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"(IPTC101 contains(pakistan))": 3004 results 

 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: a shop vendor at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden
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2581 x 1936 px 21.85 x 16.39 cm 1565.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff register beneficiaries for cash assistance using blockchain at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 940.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries learn about the blockchain technology at WFP's Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 1384.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1088.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff register beneficiaries for cash assistance using blockchain at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1524.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: men at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden
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2581 x 1936 px 21.85 x 16.39 cm 2134.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 967.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1310.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: a man carries food rations at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot where beneficiaries receive a combination of in-kind and cash-based assistance.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1311.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff register beneficiaries for cash assistance using blockchain at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 913.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 11 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1348.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 10 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1885.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 10 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff register beneficiaries for cash assistance using blockchain at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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2738 x 1825 px 23.18 x 15.45 cm 1275.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WP food rations at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot where beneficiaries receive a combination of in-kind and cash-based assistance.  Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden
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9921 x 6614 px 8.27 x 5.51 cm 18628.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden
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1936 x 2581 px 16.39 x 21.85 cm 1075.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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1825 x 2738 px 15.45 x 23.18 cm 1271.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 09 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: children at WFP's Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Farman Ali
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9921 x 5163 px 8.27 x 4.30 cm 23615.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 12 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: WFP staff at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden
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2582 x 1936 px 21.86 x 16.39 cm 1795.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 10 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries learn about the blockchain technology at WFP's Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 09 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries at WFP's Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 09 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and with multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: beneficiaries learn about the blockchain technology at WFP's Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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Pakistan, Sindh Province, Umerkot, 10 January 2017  In areas where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers (CBTs) allow beneficiaries to choose what food to buy. WFP's Innovation Accelerator is exploring approached to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.  One such approach is blockchain - a technology that has the potential to transform how cash is transferred. Put simply, blockchain is a cutting-edge way to structure and organise data. The blockchain is a type of distributed digital ledger hosted across a network of multiple participants. As a ‘trustless’ structure (meaning no party on the network needs to trust each other), it provides a way to share information and transfer digital assets in a fast, tracked and secure way. By storing data in blocks which are immutable and secure, and withe multiple actors holding copies, the risk of fraud, theft or manipulation is reduced to near zero. Furthermore, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for third party verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. Through cost savings, the traceability of information flows, and by reducing transaction times, WFP can deliver more effective, efficient interventions.  The first successful test at field level of WFP's blockchain innovation - called 'Building Blocks' - was carried out in January 2017 deep in the heart of Sindh Province. "Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster," said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.  In the photo: equipment used by staff to resiger beneficiaries for cash assistance at the Building Blocks pilot programme in Umerkot.  Photo: WFP/Houman Haddad
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Pakistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Nowshera district, 3 September 2015  With support from Pakistan and other donors, WFP has been developing a network of eight humanitarian response facilities in parts of the country most prone to natural disasters, with the aim of augmenting the emergency and disaster response capability of the government and the international humanitarian community in Pakistan.   Partners – National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), Provincial Disaster Management Authorities (PDMAs), private sector  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Pakistan, Karachi, Sindh, 9 September 2015  English Biscuit Manufacturers (PVT) Ltd. factory.  WFP’s nutritional product development in Pakistan is a model for other countries and plays an important role in decreasing child malnutrition throughout the region. Strong partnerships between the public and private sectors enable the development of these nutritional supplements.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Pakistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Nowshera district, Jalozai camp basic health unit, 3 September 2015  The Government of Pakistan has advanced a range of programmes, policies and strategies that have created new transformational opportunities to ensure the country’s continued growth, including augmented preparedness and response to climatic events. Since 2013, the Government of Pakistan has contributed 519,000 metric tons of wheat valued at US$198 million and has become one of the largest host government donors to the World Food Programme (WFP) worldwide. Between 2013 and 2015, the partnership between WFP and the Government of Pakistan has enhanced the food security and nutrition of 7.4 million Pakistanis which has contributed towards the country’s significant progress in these areas.  In the Photo: a view of the Jalozai camp.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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