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"(IPTC101 contains(liberia))": 1399 results 

 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  The Home-Grown School Feeding Programme that was set to gradually replace the traditional school meals programme across the country and boost food production, provide nutritious feeding for students, and inject income into local economy has stalled.  At Mehnpa Public School, located on the outskirts of Saclepea Town, the students still remember that not a single student would leave the campus once they smoke rising from the kitchen. Many long for the local delicacies prepared from yams, cassava, potatoes, palm oil, and smoked fish that regularly had.  “I have always been thinking in my mind about when we will see food again,” says Grace Saye, a grade 3 student at Mehnpa. When we have food, we stay here until 3 p.m but when there is no food, it can be hard for us.”  In the Photo: students in class at Mehnpa Public School near Saclepea Town in Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4013.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: Mr Masline Kwazy, Chairperson, Civilized Community, Saclepea, Nimba County, Liberia.  Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4019.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: students in class at Ylamba Public School in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4122.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: students in class at Ylamba Public School in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 3980.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: students in class at Ylamba Public School in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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3264 x 4928 px 27.64 x 41.72 cm 4116.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: students in class at Ylamba Public School in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4026.00 kb
 
Liberia, Saclepea, Nimba County, 8 March 2018  It is 11 a.m. and the bell for recess rings at Ylamba Public School near the Saclepea Town centre in Nimba County, Liberia. Students with books in hand stream out of class but they are not staying in the school compound. Many are heading home to look for what to eat. Most of them, particularly the girls, will not return because they are expected to contribute to put food on the family table.  Students here usually received a meal at school each day as part of the pilot of a home-grown school meal programme initiated by the government of Liberia and its partners including the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in which food for the meals was sourced from smallholder farmers within the community. Then funding dried out and the meals have also stopped coming out of the kitchens.  “Since feeding stopped, we have huge problems in our hands,” says Lucy K. Miapah, the principal of the school. “When there are no meals, many go home early.”  School meals are a powerful tool to encourage children to attend school regularly. They promote access to basic education and human capital development, increase enrolment, attendance, retention and improve attention span and academic performance.  Sitting in her small office with walls emblazoned in academic posters, Miapah says the home-grown school meals brought the girls streaming to school and contributed to 7 out of every 9 girls in the school being promoted in the 2016/2017 academic year.  “In a country where we know girl child enrolment is a priority, the feeding programme was helping us get them and keep them here,” says Miapah.  Limited financing for school meals in Liberia means the programmes are almost grinding to a complete halt. WFP, which is the government’s main partner and the lead provider of social and productive safety net interventions through the school meals is struggling. The agency needs US$ 4.2 million to avoid shutting down its project that aims to reach 127,000 children in the most food insecure parts of Liberia.  In the Photo: students in class at Ylamba Public School in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/John Monibah
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4777.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  An outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease in March 2014 claimed 4,800 lives in just over a year and highlighted Liberia's fragility. Although Liberia was declared Ebola-free in January 2016, the crisis had a severe impact on the country’s economy.  Economic growth for 2014 fell from a projected 5.9 percent to between 0.7 and 0.9 percent and the cumulative loss of output was equivalent to 7.7 percent of the gross domestic product.  In the photo: A former Ebola storage facility in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4558.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A view of rural Liberia.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4386.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A farmer who harvests and processes rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4551.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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4870 x 3635 px 171.80 x 128.23 cm 3883.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5288.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5320.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5012.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5454.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5908.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5263.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5510.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students waiting outside their classroom at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea, which is supported by WFP's home-grown school meals.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3254.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students eating their home-grown school meals at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3882.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A student eating her home-grown school meal at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2684.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students eating their home-grown school meals at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3772.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students receiving their home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4488.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A student receiving her home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4762.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students receiving their home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4786.00 kb

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