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"(IPTC101 contains(rwanda))": 1496 results 

 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   In the photo: the land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3382.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   In the photo: the land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3985.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   In the photo: the land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5157.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5284.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5295.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6135.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6099.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4344.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production. Under WFP’s community asset creation and rehabilitation programme which aims to reduce poverty, increase living standards and improve food security in the District. The project’s implementation model combines WFP’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) expertise with the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement) approach to rural development. Through FFA activities, the project provided cash-based transfers for households vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, the majority of whom farm small plots of steeply-sloping land with poor quality soil.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5748.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6419.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5460.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4849.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161112_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3833.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3877.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4654.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6960.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 9765.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3729.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3359.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4996.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5047.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Cyanika, Nyamagabe District, 12 November 2016  The "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" Project is a hybrid combination of the WFP’s asset creation model and the Republic of Korea’s Saemaul Undong approach, aimed at devising durable hunger solutions. The project started in 2011 in areas where the majority of people live on small plots of land on hilly area. In these areas, the soil is poor and prone to erosion. Before the project started, the area was characterised by constant high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition rates measured at 55 percent. The project has also supported the construction of classrooms, water facilities and houses for the most vulnerable in the community.  Farmers used to work, on barren land from which they struggled to harvest a good quantity of crops and could not provide enough food to feed their families. Thanks to the "Saemaul Zero Hunger Community" project, supported by WFP and the Republic of Korea, the farmer’s land was terraced, they were given fertiliser and high quality seeds to improve production.  Before the land was terraced, harvest was poor but now the harvest produced by this small farmers cooperative yields more than 15 tones of Irish potatoes on a plot of terraced land of only 6 hectares. This is enough to feed the farmers families and to send some of their produce for sale at the market.   The land at the bottom of the valleys is more fertile and has better access to water. Through the project the irrigation channels are being improved to exploit the land in the best possible fashion.  In the Photo: Susanne Mukandida.  Sylvestre Nzabamwita, 62 and his wife Susanne Mukandida, 49  are parents to seven children. Only two of their children still live under their roof, the others are married. They are a beneficiaries of the marshland reclaimed under the first phase of the Saemaul Zero Hunger Communities project implemented by WFP and funded by the government of Korea in Nyamagabe. On reclaimed land they are now able to harvest 100kg of maize on 500 square meters of land during the dry season. This allows them to survive until till the next rainy season when the terraced land on the hillsides can be cultivated. With the food that they harvest from the marshland, Sylvestre and Susanne are able to save around RWF 300,000 every year. “My dream is to become a professional farmer” said Sylvestre.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5629.00 kb

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