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"(IPTC101 contains(malawi))": 753 results 

 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5481 x 3654 px 46.41 x 30.94 cm 2472.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5737 x 3825 px 48.57 x 32.38 cm 2391.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2425.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2979.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5751 x 3834 px 48.69 x 32.46 cm 2999.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: a R4 participant, digging swales to trap water and retain moisture in her field. In exchange of this labour, she benefits from insurance for drought.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5200 x 3467 px 44.03 x 29.35 cm 2854.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 2543.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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4813 x 3209 px 40.75 x 27.17 cm 2287.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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4087 x 2725 px 34.60 x 23.07 cm 2074.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2729.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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2778 x 4000 px 23.52 x 33.87 cm 2585.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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3228 x 2152 px 27.33 x 18.22 cm 2340.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5030 x 3353 px 42.59 x 28.39 cm 2966.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Cathreen Thomas's daughter preparing maize before bagging. “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Google Maps
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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3992 x 2992 px 33.80 x 25.33 cm 2674.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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