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"(IPTC101 contains(madagascar))": 1546 results 

 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a herd of Zebu grazing in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  Zebu are characterised by a fatty hump on their shoulders, a large dewlap, and sometimes drooping ears. They are well adapted to withstanding high temperatures, and are farmed throughout the tropical countries. Zebu are used as draught and riding animals, dairy cattle, and beef cattle, as well as for byproducts such as hides and dung for fuel and manure.  It is a symbol of wisdom, with its big horns and humped back, and an integral part of the landscape of Madagascar. The zebu - (bos taurus inidicus), or in Mlagasy language "omby" - is also used as an ecological means of transport.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 11016.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a herd of Zebu grazing in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  Zebu are characterised by a fatty hump on their shoulders, a large dewlap, and sometimes drooping ears. They are well adapted to withstanding high temperatures, and are farmed throughout the tropical countries. Zebu are used as draught and riding animals, dairy cattle, and beef cattle, as well as for byproducts such as hides and dung for fuel and manure.  It is a symbol of wisdom, with its big horns and humped back, and an integral part of the landscape of Madagascar. The zebu - (bos taurus inidicus), or in Mlagasy language "omby" - is also used as an ecological means of transport.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 11389.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a herd of Zebu grazing in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  Zebu are characterised by a fatty hump on their shoulders, a large dewlap, and sometimes drooping ears. They are well adapted to withstanding high temperatures, and are farmed throughout the tropical countries. Zebu are used as draught and riding animals, dairy cattle, and beef cattle, as well as for byproducts such as hides and dung for fuel and manure.  It is a symbol of wisdom, with its big horns and humped back, and an integral part of the landscape of Madagascar. The zebu - (bos taurus inidicus), or in Mlagasy language "omby" - is also used as an ecological means of transport.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3328 px 42.27 x 28.18 cm 11768.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 11653.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 9987.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 16207.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 13005.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 16887.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Soanierana Commune, Taolagnaro, District, Anosy Region, 14 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the Photo: a dry field in Anosy Region, Madagascar.  "In southern Madagascar, the absence of rainfall and prolonged drought have an impact on the crop. This leaves people in a situation of food insecurity. In response to this situation, WFP is bringing food and money through cash transfers to alleviate the suffering of these populations." says Desire Shaleur Watat, WFP Head of WFP Tsihombe Antenna.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 17105.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur Catta) with her baby in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3328 px 42.27 x 28.18 cm 8802.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur Catta) with her baby in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 8291.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: cactus plants in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
4992 x 3418 px 42.27 x 28.94 cm 14964.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: a lemur catta (ring-tailed lemur) in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 9284.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: a lemur catta (ring-tailed lemur) in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 8893.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Réserve de Berenty, Amboasary (Anosy Region), 14 December 2018  The Madagascar spiny forests is an ecoregion in the southwest of Madagascar. The vegetation type is found on poor substrates with low, erratic winter rainfall. Around 95% of the original flora in the spiny forests is endemic, which makes it the most unique ecoregion in Madagascar. Many constituent plants show extreme adaptations to drought.  In the Photo: a lemur catta (ring-tailed lemur) in Berenty, Madagascar spiny forests Madagascar. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181214_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 12158.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola, President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, participating in the project.  In this Photo, the 10th step of the transformation: Vola is holding a container of cassava cakes, an example of delicious food WFP is providing to HGSF school children in Beabo.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 7193.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola, President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, participating in the project.  In this Photo, the 10th step of the transformation: Vola is holding a container of cassava cakes, an example of delicious food WFP is providing to HGSF school children in Beabo.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 9046.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola, President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, participating in the project.  In this Photo, the 10th step of the transformation: Vola is holding a container of cassava cakes, an example of delicious food WFP is providing to HGSF school children in Beabo.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8039.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola (left), President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, and Celine (right) participating in the project.  In this Photo, the 10th step of the transformation: Vola is holding a container of cassava cakes, an example of delicious food WFP is providing to HGSF school children in Beabo.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8348.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018 
In the Photo: Caitlin Fowler, WFP Partnerships Officer, showing a video recorded with a smartphone to a group of happy little children, in Amboasary (southern Madagascar). 
Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8526.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018 
In the Photo: Caitlin Fowler, WFP Partnerships Officer, showing a video recorded with a smartphone to a group of happy little children, in Amboasary (southern Madagascar). 
Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8878.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018 
In the Photo: Caitlin Fowler, WFP Partnerships Officer, showing a video recorded with a smartphone to a group of happy little children, in Amboasary (southern Madagascar). 
Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8950.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018  In the Photo: happy little children showing heart shape hand sign, in Amboasary (southern Madagascar).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 9430.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola, President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, participating in the project.   In this Photo, the 9th step of the transformation: she is holding two packs of gari.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3322 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8532.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Amboasary, Anosy region, 13 December 2018

The (Purchase for progress) P4P programme in Madagascar seeks to increase smallholder farmers’ opportunities and access to agricultural markets, as well as support the economic empowerment of women and men. As part of this programme, small-farmer organizations are jointly assisted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development’s (IFAD) - the three Rome-Based Agencies - and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).  Trainings and technical support to small-holder farmer organizations were provided through specific development programmes implemented by the FAO and IFAD’s AROPA project (Projet d’Appui au renforcement des organisations professionnelles et aux services agricoles). Complementing FAO and IFAD’s efforts, WFP provided trainings on WFP procurement procedures, contracting process, quality, storage improvement, transport and handling of crops, aiming to support small-holder farmers to increase the quantity and quality of their agricultural production. This comprehensive assistance enables small-holder farmers to meet international standards and sell their production surpluses to WFP and other buyers.  As part of the AROPA project, producers benefiting from WFP’s food assistance are empowered to create and work collectively in organizations. These organizations are provided with the necessary equipment and capacity strengthening trainings.  In the Photo: Vola, President of the "Cooperative Mitambatrasoa Bevala", a women’s association producing gari in Amboasary, participating in the project.   In this Photo, the 9th step of the transformation: she is holding two packs of gari.  "The benefits from this project is that is that we have been provided materials by WFP to improve our work; and our Union received money, 70 million ariary. Our production has increased 100% thanks to WFP. Our children go to school and we can buy them school supplies".  Processing cassava to gari offers communities an affordable and adequate food option, particularly during the lean season. The transformation process allows producers to gain better in-comes as gari fetches higher prices on local markets.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181213_W....JPG
4992 x 3322 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8764.00 kb

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