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"(IPTC101 contains(mali))": 920 results 

 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: Cheick, principal of Yarka School, with his students.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 16855.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: "I love going to school. I want to become a teacher so I can help other kids learn," says 11-year-old Fatou.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 11589.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: after eating their school meals, these students have better concentration for their afternoon classes at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 10702.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: children sit eating their school meals together at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 10522.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: children sit eating their school meals together at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 10088.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: children line up to wash their hands before eating their school meals at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 13616.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: Cheick, principal of Yarka School, with his class.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 10087.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: 12-year-old Adiaratou says, "I love the school meals becasue every day I can eat lunch with my friends."  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 7526.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: 12-year-old Adiaratou says, "I love the school meals becasue every day I can eat lunch with my friends."  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
MLI_20160620_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 11551.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo:  children sit and eat their school meals together at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 11027.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo:  children sit and eat their school meals together at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 7642.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo:  children sit and eat their school meals together at Yarka School.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
MLI_20160620_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 9483.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: 12-year-old Adiaratou says, "I love the school meals becasue every day I can eat lunch with my friends."  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
MLI_20160620_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 7789.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a student in class at Yarka School, where WFP implements the school meals programme.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
MLI_20160620_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 13191.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a student in class at Yarka School, where WFP implements the school meals programme.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
MLI_20160620_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 9169.00 kb
 
Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a student in maths class at Yarka School, where WFP implements the school meals programme.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a student in maths class at Yarka School, where WFP implements the school meals programme.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a local woman prepares WFP school meals for the students at Yarka School.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a local woman prepares WFP school meals for the students at Yarka School.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: a sign outlining the amount of cereals, legumes, oil and micronutrient powder assigned to each student per day at Yarka School in the WFP school meals programme.   Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, Kayes Region, Yarka, 20 June 2016  WFP partners with governments on school meals programmes in 41 African nations. In Mali, where gender equality ranks among the lowest in the world, school meals are providing an incentive to keep girls in school.  According to UNICEF, 15 percent of girls in the country are married by the age of 15, and less than 8 percent of women and girls have received a secondary education.   Cheick, the principal of Yarka School in the city of Yarka in Kayes Region – an area with high rates of child marriage and low school attendance – has been advocating for gender equality and child education. “I am committed to keeping young girls in school and raising awareness about the wrongfulness of child marriage,” he said.  In 2003, Cheick went to the Regional Education Facilities to request that WFP’s school meals programme – which provides a daily hot meal to students throughout the country – be implemented in his school.  School meals not only provide nutrition and energy to students, helping them concentrate and learn, they also provide a strong incentive for parents to send their sons and daughters to school, increasing enrolment and retention rates. In Mali, the retention rate for schools supported by WFP’s school meals programme is 98 percent, compared to the national average of 63 percent.  In 2004, WFP began implementing the school meals programme at Yarka, serving lunch to 138 students, 48 of whom are girls. “The school meals play a double role in my school: They prevent students from coming in late and they have curbed dropout rates,” Cheick explained. “They’ve also played an important role in keeping girls in school.”  He started advocacy and awareness-raising sessions in his community, about the importance of educating girls and the dangers of marrying their children off at such a young age.  “Through raising awareness in communities, the number of girls enrolled in school and their retention rate have increased. I’ve also noticed a shift in attitudes about child marriage,” Cheik added.  In the photo: WFP rations are stored at Yarka School before they are used to prepare school meals for the students.  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Rieussec
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Mali, 11 August 2015  WFP has been supporting vulnerable people in Mali since 1964. Currently, WFP’s provides support to people in Mali through two main operations: the emergency operation (EMOP) and the country programme (CP).  In the Photo: Toby Lanzer, OCHA Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel, visiting a WFP-supported Community health Center in Timbuktu  Photo: WFP/Irshad Khan
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Mali, 11 August 2015  WFP has been supporting vulnerable people in Mali since 1964. Currently, WFP’s provides support to people in Mali through two main operations: the emergency operation (EMOP) and the country programme (CP).  In the Photo: Toby Lanzer, OCHA Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel, visiting a WFP-supported Community health Center in Timbuktu with Ibrahima Diop, WFP Deputy Country Director (behind, with grey polo shirt)
 Photo: WFP/Irshad Khan
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Mali, 11 August 2015  WFP has been supporting vulnerable people in Mali since 1964. Currently, WFP’s provides support to people in Mali through two main operations: the emergency operation (EMOP) and the country programme (CP).  In the Photo: Fran Equiza (CD UNICEF Mali), Boubou Camara (CD UNDP Mali, Toby Lanzer (OCHA Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel) and colleagues pose in front of Djinguereber Mosque with the Imam
 Photo: WFP/Irshad Khan
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Mali, 11 August 2015  WFP has been supporting vulnerable people in Mali since 1964. Currently, WFP’s provides support to people in Mali through two main operations: the emergency operation (EMOP) and the country programme (CP).  In the Photo: Toby Lanzer and the Imam of Djinguereber Mosque shake hands inside the Mosque in Timbuktu
 Photo: WFP/Irshad Khan
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