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"(IPTC101 contains(south sudan))": 2254 results 

 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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6914 x 4612 px 58.54 x 39.05 cm 7161.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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7952 x 5304 px 67.33 x 44.91 cm 7731.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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7952 x 5304 px 67.33 x 44.91 cm 8724.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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7054 x 4705 px 59.72 x 39.84 cm 6414.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 04 April 2018  Madonna Kanisio, the mobile Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping (mVAM) focal point with the World Food Programme (WFP) in South Sudan, left the country due to the war when she was a baby. But when the opportunity to join WFP South Sudan presented itself in 2015, she returned to help those who had remained. Here she tells her story.  I’m from South Sudan, but I’ve lived in the diaspora almost all my life — my parents left because of war when I was two months old. I spent my childhood and adolescence in Khartoum, Egypt, the UK, Kenya, and Uganda. After completing high school, I went to Malaysia University before working for Streamline Studios, a video game development company and art outsourcing company (which was also involved in producing James Cameron’s Avatar!) Work there was super fun and I loved travelling around Asia. But in October 2015, I decided to return to South Sudan to make a difference in my home country.  Here in the country office, as the mVAM focal point, I’m part of the whole process from data collection to analysis and reporting. My colleagues and I collect household food security data through an in-house call centre. At the end of the collection period, I download the data from the server to analyse different indicators and keep an eye for trends and changes over time to include in the report. Then I move on to the bulletin, where we summarise the food security situation to help the decision makers monitor and react to the latest developments. The most rewarding aspect of my job is certainly being at the forefront of WFP’s work, providing assistance that saves lives. I couldn’t have wished for more from my work — it is so fulfilling to have a job that is no longer just about me.  I am especially excited about numbers and the difference they can make. That’s why I find analysing and reporting interesting — that’s when numbers become key trends and important findings, which influence programming. Particularly through visual storytelling and presentation design, numbers can have a strong impact. Recently, we conducted a remote food security assessment in Torit town, near the border with Uganda, where there was reported to be dire food insecurity. The analyses we did there led to the distribution of food. I vividly remember the next time we called in the town, residents were thanking us, literally saying “we would have died if it hadn’t been for you and WFP.” That was one of the happiest moments in my life. But obviously, my job can also be heartbreaking. I had only worked with WFP for two weeks when we visited a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs). As I got out of our van, all I could see were thousands of plastic sheet tents. People’s living conditions in the camp were awful and their stories tragic. This experience broke me to the point of wanting to resign as it was unbearable to see this and then go home at the end of the day to the life that seemed comfortable to me. I felt like I wasn’t doing enough. But in the end, my father made me realise that working for people who are in this situation is exactly what counts. So this experience just made me work even harder, despite the difficulties that are inherent in this sort of environment, to ensure that the right information is being delivered to the right people to enable the best interventions. In the future, I would like to become a data scientist. I find it fascinating how data can be transformed into a story using the right tools and analyses. It’s similar to an archaeologist telling a story about a civilisation from the artifacts he or she finds. And data is everywhere, floating around in huge quantities, just waiting to be translated! I am also hopeful about the future of the people of South Sudan. I believe a time of peace and prosperity will come where lives will flourish and the situation will change for the better.  In the Photo: After living abroad for much of her life, Madonna returned to South Sudan to work for WFP.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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3582 x 5371 px 30.33 x 45.47 cm 3254.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 04 April 2018  Madonna Kanisio, the mobile Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping (mVAM) focal point with the World Food Programme (WFP) in South Sudan, left the country due to the war when she was a baby. But when the opportunity to join WFP South Sudan presented itself in 2015, she returned to help those who had remained. Here she tells her story.  I’m from South Sudan, but I’ve lived in the diaspora almost all my life — my parents left because of war when I was two months old. I spent my childhood and adolescence in Khartoum, Egypt, the UK, Kenya, and Uganda. After completing high school, I went to Malaysia University before working for Streamline Studios, a video game development company and art outsourcing company (which was also involved in producing James Cameron’s Avatar!) Work there was super fun and I loved travelling around Asia. But in October 2015, I decided to return to South Sudan to make a difference in my home country.  Here in the country office, as the mVAM focal point, I’m part of the whole process from data collection to analysis and reporting. My colleagues and I collect household food security data through an in-house call centre. At the end of the collection period, I download the data from the server to analyse different indicators and keep an eye for trends and changes over time to include in the report. Then I move on to the bulletin, where we summarise the food security situation to help the decision makers monitor and react to the latest developments. The most rewarding aspect of my job is certainly being at the forefront of WFP’s work, providing assistance that saves lives. I couldn’t have wished for more from my work — it is so fulfilling to have a job that is no longer just about me.  I am especially excited about numbers and the difference they can make. That’s why I find analysing and reporting interesting — that’s when numbers become key trends and important findings, which influence programming. Particularly through visual storytelling and presentation design, numbers can have a strong impact. Recently, we conducted a remote food security assessment in Torit town, near the border with Uganda, where there was reported to be dire food insecurity. The analyses we did there led to the distribution of food. I vividly remember the next time we called in the town, residents were thanking us, literally saying “we would have died if it hadn’t been for you and WFP.” That was one of the happiest moments in my life. But obviously, my job can also be heartbreaking. I had only worked with WFP for two weeks when we visited a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs). As I got out of our van, all I could see were thousands of plastic sheet tents. People’s living conditions in the camp were awful and their stories tragic. This experience broke me to the point of wanting to resign as it was unbearable to see this and then go home at the end of the day to the life that seemed comfortable to me. I felt like I wasn’t doing enough. But in the end, my father made me realise that working for people who are in this situation is exactly what counts. So this experience just made me work even harder, despite the difficulties that are inherent in this sort of environment, to ensure that the right information is being delivered to the right people to enable the best interventions. In the future, I would like to become a data scientist. I find it fascinating how data can be transformed into a story using the right tools and analyses. It’s similar to an archaeologist telling a story about a civilisation from the artifacts he or she finds. And data is everywhere, floating around in huge quantities, just waiting to be translated! I am also hopeful about the future of the people of South Sudan. I believe a time of peace and prosperity will come where lives will flourish and the situation will change for the better.  In the Photo: After living abroad for much of her life, Madonna returned to South Sudan to work for WFP.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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6927 x 4621 px 58.65 x 39.12 cm 6133.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jaszeera, Rubcona County, 25 March 2018  In the Photo: Julia Akando, a Fiel Assistant conducts registrations in Jaszeera, Rubcona County.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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5304 x 7952 px 44.91 x 67.33 cm 12810.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jaszeera, Rubcona County, 25 March 2018  In the Photo: Julia Akando, a Fiel Assistant conducts registrations in Jaszeera, Rubcona County.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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7001 x 4670 px 59.28 x 39.54 cm 6522.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jazeera, Rubcona County, 24 March 2018  In the Photo: A girl awaits her turn during a WFP registration in Jazeera, Rubcona County  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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4036 x 6051 px 34.17 x 51.23 cm 7679.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jazeera, Rubcona County, 24 March 2018  In the Photo: Lilian Mokgosi, Head of Gender and Protection Unit in South Sudan WFP Country Office prepares to distribute ration cards during a headcount exercise in Jazeera, Rubcona County.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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3254 x 4878 px 27.55 x 41.30 cm 5632.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: Women wait for screening at Maper Health Centre. WFP provides treatment and prevention services to more than 1.6 million acutely malnourished women and children in South Sudan. Enrolment in WFP’s nutrition activities depends on clinical indicators of malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8356.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: A health worker encodes a client’s data into WFP’s SCOPE system, a cloud-based digital beneficiary identity and assistance management system. Technology is enabling health workers in South Sudan to record information, track an individual’s nutrition and health status and identify when a person has recovered and treatment is successful.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7855.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: Women wait for screening at Maper Health Centre. WFP provides treatment and prevention services to more than 1.6 million acutely malnourished women and children in South Sudan. Enrolment in WFP’s nutrition activities depends on clinical indicators of malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
SSD_20180313_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6671.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: An aid worker takes a child’s mid upper circumference readings to establish if the child is malnourished. WFP provides treatment and prevention services to more than 1.6 million acutely malnourished women and children in South Sudan. Enrolment in WFP’s nutrition activities depends on clinical indicators of malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7786.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: Aid workers from UNICEF and British charity MedAIR chat with WFP Deputy Head of Nutrition, Dina Aburmishan at Maper Health Centre in Aweil.   Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6758.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: An aid worker takes a child’s mid upper circumference readings to establish if the child is malnourished. WFP provides treatment and prevention services to more than 1.6 million acutely malnourished women and children in South Sudan. Enrolment in WFP’s nutrition activities depends on clinical indicators of malnutrition.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
SSD_20180313_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7338.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: A health worker encodes a client’s data into WFP’s SCOPE system, a cloud-based digital beneficiary identity and assistance management system. Technology is enabling health workers in South Sudan to record information, track an individual’s nutrition and health status and identify when a person has recovered and treatment is successful.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 5554.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Aweil, Northern Bahr el Ghazal State. 13 March 2018.  Food insecurity in South Sudan has reached the most extreme levels since independence in 2011. Famine has eased after a significant scale up in the humanitarian response. However, the situation remains dire across the country as the number of people struggling to find enough food each day has grown to 6.3 million.  WFP and UNICEF have continued their succesful partnership to intensify the nutrition response in South Sudan. WFP has provided treatment to malnourished children, pregnant women and nursing mothers, in addition to training community nutrition volunteers.   In the Photo: A health worker delivers a health education and promotion to waiting pregnant and nursing mothers at Maper Health Centre in Aweil centre, north of the capital Juba. To ensure the most vulnerable receive the food and education needed to build a healthy lifestyle for the entire family, WFP integrates nutrition throughout all its activities in South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Tomson Phiri
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6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6229.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 02 March 2018  An aid worker helps a woman to carry a box of vegetable oil on her head. The IPC says that large-scale humanitarian assistance in the last quarter of 2017 prevented food insecurity from deteriorating for people in 17 counties and halted a real risk of famine in the Greater Baggari region. But for famine to be averted again, the response must continue through 2018. Haat is one of many remote and hard-to-reach locations in Ayod County. To reach people in need, WFP uses helicopters or Ilyushin aircraft to airdrop food.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5832.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 02 March 2018  A woman carries a box of vegetable oil from USAID on her head. Donors provided funding in 2017 enabling WFP to mount an early and effective response which staved off famine in the country. WFP is appealing to the international community to step-up to ensure that they can continue to reach families struggling to survive. Urgent funding is required if great loss of life is to be avoided.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5806.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 02 March 2018  An aid worker helps a woman to carry a box of vegetable oil on her head. The IPC says that large-scale humanitarian assistance in the last quarter of 2017 prevented food insecurity from deteriorating for people in 17 counties and halted a real risk of famine in the Greater Baggari region. But for famine to be averted again, the response must continue through 2018. Haat is one of many remote and hard-to-reach locations in Ayod County. To reach people in need, WFP uses helicopters or Ilyushin aircraft to airdrop food.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
SSD_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5624.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 02 March 2018  A woman carries a box of vegetable oil from USAID on her head. Donors provided funding in 2017 enabling WFP to mount an early and effective response which staved off famine in the country. WFP is appealing to the international community to step-up to ensure that they can continue to reach families struggling to survive. Urgent funding is required if great loss of life is to be avoided.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
SSD_20180302_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6572.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 02 March 2018  A woman carries a box of vegetable oil from USAID on her head. Donors provided funding in 2017 enabling WFP to mount an early and effective response which staved off famine in the country. WFP is appealing to the international community to step-up to ensure that they can continue to reach families struggling to survive. Urgent funding is required if great loss of life is to be avoided.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4970.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 01 March 2018  A boy undergoes a Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) test in Haat, Ayod County. Food insecurity is deteriorating across South Sudan because conflict and economic collapse continue to destroy lives and livelihoods.  The number of displaced and refugees only increase as more people become destitute and dependent on assistance.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6912.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Haat, Ayod County (Jonglei state), 01 March 2018  A family prepares water lilies collected from a nearby river for food at their homestead in Haat, Ayod County. Food insecurity is deteriorating across South Sudan because conflict and economic collapse continue to destroy lives and livelihoods.  The number of displaced and refugees only increase as more people become destitute and dependent on assistance.  Photo: WFP/Peter Louis
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7955.00 kb

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