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"(IPTC101 contains(zimbabwe))": 563 results 

 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province, 20 December 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6267.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province, 20 December 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6170.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province, 20 December 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5602.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa, 28 November 2017  WFP aims to enable smallholder farmers to have increased access to well-functioning markets by 2030 through activities that address the lack of systems and institutions to support efficient and profitable marketing.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5098.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: a boy attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5594.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: a girl attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6370.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: Children attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7181.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: Children attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6891.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: Children attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7267.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: Children attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6773.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, Midlands Province. 7 August 2017  Zimbabwe is a landlocked, low-income, food deficit country in Southern Africa. At the peak of the 2017 lean season, 4.1 million people were estimated to be food-insecure because of the El Niño-induced drought.  The World Food Programme (WFP), through the Primary and Secondary Education ministry, launched a water source in more than 21 schools in Zvishavane with the aim to support the home grown school feeding programme.  In the Photo: Children attending school in Zvishavane, Zimbabwe.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6506.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa, 19 July 2017  WFP is supporting more than 7000 children in Zimbabwe reap the long-term benefits of a healthy start to life. WFP is working with existing Ministry of Health structures, such as village health workers and UNICEF, to address health and nutrition issues in Zimbabwe. The provision of fortified blended food by WFP to all children between 6–23 months regardless of nutritional status involves malnutrition screening, the administration of vitamin A, and follow-ups on immunizations and on those who might have dropped out from the vitamin A programme. This allows for a dual-track approach to both prevent stunting and treat malnutrition in young children.  Caregivers and mothers visit the health centers, where UNICEF supports the treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) through provision of Ready to Use Therapeutic Food-RUTF, which is supplied through the Government Ministry of Health. This support is extended to all Government health facilities and resources at community level, and provides micronutrient supplements to children and women of child bearing age. WFP works in counterpart to the SAM treatment by providing fortified blended food to children with Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM).  In the Photo: two of the 7018 children WFP Zimbabwe is supporting in Mtasa to achieve ZeroHunger.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7399.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province. 5 July 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5074.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province. 5 July 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4827.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital, Harare, Manicaland Province. 5 July 2017.  WFP is supporting efforts to reduce stunting rates of children in prioritized districts by 2025, in line with national and global targets. The goal is to improve the diets of young children to increase access to low-cost fortified foods, reduce stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among children aged from 6 months to 2 years, and optimize the Government’s nutrition programming.  In the Photo: WFP is supporting nutrition recovery for more than 3000 malnourished children in the country.   Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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3264 x 4928 px 27.64 x 41.72 cm 7914.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mtasa, 15 January 2017  WFP aims to enable smallholder farmers to have increased access to well-functioning markets by 2030 through activities that address the lack of systems and institutions to support efficient and profitable marketing.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12624.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Mudzi Rushinga. 12 January 2017  Between 2014 and 2016, El Niño weather patterns brought drought to south-eastern regions of Africa, slashing the production of staple cereals for the 2015/16 agricultural season.   The World Food Programme (WFP) is using a small grain pilot project to fight hunger and reduce future shocks by transforming communities from vulnerable to resilient. The Small grains project is aligned to Sustainable Development Goal 2 of Ending hunger, achieve food security and improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.  In the Photo: Christine Mabika, a small holder farmer from Rushinga, was a lead farmer in the Small grains project initiated by The World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Tatenda Macheka
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4962.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  Tired woman and child.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  School kids.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 7909.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, Zvishavane, 07 September 2016  WFP Food for Work project building a dam for water retention in El Niño drought stricken area.  Photos: WFP/Jonathan Dumont
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5670 x 3189 px 48.01 x 27.00 cm 8861.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe eating a meal at her home near Bulawayo in Zimbabwe  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7016.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5775.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4826.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 4922.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 6159.00 kb

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