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"(IPTC101 contains(lebanon))": 1645 results 

 
Lebanon, Beirut, Beirut. 23 March 2018.  In 2016, Ahmad’s family crossed the Syrian mountains and entered Lebanon with a couple of flimsy plastic bags containing a bundle of belongings and not a lot else. Family friends who fled earlier helped locate a one-room apartment for the family of eight. Lebanese neighbours filled boxes with clothes for the children. A new temporary home had been found, but the kitchen was empty. With no income, no money, nothing of worth and no way to eat beyond begging, Ahmad’s family was desperate for food.  The e-card allows families like Ahmad’s to buy the food that they need, when they need it. Each month, every family member with an e-card receives US$27 each for food. That cash can be spent in any of the 500-plus shops vetted by WFP across Lebanon.   Rice is no longer their only food. “We eat pasta, beans, meat, bread, vegetables, enough for at least two meals a day and there are no tears at bedtime now.”  In the Photo: Ahmad’s family.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180323_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3420.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, Beirut. 23 March 2018.  In 2016, Ahmad’s family crossed the Syrian mountains and entered Lebanon with a couple of flimsy plastic bags containing a bundle of belongings and not a lot else. Family friends who fled earlier helped locate a one-room apartment for the family of eight. Lebanese neighbours filled boxes with clothes for the children. A new temporary home had been found, but the kitchen was empty. With no income, no money, nothing of worth and no way to eat beyond begging, Ahmad’s family was desperate for food.  The e-card allows families like Ahmad’s to buy the food that they need, when they need it. Each month, every family member with an e-card receives US$27 each for food. That cash can be spent in any of the 500-plus shops vetted by WFP across Lebanon.   Rice is no longer their only food. “We eat pasta, beans, meat, bread, vegetables, enough for at least two meals a day and there are no tears at bedtime now.”  In the Photo: Ahmad’s family.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20180323_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4356.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Radwan is a Syrian refugee and participant in WFP Lebanon’s food for training programme. For two months he is participating in a carpentry workshop led by UNIDO. He is paid for participating and again upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills he learns in woodwork will be beneficial in finding future livelihood opportunities. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
LEB_20180216_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5880.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Radwan is a Syrian refugee and participant in WFP Lebanon’s food for training programme. For two months he is participating in a carpentry workshop led by UNIDO. He is paid for participating and again upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills he learns in woodwork will be beneficial in finding future livelihood opportunities. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
LEB_20180216_W....JPG
5361 x 3574 px 189.12 x 126.08 cm 3346.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP livelihoods project are celebrating their graduation. Over two months they learned a variety of carpentry skills under the technical supervision of UNIDO. The participants come from vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities in northern Lebanon and are all paid for participation and upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills they learn can be used to find future employment opportunities in Lebanon or beyond.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
LEB_20180216_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3801.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Mohamad made his first table after completing a carpentry course in northern Lebanon run by UNIDO and WFP. It is one of over 100 livelihoods projects in Lebanon, all fully funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
LEB_20180216_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3208.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: WFP is running over 100 food for training and food for assets programmes in Lebanon. Projects are designed so that those participating learn skills which can be used to find future employment opportunities either in Lebanon or beyond.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
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5038 x 3359 px 177.73 x 118.50 cm 1816.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Zgharta, North Governorate. 16 February 2018.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the Photo: Radwan is a Syrian refugee and participant in WFP Lebanon’s food for training programme. For two months he is participating in a carpentry workshop led by UNIDO. He is paid for participating and again upon graduation. It is hoped that the skills he learns in woodwork will be beneficial in finding future livelihood opportunities. The project is funded by Germany’s BMZ.  Photo: WFP/Mazen Hodeib
LEB_20180216_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4221.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 01 December 2017  On the Beirut to Damascus stretch which runs through the middle of Beirut’s busiest nightclub district, a Syrian refugee family lives in two rooms on the ground floor of a building next to a blaring generator.   The family began receiving food assistance from the World Food Programme soon after they arrived in Lebanon in 2012. The family is now receiving a WFP monthly allowance using funding from the Humanitarian Aid department of the European Commission (ECHO). With that cash, not only are they buying more food than they could before, but it is also cheaper as they can shop around for the best deals from any shop.   In the Photo: Old Lebanese train system.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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3024 x 4032 px 106.68 x 142.24 cm 3767.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 01 December 2017  On the Beirut to Damascus stretch which runs through the middle of Beirut’s busiest nightclub district, a Syrian refugee family lives in two rooms on the ground floor of a building next to a blaring generator.   The family began receiving food assistance from the World Food Programme soon after they arrived in Lebanon in 2012. The family is now receiving a WFP monthly allowance using funding from the Humanitarian Aid department of the European Commission (ECHO). With that cash, not only are they buying more food than they could before, but it is also cheaper as they can shop around for the best deals from any shop.   In the Photo: 33-year-old Aman lives in the house on the tracks.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2244.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 01 December 2017  On the Beirut to Damascus stretch which runs through the middle of Beirut’s busiest nightclub district, a Syrian refugee family lives in two rooms on the ground floor of a building next to a blaring generator.   The family began receiving food assistance from the World Food Programme soon after they arrived in Lebanon in 2012. The family is now receiving a WFP monthly allowance using funding from the Humanitarian Aid department of the European Commission (ECHO). With that cash, not only are they buying more food than they could before, but it is also cheaper as they can shop around for the best deals from any shop.   In the Photo: Ahmad now has school supplies and a uniform thanks to ECHO.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171201_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1899.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 01 December 2017  On the Beirut to Damascus stretch which runs through the middle of Beirut’s busiest nightclub district, a Syrian refugee family lives in two rooms on the ground floor of a building next to a blaring generator.   The family began receiving food assistance from the World Food Programme soon after they arrived in Lebanon in 2012. The family is now receiving a WFP monthly allowance using funding from the Humanitarian Aid department of the European Commission (ECHO). With that cash, not only are they buying more food than they could before, but it is also cheaper as they can shop around for the best deals from any shop.   In the Photo: Ahmad now has school supplies and a uniform thanks to ECHO  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171201_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2668.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Pickles, jams, sauces and cheeses are just some of the products packaged on show.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1139.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Susanne, a beneficiary of the project. She admitted that the admin side of the six weeks was tough, but is just as important as processing because customers will not return if they are not happy.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5198 x 3466 px 44.01 x 29.35 cm 733.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Pickles, jams, sauces and cheeses are just some of the products packaged on show.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1156.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Kawthar and her fellow classmates learned that a strong supply chain involves numerous components beyond just making food.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2985.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Since she arrived in Lebanon from Syria four years ago, Amra has struggled to get by. Being a refugee, her opportunities to earn a living are limited. Also, taking care of her children has been her priority and meant that she was unable to leave home to find seasonal work in the Bekaa fields. Since graduating from this programme however, she has found a way to stay at home with her daughters and to generate a little income on the side.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 2463.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Bekaa Valley. 27 October 2017.  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.  Courses on food preparation techniques give resourceful women an edge. The World Food Programme and Save the Children provide these six-week courses in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. At a farmers market in the Bar Elias Public Gardens, 24 Lebanese and Syrian refugee women who took the course showed off their first batches of home made goods.  In the photo: Myriam shows off her tomato sauce and labneh.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171027_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3723.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut, 01 December 2017  On the Beirut to Damascus stretch which runs through the middle of Beirut’s busiest nightclub district, a Syrian refugee family lives in two rooms on the ground floor of a building next to a blaring generator.   The family began receiving food assistance from the World Food Programme soon after they arrived in Lebanon in 2012. The family is now receiving a WFP monthly allowance using funding from the Humanitarian Aid department of the European Commission (ECHO). With that cash, not only are they buying more food than they could before, but it is also cheaper as they can shop around for the best deals from any shop.   In the Photo: Seventy-three percent of refugees live in residential buildings.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171201_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2382.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: Karla, one of the students in the programme.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171017_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1123.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: Twelve-year-old Ibrahim is one of the 17,000 students in the programme.   Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171017_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1131.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Beirut. 17 October 2017.  Lebanon has made significant progress in the last decade and is currently ranked as an upper-middle-income country. However, poverty and income inequality remain high – with wide disparities among regions – and the participation of women in political life and in the job market is low.   The Lebanon’s Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) has selected 38 public primary schools to participate in the World Food Programme’s (WFP) school meals programme. There, Lebanese and Syrian students are given a white paper bag containing fresh fruit and a carton of milk produced in Lebanon each day.  In the photo: A boy drinking milk.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171017_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1878.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: Women and men are involved in WFP’s food for assets programmes in Lebanon like this one in Hermel. Participants who are working on canal cleaning and rehabilitation receive a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171005_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1702.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: In Hermel, north Lebanon, WFP is running several canal cleaning and rehabilitation activities under a food for assets programme. Projects like these benefit the entire local community and are designed with the municipality.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
LEB_20171005_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3814.00 kb
 
Lebanon, Hermel, 5 October 2017  The spill over from the ongoing war in Syria has exacerbated economic and social challenges in Lebanon, placing a strain on existing resources and already overstretched public services and infrastructure in host communities.   Through food for assets programmes, both vulnerable Lebanese and Syrian communities are engaged in the building or rehabilitation of infrastructures that can help them reduce the impact of climate change and strengthen livelihoods, making participating individuals, their families and communities more resilient to shocks.  In the photo: A Lebanese beneficiary on a canal cleaning and rehabilitation food for assets programme in Hermel, north Lebanon. He receives a one off $105 payment per cycle plus $5 per day for transport costs.  Photo: WFP/Edward Johnson
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 2937.00 kb

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