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"(IPTC101 contains(nigeria))": 469 results 

 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9917.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9053.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6183.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6927.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10226.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8359.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8937.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6432.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6114.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8203.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8100.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9084.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6612.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8666.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7943.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8553.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10090.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8160.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7069.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7713.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
4000 x 6000 px 141.11 x 211.67 cm 6602.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6429.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8248.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9626.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Adamawa, Madagali, 30 May 2017  The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields. WFP carried out an emergency food distribution to Adamawa in May 2017 where it reached 30,000 people, including 16,000 in Madagali.  In the photo: beneficiaries receive WFP food assistance at a distribution in Madagali.  Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170530_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8657.00 kb

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