid Baringo County. She sells hay for a living.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 19 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Mary Keitan, a 39-year-old mother of seven in Baringo, west of Nairobi, shows part of her butternut harvest. In 2017, she lost more than half of the harvest to drought.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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Kenya, Baringo, Rift Valley Province. 19 February 2018.  In Kenya, the people most vulnerable to food insecurity live in urban informal settlementsand in the arid and semi-arid regions that make up 80 percent of the country’s land area. A quarter of the population lives in these regions, which suffer from poverty, structural underdevelopment, conflict and disease. Droughts and unpredictable rain patterns exacerbate the situation, and 47 percent of the country’s overall population lives below the poverty line.  WFP supports communities in building or repairing assets such as small dams, terraces, water pans, irrigation systems, fodder fields and tree farms. This promotes longer-term resilience by increasing agricultural productivity and allowing communities to grow more food, diversify incomes, keep livestock healthy and protect the environment. WFP’s asset creation activities are a key element of support for the Government’s Ending Drought Emergency Plan.  In the Photo: Mary Keitan, a 39-year-old mother of seven in Baringo, west of Nairobi, shows part of her butternut harvest. In 2017, she lost more than half of the harvest to drought.   Photo: WFP/Martin Karimi
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