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"(IPTC101 contains(madagascar))": 992 results 

 
Madagascar, Tanandava district, 11 November 2016  Tanandava: Maize production site  During an IFAD’s information session, this smallholder farmers association shows its production of maize and niebe beans. FAO first provided the seeds in 2011 and WFP buys the surpluses for its school meals programme and emergency response activities, in the framework of its support to smallholder farmers programme (P4P-like programme).   In the Photo: maize planted with FAO seeds  Photo: WFP/Riana Ravoala
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3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4126.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Tanandava district, 11 November 2016  Tanandava: Maize production site  During an IFAD’s information session, this smallholder farmers association shows its production of maize and niebe beans. FAO first provided the seeds in 2011 and WFP buys the surpluses for its school meals programme and emergency response activities, in the framework of its support to smallholder farmers programme (P4P-like programme).   In the Photo: Smallholder farmers with the maize and niebe production.  Photo: WFP/Riana Ravoala
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3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4514.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Andahive, 11 November 2016  Andahive: Cassava and sweet potato crops   Thanks to the seeds distributed by FAO, Kazy will be able to harvest sweet potatoes. The food provided by WFP enables her to feed her family and prevent them from eating up the seeds.  Sweet potato cuttings were distributed by FAO in June 2016 and planted in July 2016. These are enhanced and drought-resistant cuttings which are locally purchased. This activity was funded by the CERF as part of the drought response. Kazy’s neighbours could also grow cassava (in the background) thanks to FAO and WFP support.  In the Photo: Kazy with sweet potato  Photo: WFP/Riana Ravoala
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2592 x 3888 px 91.44 x 137.16 cm 4144.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Andahive, 11 November 2016  Andahive: Cassava and sweet potato crops   Thanks to the seeds distributed by FAO, Kazy will be able to harvest sweet potatoes. The food provided by WFP enables her to feed her family and prevent them from eating up the seeds.  Sweet potato cuttings were distributed by FAO in June 2016 and planted in July 2016. These are enhanced and drought-resistant cuttings which are locally purchased. This activity was funded by the CERF as part of the drought response.  In the Photo: WFP & FAO beneficiaries in cassava fields      Photo: WFP/Riana Ravoala
MAG_20161111_W....JPG
2592 x 3888 px 91.44 x 137.16 cm 4314.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ambovombe district, 10 November 2016  In this public primary school of the Ambovombe district, WFP and FAO work hand in hand to provide a daily school meal to vulnerable children and set-up a school garden in order to diversify their diet. School children learn how to grow vegetables (such as chives) and receive nutrition education. They re-use WFP bags to plant tomatoes.  Photo: WFP/Riana Ravoala
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3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4741.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ankilimafaitse, Ambovombe district, 4 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin talking to Nicole student at the Ankilimafaitse Primary school (Ambovombe district) where WFP implements the school feeding programme on behalf of Madagascar’s Ministry of Education. Some of the 230,000 primary school children – just over 40 percent of all children in the south - who receive a daily school meal from WFP. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day. Working alongside the Government, UNICEF and the World Bank, WFP is also planning on expanding its school meals programme as from 2017 to reach even more children in the drought-affected south.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
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3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4038.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ankilimafaitse, Ambovombe district, 4 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin talking to Nicole student at the Ankilimafaitse Primary school (Ambovombe district) where WFP implements the school feeding programme on behalf of Madagascar’s Ministry of Education. Some of the 230,000 primary school children – just over 40 percent of all children in the south - who receive a daily school meal from WFP. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day. Working alongside the Government, UNICEF and the World Bank, WFP is also planning on expanding its school meals programme as from 2017 to reach even more children in the drought-affected south.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161004_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4073.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ankilimafaitse, Ambovombe district, 4 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin talking to Nicole student at the Ankilimafaitse Primary school (Ambovombe district) where WFP implements the school feeding programme on behalf of Madagascar’s Ministry of Education. Some of the 230,000 primary school children – just over 40 percent of all children in the south - who receive a daily school meal from WFP. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day. Working alongside the Government, UNICEF and the World Bank, WFP is also planning on expanding its school meals programme as from 2017 to reach even more children in the drought-affected south.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161004_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4124.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ankilimafaitse, Ambovombe district, 4 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin visit to the Ankilimafaitse Primary school (Ambovombe district) where WFP implements the school feeding programme on behalf of Madagascar’s Ministry of Education. Some of the 230,000 primary school children – just over 40 percent of all children in the south - who receive a daily school meal from WFP. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day. Working alongside the Government, UNICEF and the World Bank, WFP is also planning on expanding its school meals programme as from 2017 to reach even more children in the drought-affected south.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161004_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4455.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Ankilimafaitse, Ambovombe district, 4 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin visit to the Ankilimafaitse Primary school (Ambovombe district) where WFP implements the school feeding programme on behalf of Madagascar’s Ministry of Education. Some of the 230,000 primary school children – just over 40 percent of all children in the south - who receive a daily school meal from WFP. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day. Working alongside the Government, UNICEF and the World Bank, WFP is also planning on expanding its school meals programme as from 2017 to reach even more children in the drought-affected south.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161004_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4546.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin with Georgette, a young recipient of WFP assistance, Anjampaly, Madagascar.  Georgette, a malnourished girl of 8/9 months is only receiving cactus fruit to eat because there is nothing else for her to eat due to the drought and failed harvests in the area.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161003_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 3371.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin with Georgette, a young recipient of WFP assistance, Anjampaly, Madagascar.  Georgette, a malnourished girl of 8/9 months is only receiving cactus fruit to eat because there is nothing else for her to eat due to the drought and failed harvests in the area.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161003_W....JPG
2592 x 3888 px 91.44 x 137.16 cm 3978.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin visit to Anjampaly, Madagascar. Distribution of nutritional rations for moderate acute malnutrition treatment among children <5 ; and protection rations for their families in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
MAG_20161003_W....JPG
3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 4327.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin visit to Anjampaly, Madagascar. Distribution of nutritional rations for moderate acute malnutrition treatment among children <5 ; and protection rations for their families in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
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3888 x 2592 px 137.16 x 91.44 cm 3908.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: distribution of nutritional rations for moderate acute malnutrition treatment among children <5 ; and protection rations for their families in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: distribution of nutritional rations for moderate acute malnutrition treatment among children <5 ; and protection rations for their families in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin with Georgette, a young recipient of WFP assistance, Anjampaly, Madagascar.  Georgette, a malnourished girl of 8/9 months is only receiving cactus fruit to eat because there is nothing else for her to eat due to the drought and failed harvests in the area.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: distribution of nutritional rations for moderate acute malnutrition treatment among children <5 ; and protection rations for their families in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin looking at a variety of local foods in Anjampaly, including a pot of cactus fruit mixed with honey.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among more than 200,000 pregnant women, nursing mothers and children under five. Here in Anjampaly, women line up for food and nutrition rations. Many of the women wear an orange paste on their faces – this natural beauty mask made from the pounded bark of a tree is reputed to improve the skin.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among more than 200,000 pregnant women, nursing mothers and children under five. Here in Anjampaly, women line up for food and nutrition rations. Many of the women wear an orange paste on their faces – this natural beauty mask made from the pounded bark of a tree is reputed to improve the skin.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: By November 2016, WFP aims to be reaching a million vulnerable people with food and cash. This cash distribution is taking place in Tsihombe, the most food insecure of all districts in Madagascar. A staggering 96 percent of the population here is food insecure, with 80 percent of them severely food insecure.  Photo: WFP/Volana Rarivoson
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  The south of Madagascar is facing one of its worst crises of recent times as a result of three consecutive years of drought and failed harvests. There are an estimated 1.2 million people – that’s two out of three people in the area – suffering from food insecurity. Of these, 600,000 people are severely food insecure with little or no guaranteed access to regular supplies of food. Malnutrition levels among young children are rising. For many, the fruit of the red cactus – which grows by the roadside – is the only readily available food.  Many families have resorted to desperate measures. One household in three in the south of the island has resorted to begging, selling their land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  In response to this situation, the World Food Programme is scaling up it humanitarian operations though its ability to meet the growing needs will depend on it being able to secure the necessary funding. By November 2016, WFP aims to be reaching a million vulnerable people with food and cash. This cash distribution is taking place in Tsihombe, the most food insecure of all districts in Madagascar. A staggering 96 percent of the population here is food insecure, with 80 percent of them severely food insecure.  In the Photo: the local market in Anjampaly.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: By November 2016, WFP aims to be reaching a million vulnerable people with food and cash. This cash distribution is taking place in Tsihombe, the most food insecure of all districts in Madagascar. A staggering 96 percent of the population here is food insecure, with 80 percent of them severely food insecure.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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Madagascar, Anjampaly, 3 October 2016  As a third consecutive year of drought deepens the suffering of hundreds of thousands of people in the south of Madagascar, the World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling up its humanitarian operations in response to rising levels of hunger and malnutrition.  The preliminary results of a multi-agency food security assessment, due to be released shortly, indicate that four out of nine southern districts are likely to fall into the “emergency” classification by year’s end. Unless swift action is taken, three more districts could follow.    “The situation is extremely worrying,” WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said as she concluded a visit to the island nation. “The hunger and malnutrition we’re seeing is the result of three years of ruined harvests. We must receive the necessary funding to respond before it’s too late. This funding will also allow us to invest in people’s livelihoods, so we don’t just save lives but change lives and break the cycle of emergency response.”   The south of Madagascar has been hard hit by this year’s El Niño, which resulted in reduced rains for southern Africa. To escape this misery, one household in three, in the south of the island, has already been forced into desperate measures such as begging, selling its land or house, or migrating. Four in 10 households have already eaten their vital seed stocks, leaving nothing for the November/December planting season.  “I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside,” said Cousin after her visit to Tsihombe district, where nearly all households are food insecure, 80 percent of them severely so. “It’s vital in these situations that we and our partners ensure that no child goes hungry and that every child gets the nutrition he or she needs.”  With adequate funding and in support of the Madagascar government’s own humanitarian response, WFP will scale up from November to reach as many as one million people with food and cash assistance. WFP is also expanding its programme to prevent and treat acute malnutrition among over 200,000 pregnant and nursing women, and children under five.  Starting this month, in support of the upcoming planting season, WFP will provide food to vulnerable communities, complementing the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which will supply tools and drought-resistant seeds.  WFP currently provides a daily hot meal to some 230,000 primary school children - 42 percent of primary school students in the south. For most of these children, the school meal is the only nutritious meal they receive in a day.  To ensure children receive nutrition and the education they deserve, WFP aligns its programme with education actors.  Starting in early 2017, WFP – alongside the Government of Madagascar, UNICEF, the World Bank and other partners – is planning to reach even more children with its school meals programme.  In the Photo: By November 2016, WFP aims to be reaching a million vulnerable people with food and cash. This cash distribution is taking place in Tsihombe, the most food insecure of all districts in Madagascar. A staggering 96 percent of the population here is food insecure, with 80 percent of them severely food insecure. WFP’s Executive Director Ertharin Cousin talks to Heregnalee (38) who tells her she would be unable to survive without the cash transfer she receives from WFP.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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