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"(IPTC101 contains(uganda))": 2665 results 

 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3804.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4220.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4642.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4918.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4743.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3864.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Bidibidi, 20 June 2018  In May this year the UN Security Council passed a resolution that acknowledges the link between hunger and conflict. Karina, one of WFP’s newly trained Storytellers in Bidibidi, Uganda, tells us why peace in South Sudan is the only solution to hunger.  In the Photo: Mamcy Karina, aged 19, from Lutoko has eight brothers and sisters and a seven-month old son.  “The war finally came to us on a day in July 2016 at 9am. There was a soldier near my house calling my uncle’s name — he was threatening to burn our house. Others were crying. We didn’t know war was going to come. He was wearing a coat with a gun.  Soon we couldn’t go out into the garden to dig for food anymore, also getting money was a problem. We faced hunger.    When you’re as hungry as I was, you can think of even dying. To get food my father had to sell all his cows. But even that wasn’t enough to feed a family as big as mine.  Eventually, my father sent me to Uganda. I came with my younger sister Jeanette and brother Daniel. We got a vehicle, we closed all the windows and came slowly. There were vehicles set on fire and burning and we had to keep quiet, I was panicking all along the way. At last, when we passed the river I heard our driver say “thank god we are now alive. We have reached safety— Nimule.” I had never heard of the place before.  We were stuck for two weeks in the reception centre — it was packed — food and water was a problem. As soon as I came to Bidibidi, WFP gave us beans, maize, oil and we felt better. I got pregnant a few months later, and had to leave school to have Godfrey. I will go back and get an education once he is crawling and my mother can take care of him.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Bidibidi, 20 June 2018  In May this year the UN Security Council passed a resolution that acknowledges the link between hunger and conflict. Karina, one of WFP’s newly trained Storytellers in Bidibidi, Uganda, tells us why peace in South Sudan is the only solution to hunger.  In the Photo: Mamcy Karina, aged 19, from Lutoko has eight brothers and sisters and a seven-month old son.  “The war finally came to us on a day in July 2016 at 9am. There was a soldier near my house calling my uncle’s name — he was threatening to burn our house. Others were crying. We didn’t know war was going to come. He was wearing a coat with a gun.  Soon we couldn’t go out into the garden to dig for food anymore, also getting money was a problem. We faced hunger.    When you’re as hungry as I was, you can think of even dying. To get food my father had to sell all his cows. But even that wasn’t enough to feed a family as big as mine.  Eventually, my father sent me to Uganda. I came with my younger sister Jeanette and brother Daniel. We got a vehicle, we closed all the windows and came slowly. There were vehicles set on fire and burning and we had to keep quiet, I was panicking all along the way. At last, when we passed the river I heard our driver say “thank god we are now alive. We have reached safety— Nimule.” I had never heard of the place before.  We were stuck for two weeks in the reception centre — it was packed — food and water was a problem. As soon as I came to Bidibidi, WFP gave us beans, maize, oil and we felt better. I got pregnant a few months later, and had to leave school to have Godfrey. I will go back and get an education once he is crawling and my mother can take care of him.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Bidibidi, 20 June 2018  In May this year the UN Security Council passed a resolution that acknowledges the link between hunger and conflict. Karina, one of WFP’s newly trained Storytellers in Bidibidi, Uganda, tells us why peace in South Sudan is the only solution to hunger.  In the Photo: Mamcy Karina, aged 19, from Lutoko has eight brothers and sisters and a seven-month old son.  “The war finally came to us on a day in July 2016 at 9am. There was a soldier near my house calling my uncle’s name — he was threatening to burn our house. Others were crying. We didn’t know war was going to come. He was wearing a coat with a gun.  Soon we couldn’t go out into the garden to dig for food anymore, also getting money was a problem. We faced hunger.    When you’re as hungry as I was, you can think of even dying. To get food my father had to sell all his cows. But even that wasn’t enough to feed a family as big as mine.  Eventually, my father sent me to Uganda. I came with my younger sister Jeanette and brother Daniel. We got a vehicle, we closed all the windows and came slowly. There were vehicles set on fire and burning and we had to keep quiet, I was panicking all along the way. At last, when we passed the river I heard our driver say “thank god we are now alive. We have reached safety— Nimule.” I had never heard of the place before.  We were stuck for two weeks in the reception centre — it was packed — food and water was a problem. As soon as I came to Bidibidi, WFP gave us beans, maize, oil and we felt better. I got pregnant a few months later, and had to leave school to have Godfrey. I will go back and get an education once he is crawling and my mother can take care of him.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Bidibidi, 20 June 2018  In May this year the UN Security Council passed a resolution that acknowledges the link between hunger and conflict. Karina, one of WFP’s newly trained Storytellers in Bidibidi, Uganda, tells us why peace in South Sudan is the only solution to hunger.  In the Photo: (sitting) Mamcy Karina, aged 19, from Lutoko has eight brothers and sisters and a seven-month old son.  “The war finally came to us on a day in July 2016 at 9am. There was a soldier near my house calling my uncle’s name — he was threatening to burn our house. Others were crying. We didn’t know war was going to come. He was wearing a coat with a gun.  Soon we couldn’t go out into the garden to dig for food anymore, also getting money was a problem. We faced hunger.    When you’re as hungry as I was, you can think of even dying. To get food my father had to sell all his cows. But even that wasn’t enough to feed a family as big as mine.  Eventually, my father sent me to Uganda. I came with my younger sister Jeanette and brother Daniel. We got a vehicle, we closed all the windows and came slowly. There were vehicles set on fire and burning and we had to keep quiet, I was panicking all along the way. At last, when we passed the river I heard our driver say “thank god we are now alive. We have reached safety— Nimule.” I had never heard of the place before.  We were stuck for two weeks in the reception centre — it was packed — food and water was a problem. As soon as I came to Bidibidi, WFP gave us beans, maize, oil and we felt better. I got pregnant a few months later, and had to leave school to have Godfrey. I will go back and get an education once he is crawling and my mother can take care of him.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Kapuat Primary School, Iriiri sub-county, Napak District, 11 April 2018   School children in areas where food security, nutrition and education indicators are low receive one nutritious meal per day from WFP or the Government. WFP also works with the ministries of education, agriculture and finance to establish a national school feeding policy and a sustainable school meals programme which includes the purchase of ingredients from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: a woman shows WFP food used to prepare school meals in the Kapuat Primary School in Iriiri sub-county, Napak district.  
Photo: WFP/Davinah Nabirye
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Uganda, Kapuat Primary School, Iriiri sub-county, Napak District, 11 April 2018   School children in areas where food security, nutrition and education indicators are low receive one nutritious meal per day from WFP or the Government. WFP also works with the ministries of education, agriculture and finance to establish a national school feeding policy and a sustainable school meals programme which includes the purchase of ingredients from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: a woman shows WFP food used to prepare school meals in the Kapuat Primary School in Iriiri sub-county, Napak district.  
Photo: WFP/Davinah Nabirye
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Uganda, Kapuat Primary School, Iriiri sub-county, Napak District, 11 April 2018   School children in areas where food security, nutrition and education indicators are low receive one nutritious meal per day from WFP or the Government. WFP also works with the ministries of education, agriculture and finance to establish a national school feeding policy and a sustainable school meals programme which includes the purchase of ingredients from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: a woman shows WFP food used to prepare school meals in the Kapuat Primary School in Iriiri sub-county, Napak district.  
Photo: WFP/Davinah Nabirye
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Uganda, Kapuat Primary School, Iriiri sub-county, Napak District, 11 April 2018   School children in areas where food security, nutrition and education indicators are low receive one nutritious meal per day from WFP or the Government. WFP also works with the ministries of education, agriculture and finance to establish a national school feeding policy and a sustainable school meals programme which includes the purchase of ingredients from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: two women show WFP food used to prepare school meals in the Kapuat Primary School in Iriiri sub-county, Napak district.  
Photo: WFP/Davinah Nabirye
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