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"(IPTC101 contains(lesotho))": 332 results 

 
Lesotho, Boleka village, Mafeteng district, 14 March 2016  Hundreds of thousands of people are facing hunger as an El Niño-related drought takes its toll in Lesotho. To reduce its impact, WFP is giving money to the most vulnerable families in two of the worst-affected districts.  Two-year-old Teboho closes his eyes as flies buzz around his face. Too weak to continue, he gives up. He and his young siblings had their last meal of porridge earlier in the morning. Seven hours later and the children have had nothing to eat since that morning. They keep a sharp look on the road down which their grandmother, Matsoanelo Makhomo, set off many hours earlier on a visit to the bank in Mafeteng town. Before she left, she told them she would be coming home with food and sweets.  Makhomo (68), a widow from Boleka village is one of some 2,000 people in Mafeteng district to whom the World Food Programme has given 1,020 Maloti, the equivalent of US $65, to buy food for their families as part of a relief programme to assist those worst-affected by El Niño-related drought. When she arrives home, Makhomo and her daughter hold plastic bags of food, including 12,5 kgs of maize meal, one kg of beans, a bottle of vegetable oil, 2 kgs sugar, two loaves of bread and some vegetables.  “WFP has been a great help to us during this drought,” says Makhomo, “We've nothing in our fields and no money to buy food."  WFP started distributing cash to the families hit by the drought in Mafeteng district in mid-March, having launched a similar operation for 2,000 desperate people in Mohale’s Hoek district at the end of February. Funds are disbursed to beneficiaries through WFP’s operating partner, the Standard Lesotho Bank. It is estimated that, in total, some 21,000 family members will be able to buy food with the cash they receive.  For the Makhomo family, and many others, this is a lifeline that has reached them just in time. Mathabang Mpitso from Kolo village says all the maize she planted twice failed to germinate due to the excessive dry conditions experienced between October and December last year. A single mother, she also received money from WFP, which she used to buy food for her family of five.  “After we finished all the food from our last harvest, we were depending on a relative working in the city. It has been a huge burden on her because she also supports her own family,” says Mpitso. Mpitso’s family is one of the many farming families throughout the country whose crops failed to germinate at the height of the planting season last year.  The Government of Lesotho declared a drought emergency and issued appeal for international assistance in December 2015. Some 530,000 people in rural Lesotho are currently estimated to need food assistance until June. Forecasts indicate that the forthcoming mid-year harvest will bring little bounty.   This assistance was made possible with funding from European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) and the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).  Photo: WFP/Tsitsi Matope
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3664 x 2748 px 129.26 x 96.94 cm 2382.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Boleka village, Mafeteng district, 14 March 2016  Hundreds of thousands of people are facing hunger as an El Niño-related drought takes its toll in Lesotho. To reduce its impact, WFP is giving money to the most vulnerable families in two of the worst-affected districts.  Two-year-old Teboho closes his eyes as flies buzz around his face. Too weak to continue, he gives up. He and his young siblings had their last meal of porridge earlier in the morning. Seven hours later and the children have had nothing to eat since that morning. They keep a sharp look on the road down which their grandmother, Matsoanelo Makhomo, set off many hours earlier on a visit to the bank in Mafeteng town. Before she left, she told them she would be coming home with food and sweets.  Makhomo (68), a widow from Boleka village is one of some 2,000 people in Mafeteng district to whom the World Food Programme has given 1,020 Maloti, the equivalent of US $65, to buy food for their families as part of a relief programme to assist those worst-affected by El Niño-related drought. When she arrives home, Makhomo and her daughter hold plastic bags of food, including 12,5 kgs of maize meal, one kg of beans, a bottle of vegetable oil, 2 kgs sugar, two loaves of bread and some vegetables.  “WFP has been a great help to us during this drought,” says Makhomo, “We've nothing in our fields and no money to buy food."  WFP started distributing cash to the families hit by the drought in Mafeteng district in mid-March, having launched a similar operation for 2,000 desperate people in Mohale’s Hoek district at the end of February. Funds are disbursed to beneficiaries through WFP’s operating partner, the Standard Lesotho Bank. It is estimated that, in total, some 21,000 family members will be able to buy food with the cash they receive.  For the Makhomo family, and many others, this is a lifeline that has reached them just in time. Mathabang Mpitso from Kolo village says all the maize she planted twice failed to germinate due to the excessive dry conditions experienced between October and December last year. A single mother, she also received money from WFP, which she used to buy food for her family of five.  “After we finished all the food from our last harvest, we were depending on a relative working in the city. It has been a huge burden on her because she also supports her own family,” says Mpitso. Mpitso’s family is one of the many farming families throughout the country whose crops failed to germinate at the height of the planting season last year.  The Government of Lesotho declared a drought emergency and issued appeal for international assistance in December 2015. Some 530,000 people in rural Lesotho are currently estimated to need food assistance until June. Forecasts indicate that the forthcoming mid-year harvest will bring little bounty.   This assistance was made possible with funding from European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) and the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).  Photo: WFP/Tsitsi Matope
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3664 x 2748 px 129.26 x 96.94 cm 2486.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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3744 x 5616 px 39.62 x 59.44 cm 13468.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12712.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 13745.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 14311.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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3744 x 5616 px 39.62 x 59.44 cm 13563.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12206.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12164.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12283.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 10718.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12113.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 13071.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 13004.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 12267.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 13119.00 kb
 
Lesotho, Mohale Dam, Montsi Primary School. 19 June 2013  Lesotho is a mountainous lower middle-income country that occupies an area of 30,000 km2 and is ranked 158 out of 186 countries according to the 2012 UNDP Human Development Index. One quarter of the country's 1.8 million people (source Census 2006) live in mountainous districts and about 67 percent are considered poor.   WFP supports schools which are located in the high mountainous regions of Lesotho, areas which are very challenging to reach and where simple things like oranges and other fruit are in short supply. Yudhika Sujanani has recently become a WFP Hunger Advocate and in June 2013 traveled to Lesotho for the first time to see first-hand how WFP is working with vulnerable communities to overcome hunger and malnutrition.   In the photo: Yudhika Sujanani, WFP Hunger Advocate, visits the primary school for lunch time. In Lesotho 39% of children are stunted. The main cause of stunting is malnutrition during the 1,000 days, from time of conception to two years of age.   Photo: WFP/Leonie Marinovich
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5616 x 3744 px 59.44 x 39.62 cm 10177.00 kb
 
Lesotho, 9 December 2008  Getting lunch ready for children at the Phelisanong orphanage.   Copyright: WFP/Tang Shizeng
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4455 x 2970 px 37.72 x 25.15 cm 4641.00 kb
 
Lesotho, 9 December 2008  Getting lunch ready for children at the Phelisanong orphanage.   Copyright: WFP/Tang Shizeng
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4455 x 2970 px 37.72 x 25.15 cm 6073.00 kb
 
Lesotho September 2007  Tebellong, Mohale's Hoek district - typical conservation farming field.  For the first time ever, WFP bought food directly from small-scale farmers in Lesotho. WFP purchased 8 mt of maize from 20 farmers in the remote and drought-hit district of Mohale's Hoek. By buying directly, WFP is helping to stimulate the local agricultural economy and boost production by providing a market for the surplus. The purchase is also beneficial for WFP since it cost US$45 per ton less to buy in Tebellong and distribute in nearby schools than buying in SA (US$350 v US$395). The purchase was funded by German government.  The farmers were able to produce a surplus despite the country's worst drought in 30 years because they followed conservation farming techniques. These techniques include leaving crop residue on the fields to improve soil fertility and reduce erosion, digging seed basins rather than traditional ploughing and preparing land during course of the year rather than just before rains.  Farmers were trained in conservation farming techniques under a WFP food-for-training activity that was conducted by the Lesotho Evangelical Church.  Photo: WFP/Richard Lee
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2160 x 1440 px 18.29 x 12.19 cm 2689.00 kb
 
Lesotho November 2007  Women who cook the lunch at White Hill Primary school in southeastern Lesotho. The women are normally mothers of children at the school. The food is provided by WFP through a school feeding programme.  Photo taken by Makhahlo Mosothoane, who is 26 and teaches Class 3 at the White Hill Primary school. She lives  in White Hill. There are 10 people in her house, including her mother and father and her two brothers and their families and her 1 year-old daughter.  White Hill is a very poor area. There is no electricity and most people live day-to-day. Many families do not have enough to eat and children often come to school too hungry to study.  WFP food really helps children to learn. It gives them energy and you can see the difference when they have eaten. She also think that it encourages many more to come to school because they know that they will get two meals during the day.   Photo: WFP/Makhahlo Mosothoane
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1908 x 1272 px 67.31 x 44.87 cm 2546.00 kb
 
Lesotho November 2007  Pupils lining up for lunch at White Hill Primary school in southeastern Lesotho. The food is provided by WFP through a school feeding programme.  Photo taken by Makhahlo Mosothoane, who is 26 and teaches Class 3 at the White Hill Primary school. She lives  in White Hill. There are 10 people in her house, including her mother and father and her two brothers and their families and her 1 year-old daughter.  White Hill is a very poor area. There is no electricity and most people live day-to-day. Many families do not have enough to eat and children often come to school too hungry to study.  WFP food really helps children to learn. It gives them energy and you can see the difference when they have eaten. She also think that it encourages many more to come to school because they know that they will get two meals during the day.  Photo: WFP/Makhahlo Mosothoane
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1272 x 1908 px 44.87 x 67.31 cm 2566.00 kb
 
Pupils playing at White Hill Primary school in southeastern Lesotho.   Photo taken by Makhahlo Mosothoane, who is 26 and teaches Class 3 at the White Hill Primary school. She lives  in White Hill. There are 10 people in her house, including her mother and father and her two brothers and their families and her 1 year-old daughter.  White Hill is a very poor area. There is no electricity and most people live day-to-day. Many families do not have enough to eat and children often come to school too hungry to study.  WFP food really helps children to learn. It gives them energy and you can see the difference when they have eaten. She also think that it encourages many more to come to school because they know that they will get two meals during the day.   Photo: WFP/Makhahlo Mosothoane
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1908 x 1272 px 67.31 x 44.87 cm 2351.00 kb
 
Lesotho November 2007  Pupils walking home from White Hill Primary school in southeastern Lesotho.  Photo taken by Makhahlo Mosothoane, who is 26 and teaches Class 3 at the White Hill Primary school. She lives  in White Hill. There are 10 people in her house, including her mother and father and her two brothers and their families and her 1 year-old daughter.  White Hill is a very poor area. There is no electricity and most people live day-to-day. Many families do not have enough to eat and children often come to school too hungry to study.  WFP food really helps children to learn. It gives them energy and you can see the difference when they have eaten. She also think that it encourages many more to come to school because they know that they will get two meals during the day.   Photo: WFP/Makhahlo Mosothoane
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1908 x 1272 px 67.31 x 44.87 cm 2220.00 kb
 
Lesotho November 2007  Pupils enjoying break at White Hill Primary school in southeastern Lesotho.  Photo taken by Makhahlo Mosothoane, who is 26 and teaches Class 3 at the White Hill Primary school. She lives  in White Hill. There are 10 people in her house, including her mother and father and her two brothers and their families and her 1 year-old daughter.  White Hill is a very poor area. There is no electricity and most people live day-to-day. Many families do not have enough to eat and children often come to school too hungry to study.  WFP food really helps children to learn. It gives them energy and you can see the difference when they have eaten. She also think that it encourages many more to come to school because they know that they will get two meals during the day.   Photo: WFP/Makhahlo Mosothoane
LES_200711_WFP....jpg
1908 x 1272 px 67.31 x 44.87 cm 2589.00 kb

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