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"(IPTC101 contains(lebanon))": 1632 results 

 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Pickles, jams, sauces and cheeses are just some of the products packaged on show.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1139.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Susanne, a beneficiary of the project. She admitted that the admin side of the six weeks was tough, but is just as important as processing because customers will not return if they are not happy.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5198 x 3466 px 44.01 x 29.35 cm 733.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Pickles, jams, sauces and cheeses are just some of the products packaged on show.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1156.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Kawthar and her fellow classmates learned that a strong supply chain involves numerous components beyond just making food.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2985.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Since she arrived in Lebanon from Syria four years ago, Amra has struggled to get by. Being a refugee, her opportunities to earn a living are limited. Also, taking care of her children has been her priority and meant that she was unable to leave home to find seasonal work in the Bekaa fields. Since graduating from this programme however, she has found a way to stay at home with her daughters and to generate a little income on the side.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2463.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Myriam shows off her tomato sauce and labneh.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3723.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: Karla, one of the students in the programme.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1123.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: Twelve-year-old Ibrahim is one of the 17,000 students in the programme.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171017_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1131.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: A boy drinking milk.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1878.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: Women and men are involved in WFP’s food for assets programmes in Lebanon like this one in Hermel. Participants who are working on canal cleaning and rehabilitation receive a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1702.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: In Hermel, north Lebanon, WFP is running several canal cleaning and rehabilitation activities under a food for assets programme. Projects like these benefit the entire local community and are designed with the municipality.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3814.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: A Lebanese beneficiary on a canal cleaning and rehabilitation food for assets programme in Hermel, north Lebanon. He receives a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2937.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Ain, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: WFP’s Food for Assets projects across Lebanon give a boost to people and entire communities in the short and long terms. 65 Lebanese and Syrian participants are working to construct a water channel in Ain in the north to take water from a natural spring down a hill, passing by dozens of small orchards where farmers can use the water for their land.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5567 x 3712 px 47.13 x 31.43 cm 1455.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Ain, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: WFP’s Food for Assets projects across Lebanon give a boost to people and entire communities in the short and long terms. 65 Lebanese and Syrian participants are working to construct a water channel in Ain in the north to take water from a natural spring down a hill, passing by dozens of small orchards where farmers can use the water for their land.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171005_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1828.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Ain, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: WFP’s Food for Assets projects across Lebanon give a boost to people and entire communities in the short and long terms. 65 Lebanese and Syrian participants are working to construct a water channel in Ain in the north to take water from a natural spring down a hill, passing by dozens of small orchards where farmers can use the water for their land.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5636 x 3758 px 47.72 x 31.82 cm 1788.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Ain, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: WFP’s Food for Assets projects across Lebanon give a boost to people and entire communities in the short and long terms. 65 Lebanese and Syrian participants are working to construct a water channel in Ain in the north to take water from a natural spring down a hill, passing by dozens of small orchards where farmers can use the water for their land.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171005_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2114.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Baalbeck, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: Two Syrian female beneficiaries on a storm drain construction project in Baalbeck, north east Lebanon. As food for assets participants, they receive a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2495.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Baalbeck, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: a Syrian beneficiary on a storm drain construction project in Baalbeck, north east Lebanon. He is a participant within a food for assets activity there and receives a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1368.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Tripoli, 26 September 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: One of WFP’s food for training programmes in Lebanon’s Tripoli involves Lebanese and Syrian women participants learning about food hygiene, preparation and preservation techniques.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1473.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Tripoli, 26 September 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: “I joined this programme for two reasons: to learn how to cook more healthy food for my kids and to gain skills to enter the food industry. I’m doing the training but it’s for my kids – I need to give them the best future possible.” Rosa, a Syrian refugee and mother of seven, is taking part in WFP’s Food for Training project in Tripoli, Lebanon. She’s learning about food hygiene, preparation and preservation techniques along with 23 other women from both Lebanon and Syria. The training is funded by Germany's BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1366.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 7 September 2017.  Through a series of intensive computer-based trainings in collaboration with the American University of Beirut (AUB) and WFP’s Innovation Accelerator, Lebanese and Syrian participants learned a variety of portable digital skills in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) pilot programme in Beirut.  Anas was the first graduate of the programme and after graduating from the pilot basic course he moved straight into the advanced class. There, he built his digital literacy and image annotation skills — assigning key words to digital images — then focusing on app and web development.  Now Anas is about to launch an app which allows image annotation on the move. Anas is opening up the app to companies around the world which need image annotation and so far he has worked with agencies in Russia and America even though he expects his app to go global once launched.  In the photo: Anas, the first graduate of the WFP’s programme in portable digital skills.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20170907_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 984.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 7 September 2017.  Through a series of intensive computer-based trainings in collaboration with the American University of Beirut (AUB) and WFP’s Innovation Accelerator, Lebanese and Syrian participants learned a variety of portable digital skills in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) pilot programme in Beirut.  Anas was the first graduate of the programme and after graduating from the pilot basic course he moved straight into the advanced class. There, he built his digital literacy and image annotation skills — assigning key words to digital images — then focusing on app and web development.  Now Anas is about to launch an app which allows image annotation on the move. Anas is opening up the app to companies around the world which need image annotation and so far he has worked with agencies in Russia and America even though he expects his app to go global once launched.  In the photo: Anas, the first graduate of the WFP’s programme in portable digital skills.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20170907_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1275.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 7 September 2017.  Through a series of intensive computer-based trainings in collaboration with the American University of Beirut (AUB) and WFP’s Innovation Accelerator, Lebanese and Syrian participants learned a variety of portable digital skills in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) pilot programme in Beirut.  Anas was the first graduate of the programme and after graduating from the pilot basic course he moved straight into the advanced class. There, he built his digital literacy and image annotation skills — assigning key words to digital images — then focusing on app and web development.  Now Anas is about to launch an app which allows image annotation on the move. Anas is opening up the app to companies around the world which need image annotation and so far he has worked with agencies in Russia and America even though he expects his app to go global once launched.  In the photo: Anas, the first graduate of the WFP’s programme in portable digital skills.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20170907_W....JPG
4489 x 2993 px 38.01 x 25.34 cm 550.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Wadi Khaled, Akkar Governorate. 24 August 2017.  Nine hundred children in Wadi Khaled’s Amayer and Rajem Issa villages walk to school and for them it is a perilous journey. The school is on a road half way up a steep hill overlooking Syria. There is no path, you cannot see around the corner and there is a sheer drop on one side.  Over the coming three months, the World Food Programme (WFP) and its local partner Danish Refugee Council (DRC) are running a construction project to fix those problems. The 35 participants have been trained in construction and asset rehabilitation techniques, transferrable skills which can be used later on at similar infrastructure projects wherever they may be.  In the photo: Participants are paving a 1.2km pacth and fencing off a steep drop.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20170824_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3333.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Wadi Khaled, Akkar Governorate. 24 August 2017.  Nine hundred children in Wadi Khaled’s Amayer and Rajem Issa villages walk to school and for them it is a perilous journey. The school is on a road half way up a steep hill overlooking Syria. There is no path, you cannot see around the corner and there is a sheer drop on one side.  Over the coming three months, the World Food Programme (WFP) and its local partner Danish Refugee Council (DRC) are running a construction project to fix those problems. The 35 participants have been trained in construction and asset rehabilitation techniques, transferrable skills which can be used later on at similar infrastructure projects wherever they may be.  In the photo: Rafaa is one of the 12 female participants in this project.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20170824_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1040.00 kb

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