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"(IPTC101 contains(south sudan))": 2588 results 

 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 299.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 211.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 375.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 303.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 473.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 449.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 426.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 480.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 788.00 kb
 
South Sudan, 04 October 2018  In the Photo: aerial view of the Nile, South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 245.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14752.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6119 x 4079 px 51.81 x 34.54 cm 12008.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15346.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14540.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14487.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 13837.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 13687.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 16034.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 16542.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 17614.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 13154.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14554.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15154.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14514.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14989.00 kb

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