Loading
  • Archives
  • Views
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

"(IPTC101 contains(zimbabwe))": 544 results 

 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  Tired woman and child.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
ZIM_20160908_W....JPG
5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 12645.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  School kids.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
ZIM_20160908_W....JPG
5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 7909.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  WFP Food for Work project building a dam for water retention in El Niño drought stricken area.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
ZIM_20160908_W....JPG
5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 8861.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe eating a meal at her home near Bulawayo in Zimbabwe  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7016.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5775.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4826.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4922.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6159.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Bulawayo, 07 September 2016  Women at a WFP food distribution in El Niño drought stricken area.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 8926.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa District, 23 March 2016  Under nutrition rates are high across Zimbabwe, especially in rural districts where diets lack diversity and are poor in essential nutrients. By increasing access to low-cost foods fortified with essential micronutrients, WFP aims to improve the diets of children in prioritized districts throughout the country.   In the photo: at a food distribution in Mtasa, a boy receives packets of super cereal plus.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Machena
ZIM_20160323_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7407.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa District, 23 March 2016  Under nutrition rates are high across Zimbabwe, especially in rural districts where diets lack diversity and are poor in essential nutrients. By increasing access to low-cost foods fortified with essential micronutrients, WFP aims to improve the diets of children in prioritized districts throughout the country.   In the photo: at a food distribution in Mtasa, a boy receives a bag of fortified flour.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Machena
ZIM_20160322_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6968.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa District, 23 March 2016  Under nutrition rates are high across Zimbabwe, especially in rural districts where diets lack diversity and are poor in essential nutrients. By increasing access to low-cost foods fortified with essential micronutrients, WFP aims to improve the diets of children in prioritized districts throughout the country.   In the photo: at a food distribution in Mtasa, a young school student receives a bag of fortified flour.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Machena
ZIM_20160322_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5827.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa District, 23 March 2016  Under nutrition rates are high across Zimbabwe, especially in rural districts where diets lack diversity and are poor in essential nutrients. By increasing access to low-cost foods fortified with essential micronutrients, WFP aims to improve the diets of children in prioritized districts throughout the country.   In the photo: at a food distribution in Mtasa, children receive bags of fortified flour.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Machena
ZIM_20160322_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4857.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Dinde garden in Makwonda reveals the fruits of continued community efforts to make the most of available resources. Last year, the garden was expanded by some 150 workers, who received food assistance for their entire households in exchange for their labour on the garden between June and November 2015 as part of WFP’s Productive Assets Creation programme.  Through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets such as gardens or small irrigation schemes, the programme aims to promote early recovery, reduce disaster risk, and increase the capacity of communities to manage shocks and meet their food and nutrition needs.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
3264 x 4928 px 27.64 x 41.72 cm 7667.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Dinde garden in Makwonda reveals the fruits of continued community efforts to make the most of available resources. Last year, the garden was expanded by some 150 workers, who received food assistance for their entire households in exchange for their labour on the garden between June and November 2015 as part of WFP’s Productive Assets Creation programme.  Through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets such as gardens or small irrigation schemes, the programme aims to promote early recovery, reduce disaster risk, and increase the capacity of communities to manage shocks and meet their food and nutrition needs.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 9036.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Dinde garden in Makwonda reveals the fruits of continued community efforts to make the most of available resources. Last year, the garden was expanded by some 150 workers, who received food assistance for their entire households in exchange for their labour on the garden between June and November 2015 as part of WFP’s Productive Assets Creation programme.  Through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets such as gardens or small irrigation schemes, the programme aims to promote early recovery, reduce disaster risk, and increase the capacity of communities to manage shocks and meet their food and nutrition needs.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7635.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Dinde garden in Makwonda reveals the fruits of continued community efforts to make the most of available resources. Last year, the garden was expanded by some 150 workers, who received food assistance for their entire households in exchange for their labour on the garden between June and November 2015 as part of WFP’s Productive Assets Creation programme.  Through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets such as gardens or small irrigation schemes, the programme aims to promote early recovery, reduce disaster risk, and increase the capacity of communities to manage shocks and meet their food and nutrition needs.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
3264 x 4928 px 27.64 x 41.72 cm 7750.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Dinde garden in Makwonda reveals the fruits of continued community efforts to make the most of available resources. Last year, the garden was expanded by some 150 workers, who received food assistance for their entire households in exchange for their labour on the garden between June and November 2015 as part of WFP’s Productive Assets Creation programme.  Through the rehabilitation or creation of community assets such as gardens or small irrigation schemes, the programme aims to promote early recovery, reduce disaster risk, and increase the capacity of communities to manage shocks and meet their food and nutrition needs.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 8509.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  In the Photo: the cracking dam bed at Chentale Dam. The dam was created or rehabilitated through WFP’s Productive Asset Creation programme projects in Hwange, and had served as key sources of water for the community.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7761.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Charles Muzamba, a beneficiary of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance in Hwange district, grinding the sorghum grain just received from a distribution of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance, thanks to a donation from the U.S. government.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7023.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Charles Muzamba is a beneficiary of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance in Hwange district, grinding the sorghum grain just received from a distribution of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance, thanks to a donation from the U.S. government.  In the Photo: Charles Muzamba’s wife, Faris Munsaka carrying a bag of sorghum received from WFP. The family of eight has received monthly rations of sorghum, pulses and vegetable oil as part of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance since September.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6962.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Charles Muzamba, a beneficiary of WFP’s Lean Season Assistance in Hwange district, stands in front of his empty field that should have crops at least a meter high by this time in the season.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 1770.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  After receiving their registration cards, these beneficiaries attenda WFP Lean Season Assistance distribution in Lambo distribution point in Hwange district. World Vision, WFP’s cooperating partner for distributions in Hwange, electronically register the beneficiaries.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4641 x 2988 px 39.29 x 25.30 cm 2129.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Beneficiaries receiving their registration cards prior to a WFP Lean Season Assistance distribution in Lambo distribution point in Hwange district. World Vision, WFP’s cooperating partner for distributions in Hwange, electronically register the beneficiaries.   Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7420.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Hwange district, 20 January 2016  Nothando Muleya received her registration card prior to a WFP Lean Season Assistance distribution in Lambo distribution point in Hwange district. World Vision, WFP’s cooperating partner for distributions in Hwange, electronically register the beneficiaries.  Photo: WFP/Sophia Robele
ZIM_20160120_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6928.00 kb

Copyright © World Food Programme 2005-2017. All rights reserved.