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"(IPTC101 contains(kyrgyzstan))": 991 results 

 
Kyrgyzstan, Naryn Region, Kochkor, 20 November 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A group of rural women in Kochkor felt and embroider shyrdaks (traditional carpets) at the WFP-supported training. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1314.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Naryn Region, Kochkor, 20 November 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A group of rural women in Kochkor felt and embroider shyrdaks (traditional carpets) at the WFP-supported training. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1316.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Issyk-Kul Region, Karakol, 20 November 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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4897 x 3267 px 41.46 x 27.66 cm 3910.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh, 27 October 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supports creation of productive assets including fisheries to improve income generation opportunities and livelihoods of the most vulnerable rural communities. It also boosts local economies through job creation and improved nutrition.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 732.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh, 27 October 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supports creation of productive assets including fisheries to improve income generation opportunities and livelihoods of the most vulnerable rural communities. It also boosts local economies through job creation and improved nutrition.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20161027_W....JPG
2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 2499.00 kb
 
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Kyrgyzstan, Osh, 27 October 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supports creation of productive assets including fisheries to improve income generation opportunities and livelihoods of the most vulnerable rural communities. It also boosts local economies through job creation and improved nutrition.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3264 x 2448 px 115.15 x 86.36 cm 3240.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh Region, Aravan District, 30 May 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.  Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Thanks to funding from Japan, WFP launched an innovative project to support rural women farmers. As part of this project, Ulpetkhon Baltabaeva from Aravan received support to plant a 300-tree peach garden.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3932 x 2621 px 138.71 x 92.46 cm 2182.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 14 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3370 x 2247 px 118.89 x 79.27 cm 1953.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 14 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3370 x 2247 px 118.89 x 79.27 cm 2220.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 09 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 7771.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 09 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 9874.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 09 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150409_W....JPG
3932 x 2621 px 138.71 x 92.46 cm 2048.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 09 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development, such as these students at Mamytov Primary School.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150409_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 8102.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh District, 09 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: Thanks to WFP's school meals, children in Mamytov Primary School have energy and motivation to learn. Here, students count on their fingers to solve problems in maths class.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150409_W....JPG
2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1039.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Batken Region, Kadamjay District, 08 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150408_W....JPG
3370 x 2247 px 118.89 x 79.27 cm 1548.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Batken Region, Kadamjay District, 08 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150408_W....JPG
2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1168.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Batken Region, Kadamjay District, 08 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3932 x 2621 px 138.71 x 92.46 cm 1670.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Batken Region, Kadamjay District, 08 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: Every single day, over 70,000 buns are freshly baked for school lunches in some 270 WFP-supported schools. All the wheat flour, fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, is provided by the Russian Federation.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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3370 x 2247 px 118.89 x 79.27 cm 1540.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 08 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150408_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 8894.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 07 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20150407_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 8403.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 07 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 5678.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 07 April 2015  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 5441.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Naryn, 07 September 2014  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.  Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Anemia and micronutrient deficiencies are wide spread in the Kyrgyz Republic, where monotonous diets of mainly starch products are common. Through WFP projects such as vegetable gardening, people can improve their nutrition with fresh produce and generate income by selling the harvest surplus.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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4608 x 3072 px 39.01 x 26.01 cm 4612.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Issyk-Kul, 20 August 2014  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: Teachers in WFP-supported primary schools in Kyrgyz emphasize that children do better in class after eating nutritious school lunches. This 1st grade student gets As for his writing and drawing classwork.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, Issyk-Kul, 19 August 2014  In 2013, WFP launched a four-year project to help the Kyrgyz government improve the efficiency and quality of its school meals programme. We are offering the Ministries of Health and Education policy support to feed students in a sustainable and cost-efficient manner.  WFP is also implementing pilots to introduce nutritious meals in more than 260 school across the country, renovate school canteens and improve sanitation facilities. Some 62,000 students now receive daily nutritious meals that include soups or milk-based porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. Schools revise their menus every 2 to 3 weeks to ensure children receive diverse meals. To help school chefs, WFP developed over 140 recipes for school lunches.   As well as providing a variety of meals, the programme supplies school kitchens with equipment, trains school cooks, and helps schools start vegetable gardens for fresh, healthy ingredients. Given the success of the programme, the government is already replicating the WFP model elsewhere.  In the photo: WFP's Primary School Meals Programme helps to ensure school-aged children in the Kyrgyz Republic have the energy for intellectual and physical development.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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