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"(IPTC101 contains(senegal))": 528 results 

 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 28 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: pupils of the Sinthiou Mogo school having their lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 4466.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 28 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary. Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Diary Sy poses in her classroom.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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3168 x 4752 px 111.76 x 167.64 cm 6232.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 28 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary. Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Diary Sy (in yellow) poses with Fatou Diop, "the President" and her school mates.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 6548.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 27 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary. Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Diary Sy having lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 5238.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 27 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: pupils of the Sinthiou Mogo school having their lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 5468.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 27 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Lena Savelli, WFP Representative and Country Director in Senegal, serves food at the Sinthiou Mogo school near Matam.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 7262.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 27 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Diary Sy (second from Right) together with pupils of the Sinthiou Mogo school having their lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 6253.00 kb
 
Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 27 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: pupils of the Sinthiou Mogo school having their lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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4752 x 3168 px 167.64 x 111.76 cm 6855.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 13 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2401.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 13 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a view of the Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2423.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 13 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a view of the Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2363.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 13 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a view of the Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2320.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 12 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2560.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 12 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2283.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 12 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2406.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 12 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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2592 x 3872 px 21.95 x 32.78 cm 2535.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 11 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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2592 x 3872 px 21.95 x 32.78 cm 2498.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 11 January 2017  Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) is a practical and easy-to-use planning tool for vulnerable communities, government extension staff and cooperating partners. It is a two- to five-day field exercise used to develop a three-year programme plan. Through CBPP, food-insecure communities are placed in the driver’s seat of planning, while contributing to their own resilience building efforts and development. Overall, the CBPP links people to their landscapes and provides the entry point for scaling up resilience-building activities through assets creation and complementary partners’ efforts. For example, Food assistance (through food, cash or voucher transfers) for assets (FFA) can restore access to food through the rehabilitation of degraded lands, feeder roads and market infrastructure, and build disaster resilience.  In the Photo: a Community-based Participatory Planning (CBPP) and mapping training in Khoutiacoto village, Senegal.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 2380.00 kb
 
Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 25 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: R4 participants receive an insurance payout in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 25 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: R4 participants receive an insurance payout in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 08 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: farmers attending a WFP-OXFAM index insurance training in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 08 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: farmers attending a WFP-OXFAM index insurance training in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 26 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: farmers attending a WFP-OXFAM index insurance training in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 26 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: an animatrice teaches farmers about index insurance in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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Senegal, Khoutiacoto village, 26 March 2015  The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative in Senegal Comprehensive climate resilience for long-term food security and livelihoods  The question of how to build rural resilience against climate-related risk is therefore critical to help food insecure communities secure and improve their lives and livelihoods in the face of climate change, while keeping their growth trajectories despite shocks. Building resilience to climate-related risks is critical to help secure the income and livelihoods of the food-insecure.  To address this challenge, WFP and Oxfam America launched the Rural Resilience Initiative (R4) in 2011. R4 enables food-insecure rural households to manage weather vulnerability through a comprehensive risk management approach that can be integrated into national social protection systems. R4 builds on the Horn of Africa Risk Transfer for Adaptation (HARITA) initiative, founded in Ethiopia in 2009 by Oxfam America, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), the global re-insurance company Swiss Re and a number of national partners. HARITA was a pioneer in rural risk management by allowing Ethiopia’s poorest farmers to pay for crop insurance through the Insurance for Assets (IFA) mechanism. Its success led the initial partners, joined by WFP, to form the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative.   R4 enables vulnerable farmers to strengthen their food security through an integrated risk management approach combining four components: improved resource management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking), and savings (risk reserves).  In the Photo: the OXFAM-WFP R4 seeds bank in Khoutiacoto.  Photo: WFP/Carla De Gregorio
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