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"(IPTC101 contains(lebanon))": 1665 results 

 
Lebanon, Beirut, 11 July 2018  Each year, WFP runs summer nutrition camps across Lebanon. Children are invited from the 39 schools participating in WFP’s regular term-time snack programme where they receive a small bag each day containing fresh fruit and milk. At the camps, students learn about good nutrition practices in a fun environment. The camps are run by local partner IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities) and fully funded by the Italian government.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180711_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 2634.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 11 July 2018  Each year, WFP runs summer nutrition camps across Lebanon. Children are invited from the 39 schools participating in WFP’s regular term-time snack programme where they receive a small bag each day containing fresh fruit and milk. At the camps, students learn about good nutrition practices in a fun environment. The camps are run by local partner IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities) and fully funded by the Italian government.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180711_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 2566.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 11 July 2018  Each year, WFP runs summer nutrition camps across Lebanon. Children are invited from the 39 schools participating in WFP’s regular term-time snack programme where they receive a small bag each day containing fresh fruit and milk. At the camps, students learn about good nutrition practices in a fun environment. The camps are run by local partner IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities) and fully funded by the Italian government.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180711_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 3645.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
1086 x 724 px 38.31 x 25.54 cm 159.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2814.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  In the Photo: US$2 a month helps to maintain communication with Fadwa’s family and friends  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
3840 x 5760 px 135.47 x 203.20 cm 1289.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2692.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2418.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3258.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 27 June 2018  Fadwa still lives in a makeshift shelter in the corner of a car park in Beirut. In January, it was leaking and cold. Now the air doesn’t circulate and it’s unbearably muggy. Cars race past one side of the structure and her children scoot around on broken bikes in the car park. It’s still inadequate and hazardous, yet Fadwa is smiling.  Back in January, she had to go to the market everyday to buy food because there was nowhere to store it. Now she has a fridge — it’s her biggest purchase this year. By saving some of her cash and adding more from her husband’s income, Fadwa was able to save enough money to buy a second-hand fridge. She is now able to buy and store a wider range of fresh food, thanks to support provided by the United Kingdom.  During its most recent assessment, WFP found a 13 percent increase (up to 74 percent) in the number of families with an acceptable food consumption score. That score is an index measurement of the range of food groups eaten by a family.  There are two shelves of brown bottles in the fridge. It is medicine for the children's various ailments. “I always have one sick child,” she explained. Back in January, she had to cut down on food in order to afford medicine. Now she has both.  Being able to choose where to spent limited funds is a huge improvement for Fadwa and the core component of WFP’s multi-purpose cash programme. With the monthly US$27 (£20) that each member of the family receives plus a US$175 (£130) top up, Fadwa is taking charge of meeting the family’s needs for the first time since they left Syria.  The multi-purpose cash programme which is largely funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), gives recipients the autonomy to decide where and how to spend their humanitarian assistance.  When we last met Fadwa, she told us that food is her first priority. WFP learned the same of other families receiving multi-purpose cash in Lebanon. 91 percent of families receiving it prioritised food.  Fadwa always knew where to find the best deals with the help of a network of friends and family spread around Beirut. They keep in touch by WhatsApp, sharing updates from Syria as well as tips on where to find the best deals around town. Now with a couple of dollars each month, she is able to keep that link open with home.  A bit of extra cash reserved for tutoring costs has also been freed up now that the summer vacation started. Four of the five children are in school and 14-year-old Moutaz was receiving private lessons. Since he caught up with his class and passed his English exam this semester, they are no longer paying for the teacher. As well as giving Moutaz something to be proud of, the family now has a bit more cash to save for whatever tomorrow brings.  “There’s always a bill for something,” Fadwa explained, “but now I can pay them.”  The family is getting by and is appreciative for the extra help from the United Kingdom. When asked, 98 percent of all families said they prefer receiving cash over other forms of assistance. But life is still exhausting Fadwa admits and she’s longing for a change.  “I used to dream about surviving, but now we’re fine. Now I dream of leaving this place and of having just one day at home in Deir Ezzor, but I heard our house was destroyed and there’s nothing to go back to. I used to have a garden with trees but now I live in a car park.”  The United Kingdom’s support is nourishing Fadwa’s hope of a return and keeping her going until then. Whilst it appears on the surface that not much has changed, there are enough subtle changes to her family’s life to suggest otherwise.  In the Photo: A handful of invoices. Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180627_W....JPG
4777 x 3185 px 168.52 x 112.36 cm 3530.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Aley, 30 May 2018  WFP is running tech for food programmes throughout Lebanon. Youth participants are paid for completing classes in basic English and digital skills. After they graduate from the programme, participants are equipped with skills which can be used in the global digital world when seeking employment.   In the Photo: Dalili (meaning “my guide” in Arabic) is a smartphone application developed by WFP with the assistance of the Munich Accelerator. It helps users (beneficiary or not) to find affordable nearby food using the phone’s GPS function. It was originally designed to assist beneficiaries to maximise the purchasing power, but as it is open to the public, it can be used by all.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180530_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2007.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Aley, 30 May 2018  WFP is running tech for food programmes throughout Lebanon. Youth participants are paid for completing classes in basic English and digital skills. After they graduate from the programme, participants are equipped with skills which can be used in the global digital world when seeking employment.   In the Photo: Assistant Executive Director Valerie Guarnieri visited one of the projects in Aley outside Beirut.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180530_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2638.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley, 22 April 2018  Nestled between make-shift shelters in a crowded settlement in the Bekaa Valley is a sparsely-filled three-room shelter. There are two rooms for sleeping and one kitchen that doubles as a bathroom. Inside are a few donated mattresses stacked up, some pots and pans and one bag nailed to the wall. The bag contains the family’s precious possessions: medicine, a bit of cash and a red debit card — their lifeline and access to food. The World Food Programme (WFP) refers to these red cards as electronic cards — or e-cards — that it uses to transfer funds to vulnerable refugees so they can buy food for their families. This is where Amira lives with her husband and six children. There are few windows but the dark space provides a welcome escape from the scorching sun outside. Silver insulation covers the walls, keeping a moderate temperature all year round. “After five years here, we learned how to adapt,” she explained. Amira is one of around a million Syrians in Lebanon, displaced by the war at home. We sat for an hour talking before I realised she was not the Amira I was looking for.  In the Photo: Amira and her son Mohamad.  Photo: WFP/Ziad Rizkallah
LEB_20180423_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 9045.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley, 23 April 2018  Nestled between make-shift shelters in a crowded settlement in the Bekaa Valley is a sparsely-filled three-room shelter. There are two rooms for sleeping and one kitchen that doubles as a bathroom. Inside are a few donated mattresses stacked up, some pots and pans and one bag nailed to the wall. The bag contains the family’s precious possessions: medicine, a bit of cash and a red debit card — their lifeline and access to food. The World Food Programme (WFP) refers to these red cards as electronic cards — or e-cards — that it uses to transfer funds to vulnerable refugees so they can buy food for their families. This is where Amira lives with her husband and six children. There are few windows but the dark space provides a welcome escape from the scorching sun outside. Silver insulation covers the walls, keeping a moderate temperature all year round. “After five years here, we learned how to adapt,” she explained. Amira is one of around a million Syrians in Lebanon, displaced by the war at home. We sat for an hour talking before I realised she was not the Amira I was looking for.  In the Photo: Outside Amira’s home in the Bekaa Valley.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180423_W....JPG
5438 x 3625 px 46.04 x 30.69 cm 7000.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley, 23 April 2018  Nestled between make-shift shelters in a crowded settlement in the Bekaa Valley is a sparsely-filled three-room shelter. There are two rooms for sleeping and one kitchen that doubles as a bathroom. Inside are a few donated mattresses stacked up, some pots and pans and one bag nailed to the wall. The bag contains the family’s precious possessions: medicine, a bit of cash and a red debit card — their lifeline and access to food. The World Food Programme (WFP) refers to these red cards as electronic cards — or e-cards — that it uses to transfer funds to vulnerable refugees so they can buy food for their families. This is where Amira lives with her husband and six children. There are few windows but the dark space provides a welcome escape from the scorching sun outside. Silver insulation covers the walls, keeping a moderate temperature all year round. “After five years here, we learned how to adapt,” she explained. Amira is one of around a million Syrians in Lebanon, displaced by the war at home. We sat for an hour talking before I realised she was not the Amira I was looking for.  In the Photo: Inside Amira’s home in the Bekaa Valley.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 11863.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley, 23 April 2018  Nestled between make-shift shelters in a crowded settlement in the Bekaa Valley is a sparsely-filled three-room shelter. There are two rooms for sleeping and one kitchen that doubles as a bathroom. Inside are a few donated mattresses stacked up, some pots and pans and one bag nailed to the wall. The bag contains the family’s precious possessions: medicine, a bit of cash and a red debit card — their lifeline and access to food. The World Food Programme (WFP) refers to these red cards as electronic cards — or e-cards — that it uses to transfer funds to vulnerable refugees so they can buy food for their families. This is where Amira lives with her husband and six children. There are few windows but the dark space provides a welcome escape from the scorching sun outside. Silver insulation covers the walls, keeping a moderate temperature all year round. “After five years here, we learned how to adapt,” she explained. Amira is one of around a million Syrians in Lebanon, displaced by the war at home. We sat for an hour talking before I realised she was not the Amira I was looking for.  In the Photo: Inside Amira’s home in the Bekaa Valley. E-cards give refugees more freedom and control over the foods they buy. Amira’s red e-card is kept safe in a bag nailed to the wall  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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Lebanon, Chouf, 05 April 2018  Bassima has a self-declared knowledge of all the trees in Lebanon, “It’s the same as planting at home,” she explained whilst crouching down by her sapling. “I love being in nature and this course gave me the confidence to look for a job in agriculture when I go home to Syria.”   She is one of WFP Lebanon’s livelihoods participants. In exchange for completing a training course in forestry, she receives a stipend from WFP on her electronic card. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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Lebanon, Chouf, 05 April 2018  Bassima has a self-declared knowledge of all the trees in Lebanon, “It’s the same as planting at home,” she explained whilst crouching down by her sapling. “I love being in nature and this course gave me the confidence to look for a job in agriculture when I go home to Syria.”   She is one of WFP Lebanon’s livelihoods participants. In exchange for completing a training course in forestry, she receives a stipend from WFP on her electronic card. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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Lebanon, Beirut, Beirut. 23 March 2018.  In 2016, Ahmad’s family crossed the Syrian mountains and entered Lebanon with a couple of flimsy plastic bags containing a bundle of belongings and not a lot else. Family friends who fled earlier helped locate a one-room apartment for the family of eight. Lebanese neighbours filled boxes with clothes for the children. A new temporary home had been found, but the kitchen was empty. With no income, no money, nothing of worth and no way to eat beyond begging, Ahmad’s family was desperate for food.  The e-card allows families like Ahmad’s to buy the food that they need, when they need it. Each month, every family member with an e-card receives US$27 each for food. That cash can be spent in any of the 500-plus shops vetted by WFP across Lebanon.   Rice is no longer their only food. “We eat pasta, beans, meat, bread, vegetables, enough for at least two meals a day and there are no tears at bedtime now.”  In the Photo: Ahmad’s family.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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Lebanon, Beirut, Beirut. 23 March 2018.  In 2016, Ahmad’s family crossed the Syrian mountains and entered Lebanon with a couple of flimsy plastic bags containing a bundle of belongings and not a lot else. Family friends who fled earlier helped locate a one-room apartment for the family of eight. Lebanese neighbours filled boxes with clothes for the children. A new temporary home had been found, but the kitchen was empty. With no income, no money, nothing of worth and no way to eat beyond begging, Ahmad’s family was desperate for food.  The e-card allows families like Ahmad’s to buy the food that they need, when they need it. Each month, every family member with an e-card receives US$27 each for food. That cash can be spent in any of the 500-plus shops vetted by WFP across Lebanon.   Rice is no longer their only food. “We eat pasta, beans, meat, bread, vegetables, enough for at least two meals a day and there are no tears at bedtime now.”  In the Photo: Ahmad’s family.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Radwan is a Syrian refugee and participant in WFP Lebanon’s food for training programme. For two months he is participating in a carpentry workshop led by UNIDO. He is paid for participating and again upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills he learns in woodwork will be beneficial in finding future livelihood opportunities. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Radwan is a Syrian refugee and participant in WFP Lebanon’s food for training programme. For two months he is participating in a carpentry workshop led by UNIDO. He is paid for participating and again upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills he learns in woodwork will be beneficial in finding future livelihood opportunities. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP livelihoods project are celebrating their graduation. Over two months they learned a variety of carpentry skills under the technical supervision of UNIDO. The participants come from vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities in northern Lebanon and are all paid for participation and upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills they learn can be used to find future employment opportunities in Lebanon or beyond.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Mohamad made his first table after completing a carpentry course in northern Lebanon run by UNIDO and WFP. It is one of over 100 livelihoods projects in Lebanon, all fully funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: WFP is running over 100 food for training and food for assets programmes in Lebanon. Projects are designed so that those participating learn skills which can be used to find future employment opportunities either in Lebanon or beyond.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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