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"(IPTC101 contains(turkey))": 481 results 

 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 7am: Mohammed and Fatma wake up. Mohammed and Fatma have coffee together every morning before Mohammed goes to work at a soap factory. They make traditional Syrian coffee in their ibrik on the stove.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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4000 x 6000 px 33.87 x 50.80 cm 12938.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 7am: Mohammed and Fatma wake up. Mohammed and Fatma have coffee together every morning before Mohammed goes to work at a soap factory. They make traditional Syrian coffee in their ibrik on the stove.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 13786.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 9am: The children wake up and get ready for the day. The three children, Bushra, Mariam, and Mohammed, sleep in one room, on cushions that are laid out on the floor. The first thing they do in the morning is have their breakfast, which is usually warm milk. Later, their local relatives come by to visit. They try to see their extended family three to four times a week.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 11353.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 11am: The children get started on their homework. Mariam, the oldest daughter gets started on her school work – today, it's maths. Fatma teaches the younger two children at home, to prepare them for school when they're ready to go.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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4000 x 6000 px 33.87 x 50.80 cm 10078.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 11am: The children get started on their homework. Mariam, the oldest daughter gets started on her school work – today, it's maths. Fatma teaches the younger two children at home, to prepare them for school when they're ready to go.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12395.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 11am: The children get started on their homework. Fatma and her niece Hiba are looking at a picture of Hiba and her older sister dancing at a relative's wedding. For the wedding, Hiba's parents bought her a new T-shirt, and she likes to save it only for special occasions.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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2100 x 1400 px 17.78 x 11.85 cm 1910.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 1pm: The family come together for lunch. They're having their usual lunch of pita bread, cheese, and mint. The spread is laid out on the floor in one of the rooms, which is also used as the parent's bedroom at night. Fatma tends to buy food from the vegetable market downtown, where other refugees from Aleppo have stalls and shops. She prefers the market to the supermarket as she can chat with other refugees and also can negotiate on price.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 11433.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 1pm: The family come together for lunch. They're having their usual lunch of pita bread, cheese, and mint. The spread is laid out on the floor in one of the rooms, which is also used as the parent's bedroom at night. Fatma tends to buy food from the vegetable market downtown, where other refugees from Aleppo have stalls and shops. She prefers the market to the supermarket as she can chat with other refugees and also can negotiate on price. Mohammed sneaks a piece of eggplant from the kitchen as his mother prepares lunch.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 8973.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: Bushra (front) and Mariam (behind) are thrilled because their mother has surprised them with new jeans and T-shirts in their favourite colours. Getting new clothes is a rarity for the family, as they usually do not have enough money to buy them. However, the children sometimes like to swap clothes with the neighbours.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 10256.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: The apartment has a small yard where Bushra (left) and Mohammed (right) like to play patty-cake.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 9362.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: The apartment has a small yard where where Mohammed rides his new bike that he has been dreaming of.   Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 10927.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: Fatma had an apartment which she decorated back in Syria. Here in Turkey, she had to build a home from scratch. When her husband is at work, Fatma gets started on the household chores to give her children a cosy home.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 10316.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: Mohammed uses a smartphone app to contact his relatives in Syria every day, exchanging voice notes and photos. His son always waits for his father to come home from work, in order to see if there are any new incoming messages, as he doesn't like missing out on any news.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12663.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 8pm: Dinner. The family always makes sure they spend time together. While Fatma talks to a relative on the phone, her husband Mohammed is playing with the children.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12444.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 8pm: It's time for dinner. Like with lunch, the family always makes sure to eat with each other. Today they are having rice and aubergines for dinner, which is their staple meal. Once a year, they can save up enough to have meat instead.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12082.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 10pm: The neighbours come by for tea. There are a few other Syrian refugee families living around the area, and they like to spend the evenings together. They often support each other in times of hardship and share news with each other.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 11987.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: Mariam holding an ESSN card.  Innovative EU-funded cash assistance programme in Turkey reached to hundreds of thousands of refugees in Turkey to support them for their essential needs.   Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 8588.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used ele
TUR_20161129_W....JPG
3056 x 4592 px 22.18 x 33.32 cm 4130.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4913.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
TUR_20161129_W....JPG
4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4689.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
TUR_20161129_W....JPG
4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 3985.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used ele
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3056 x 4592 px 22.18 x 33.32 cm 3716.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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Turkey, 3 October 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: 36 year-old Safa (right), a mother of 8 from Syria, fills the ESSN application form with her sister-in-law Dalal at a registration centre in southern Turkey. “My husband spends most of his days collecting paper from garbage bins and sells them to recycling factories, despite having leg pains. He is out in the streets all day trying to make ends meet. This is why we need your help,” she says.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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