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"(IPTC101 contains(sudan)) and not (IPTC101 contains(south))": 4644 results 

 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8197.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 3904.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6160.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4800.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5267.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6007.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7602.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 12088.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8655.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7820.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5064.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6851.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4492.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 10220.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6754.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6689.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5529.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4044.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4622.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5492.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 9275.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8546.00 kb
 
Sudan, Fardous North, 22 November 2016  Resumption of school meals in Blue Nile after a five-year hiatus.  Following a more than five-year hiatus, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) resumed its school meals programme in Sudan’s Blue Nile State this week for more than 7,000 students in 21 schools. Insecurity and lack of access had forced WFP to suspend the programme in September 2011. Prior to this interruption, WFP had provided school meals to around 70,000 students throughout Blue Nile State.   Providing school meals is WFP’s longest-running programme in Sudan. Since 1969, WFP has been assisting millions of schoolchildren through its school meals programme. The programme currently provides school meals to almost one million children in Sudan, more than half of whom come from displaced and other vulnerable families in the Darfur region. School meals provide an emergency safety net to schoolchildren and help to ensure that children, particularly girls, receive the education to which they are entitled. In the eastern states of Kassala and Red Sea, WFP has been providing take-home rations to 5,000 schoolgirls in selected schools where girls’ enrolment is extremely low. As a result, the number of girls attending school is now close to that of boys.  In the Photo: the Abubakr AlSiddig School, Fardous North.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8173.00 kb
 
Sudan, Habila, West Darfur, 21 September 2016  Safe Access to Fuel and Energy  To achieve Zero Hunger, the delivery of food assistance  cannot be separated from the numerous safety, health, and environmental risks associated with properly cooking it.   Under SAFE/Food for Asset Creation Project, WFP supported the training of women in tree planting, nursery and water management, environment protection and revolving fund management. With new skills and knowledge acquired from the training, the women organized themselves into a group and set up a tree nursery. For five months in 2012, WFP supported the training of 31 women in food processing, baking and in developing a business plan including the management of a revolving fund. After completing the training, the women formed agroup and put together a small capital to start a bakery business, baking some 500 pieces of traditional bread (eeish baladi) which they sell in the local market at the price of one Sudanese Pound (US 20 cents) a piece. Part of the money that they earn from selling bread is put into a revolving fund to provide small loans to members of the group. They now have an accumulated savings of SDG 4,500 (approximately US$ 750) which they will use as capital to expand their business.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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Sudan, Habila, West Darfur, 21 September 2016  Safe Access to Fuel and Energy  To achieve Zero Hunger, the delivery of food assistance  cannot be separated from the numerous safety, health, and environmental risks associated with properly cooking it. Through the provision of fuel-efficient stoves and livelihood opportunities, WFP’s SAFE initiative addresses the dangers people face when collecting and using firewood.  WFP aims to provide safe energy and cooking to 10 million people by 2020.   Under SAFE/Food for Asset Creation Project, WFP supported the training of women in tree planting, nursery and water management, environment protection and revolving fund management. With new skills and knowledge acquired from the training, the women organized themselves into a group and set up a tree nursery. The tree nursery enabled the women to generate cash income from the sale of seedlings to farmers in villages surrounding Habila town. Part of the income generated is saved in the revolving fund which offers small loans to group members. The other part is used by the women to support their household needs.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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