Loading
  • Archives
  • Views
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

"(IPTC101 contains(liberia))": 1392 results 

 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  An outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease in March 2014 claimed 4,800 lives in just over a year and highlighted Liberia's fragility. Although Liberia was declared Ebola-free in January 2016, the crisis had a severe impact on the country’s economy.  Economic growth for 2014 fell from a projected 5.9 percent to between 0.7 and 0.9 percent and the cumulative loss of output was equivalent to 7.7 percent of the gross domestic product.  In the photo: A former Ebola storage facility in Nimba County, Liberia.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4558.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A view of rural Liberia.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4386.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A farmer who harvests and processes rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4551.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
4870 x 3635 px 171.80 x 128.23 cm 3883.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5288.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5320.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5012.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5454.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5908.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5263.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, 03 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Rice farmers harvesting and processing rice. Some 26 farming organizations supply food for the school meals programme in Liberia. WFP buys about 500 metric tons of rice per quarter from them, with support from Japanese donations. Farmers also benefit from training to improve their rice production, receive improved rice seeds and food incentives. They now produce twice as much rice as before.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161103_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5510.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students waiting outside their classroom at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea, which is supported by WFP's home-grown school meals.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3254.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students eating their home-grown school meals at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3882.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A student eating her home-grown school meal at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2684.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students eating their home-grown school meals at lunch time at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3772.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students receiving their home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4488.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: A student receiving her home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4762.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Students receiving their home-grown school meal at United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea.  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4786.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Three cooks at the United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea make meals for about 120 children every day.   One of the cooks, Lucy, has three children of her own in school, “I often sit quietly and look at the children eat and enjoy their meals. It brings me joy to see them. This is a blessing to me and many other parents’ it saves me lunch money and when my children come home, they go playing or do their homework. They have a lot of energy and don’t seem to care to eat as much as before at home.”  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4363.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  Liberia is home to the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world, with nearly two-thirds of primary-aged children not accessing school. Farmers in Liberia were hit hard by the Ebola epidemic, as it prevented them from cultivating their fields, harvesting or selling their crops.  To foster the recovery of both the agricultural and educational sectors, in June 2016 WFP started a pilot home-grown school meals project in Nimba county where the malnutrition rate is at 43 percent. Each month, WFP buys about 14 metric tons of cassava, beans, peppers, eddoes, sweet potatoes, plantains, fish and palm oil from local farmers to be used in school meals for some 3,000 in 12 schools in the county.   Promoting the use of vegetables encourages a more varied and nutritious diet for Liberian children whose main staple food is usually rice. In addition to these nutritional benefits for students, the programme increases income generation opportunities for farmers, and sustainable development for local communities.  In the photo: Three cooks at the United Liberia Inland Church School in Saclepea make meals for about 120 children every day.   One of the cooks, Lucy, has three children of her own in school, “I often sit quietly and look at the children eat and enjoy their meals. It brings me joy to see them. This is a blessing to me and many other parents’ it saves me lunch money and when my children come home, they go playing or do their homework. They have a lot of energy and don’t seem to care to eat as much as before at home.”  Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4234.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  To help secondary school girls stay in school, WFP provides girls and their families with take-home food rations – 12 kilograms of rice and 1 litre of oil per month. Rations are conditional upon at least 80 percent attendance each month – aiming to increase enrolments and retention rates. About 1,000 girls receive take-home rations in Nimba county which are funded by USAID.  In the photo: In this school in Saclepea, 21 girls – between 13 and 18 years old – take rice and oil back to their families. The principal explains that, since the take-home rations were introduced, the number of girls in the school almost doubled, showing big steps towards closing the gap in Liberia’s secondary school education system.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3602.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  To help secondary school girls stay in school, WFP provides girls and their families with take-home food rations – 12 kilograms of rice and 1 litre of oil per month. Rations are conditional upon at least 80 percent attendance each month – aiming to increase enrolments and retention rates. About 1,000 girls receive take-home rations in Nimba county which are funded by USAID.  In the photo: In this school in Saclepea, 21 girls – between 13 and 18 years old – take rice and oil back to their families. The principal explains that, since the take-home rations were introduced, the number of girls in the school almost doubled, showing big steps towards closing the gap in Liberia’s secondary school education system.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3756.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  To help secondary school girls stay in school, WFP provides girls and their families with take-home food rations – 12 kilograms of rice and 1 litre of oil per month. Rations are conditional upon at least 80 percent attendance each month – aiming to increase enrolments and retention rates. About 1,000 girls receive take-home rations in Nimba county which are funded by USAID.  In the photo: In this school in Saclepea, 21 girls – between 13 and 18 years old – take rice and oil back to their families. The principal explains that, since the take-home rations were introduced, the number of girls in the school almost doubled, showing big steps towards closing the gap in Liberia’s secondary school education system.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4190.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  To help secondary school girls stay in school, WFP provides girls and their families with take-home food rations – 12 kilograms of rice and 1 litre of oil per month. Rations are conditional upon at least 80 percent attendance each month – aiming to increase enrolments and retention rates. About 1,000 girls receive take-home rations in Nimba county which are funded by USAID.  In the photo: In this school in Saclepea, 21 girls – between 13 and 18 years old – take rice and oil back to their families. The principal explains that, since the take-home rations were introduced, the number of girls in the school almost doubled, showing big steps towards closing the gap in Liberia’s secondary school education system.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3852.00 kb
 
Liberia, Nimba County, Saclepea, 02 November 2016  To help secondary school girls stay in school, WFP provides girls and their families with take-home food rations – 12 kilograms of rice and 1 litre of oil per month. Rations are conditional upon at least 80 percent attendance each month – aiming to increase enrolments and retention rates. About 1,000 girls receive take-home rations in Nimba county which are funded by USAID.  In the photo: In this school in Saclepea, 21 girls – between 13 and 18 years old – take rice and oil back to their families. The principal explains that, since the take-home rations were introduced, the number of girls in the school almost doubled, showing big steps towards closing the gap in Liberia’s secondary school education system.   Photo: WFP/Adel Sarkozi
LIR_20161102_W....JPG
5204 x 3640 px 183.59 x 128.41 cm 2877.00 kb

Copyright © World Food Programme 2005-2017. All rights reserved.