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"(IPTC101 contains(swaziland))": 287 results 

 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson at a WFP food distribution in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Claudia Altorio
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3648 x 2048 px 51.48 x 28.90 cm 1887.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson at a WFP food distribution in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Claudia Altorio
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3648 x 2048 px 51.48 x 28.90 cm 1974.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Sithobela, 29 June 2016  The intense El Niño weather event has brought devastating drought to southern Africa and caused a second failed harvest that has left many farming families reeling. Around 18 million people need emergency humanitarian assistance in the coming months. The World Food Programme has declared a Level 3 emergency – the highest ranking – for seven priority countries: Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. WFP is rapidly stepping up life-saving operations and is reaching growing numbers of people with food and cash-based relief, while strengthening resilience building. These are some of the faces and stories of people supported by WFP.  In the Photo: Vuyisile Shabungu is married with four children and lives in Sithobela in Swaziland. She received food at a distribution during the first cycle of WFP’s emergency relief operation in Sithobela at the end of June.  “Since I was born, this is the first time I’ve experienced such a drought. The situation is very, very bad. We don’t know what we’re going to eat from one day to the next. The water sources are so dry. We worked in our fields but we didn’t harvest anything. Other years, we could go to the fields and get something, but not this year. The water sources are so dry. Things are so bad that people are going to the hospital because of hunger. The food I’ve got from WFP will help because we have nothing to eat at home. Sometimes, we get something to eat from the neighbours. Other times, we go to bed without eating anything in the evening.  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6371.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Sithobela, 29 June 2016  The intense El Niño weather event has brought devastating drought to southern Africa and caused a second failed harvest that has left many farming families reeling. Around 18 million people need emergency humanitarian assistance in the coming months. The World Food Programme has declared a Level 3 emergency – the highest ranking – for seven priority countries: Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. WFP is rapidly stepping up life-saving operations and is reaching growing numbers of people with food and cash-based relief, while strengthening resilience building. These are some of the faces and stories of people supported by WFP.  In the Photo: Xolile Nkabindze is married with three children and lives in Sithobela in Swaziland.  “I make sure the children eat but yesterday my husband and I went to bed hungry. The neighbours help when they can. Everyone I know is in the same position. It is very difficult this year. Most people are hungry. We planted cassava and sorghum twice in 2015, in October and December, but there wasn’t any rain so there was no harvest. Everyone I know is in the same position. Some people are so hungry, they’re getting sick and going to the health clinics to get food. The food we got from WFP will make a real difference, I’ll make sure it lasts a month.”  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 6242.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Sithobela, 29 June 2016  The intense El Niño weather event has brought devastating drought to southern Africa and caused a second failed harvest that has left many farming families reeling. Around 18 million people need emergency humanitarian assistance in the coming months. The World Food Programme has declared a Level 3 emergency – the highest ranking – for seven priority countries: Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. WFP is rapidly stepping up life-saving operations and is reaching growing numbers of people with food and cash-based relief, while strengthening resilience building. These are some of the faces and stories of people supported by WFP.  In the Photo: Maphindane Mamba looks after his partner and three children in Sithobela, Swaziland.  “We use any money we earn to buy food for the children. The adults often go to bed without eating anything. Last year, I planted in September but there was no rain. WFP food will keep us going a few weeks. When the rain came this year it was not enough, and so we harvested very little this year. It wasn’t enough to feed us. So we have to find casual jobs just to get some money for food. The situation is particularly hard for the elderly people in the community because they depend on their families to look after them. I’m very glad we got food today from WFP, it’ll keep us going for a few weeks.”  Photo: WFP/David Orr
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 5341.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 886.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: a WFP distribution site in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 845.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: a WFP distribution site in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 941.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 956.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to members of the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 863.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to members of the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 810.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to members of the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 935.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to members of the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 891.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson at a distribution - supported by WFP's partners, World Vision, National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) - of non-food hygiene items in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 888.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to staff from one of WFP's partners, the Swaziland Ministry of Health, who are ensuring that their peers can make informed choices on sexual health as well as protecting themselves from disease (26 percent of the population aged 15-49 live with HIV).  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 860.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson visits the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 877.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson visits a WFP distribution site in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 987.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson visits a WFP distribution site in the El Niño drought-affected community of Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 957.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson visits the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 961.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 828.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 933.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 927.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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5184 x 3456 px 54.86 x 36.58 cm 852.00 kb
 
Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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Swaziland, Dvokodvweni, 29 August 2016  United Nations Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate, Mary Robinson, visited Swaziland from 29-31 August 2016 as a guest of the 36th Ordinary Summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). She met with El Niño-affected children and families to assess and understand the situation, including both immediate and long-term actions needed to address the climate threat.   In 2015 and 2016, Southern Africa experienced the driest agricultural season of the past 35 years as a result of the El Niño phenomenon. Swaziland – where 77 percent of the population relies on subsistence farming for their livelihoods – was one of the countries in the region hardest hit by drought. The exceptional lack of precipitation, compounded by the impact of poor rainfall the previous year, resulted in significant losses of rain-fed yields, underperforming irrigated crops, and poor pasture conditions. This has contributed to an increasingly critical situation, with food insecurity affecting over 30 percent of the population.   During her visit, Mary Robinson highlighted the need for communities, humanitarian partners and governments to expect and prepare for climate change-related weather events like El Niño and La Niña in the future.   In the photo: Mary Robinson talks to the El Niño drought-affected community in Dvokodvweni.  Photo: WFP/Ivor Coglin
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