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South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 07 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: Nyabany Mun Roah, 43 years old prepares a meal for her four children outside her family hut in Karam, Uror county. “At the moment my family depend of WFP support. We lost what we planted because of the drought.”   Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15443.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 07 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: Nyabany Mun Roah, 43 years old prepares a meal for her four children outside her family hut in Karam, Uror county. “At the moment my family depend of WFP support. We lost what we planted because of the drought.”   Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15443.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 06 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: Food is served! Nyawany Nyout’s family enjoy a family meal made out of sorghum and milk called “Walwal” in local Nuer language. “This food is reducing our challenges, is vital for our family.” “Before WFP support life was harder, people was depending of wild food. We were starving, there was no enough food.”   Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 24821.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 06 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: Nyawany Mayian Nyout (21), prepares family breakfast inside her family hut in Karam, Uror county. The meal will be shared by the whole family.    “Before we had nothing. Now we are able to feed our children. We are not hungry anymore.” WFP is distributing food assistance to help families like Nyawany’s to tide the tough times.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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5932 x 3955 px 50.22 x 33.49 cm 21414.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: food distribution in Pieri, Uror county. In Pieri, WFP is assisting 29,000 people, of whom 6.600 are children under five years  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 16730.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: food distribution in Pieri, Uror county. In Pieri, WFP is assisting 29,000 people, of whom 6.600 are children under five years  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6466 x 4311 px 54.75 x 36.50 cm 14281.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Pieri, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: food distribution in Pieri, Uror county. In Pieri, WFP is assisting 29,000 people, of whom 6.600 are children under five years  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 17346.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Karam, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: porters contracted by WFP’s partner, Oxfam offloading WFP commodities bags in Karam, Uror county. Porters receive a wage (based on the quantity of bags offloaded) injecting the much-needed cash into rural economies.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 18084.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Karam, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: porters contracted by WFP’s partner, Oxfam offloading WFP commodities bags in Karam, Uror county. Porters receive a wage (based on the quantity of bags offloaded) injecting the much-needed cash into rural economies.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6115 x 4076 px 51.77 x 34.51 cm 15328.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Karam, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: porters contracted by WFP’s partner, Oxfam offloading WFP commodities bags in Karam, Uror county. Porters receive a wage (based on the quantity of bags offloaded) injecting the much-needed cash into rural economies.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20190205_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 16806.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Karam, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: porters contracted by WFP’s partner, Oxfam offloading WFP commodities bags in Karam, Uror county. Porters receive a wage (based on the quantity of bags offloaded) injecting the much-needed cash into rural economies.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20190205_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15483.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Karam, Uror County, 05 February 2019  South Sudan’s food security is dire in 2019. Nearly half of South Sudan’s population of 11 million faces severe food shortages between January and March 2019, with 5.2 million people in need.  The number of people in need is expected to increase, with more people likely to struggle to meet their food needs as the country approaches the peak of the hunger season between May and August 2019. In line with its strategy to increase the use of surface transport and reduce over-reliance on costly airdrops, WFP has successfully tested road deliveries to Uror and Nyrol by using 10 WFP fleet trucks. Both locations were previously served by airdrops. Following the success of the tests, commercial trucks are preparing to deliver larger food quantities to those locations.  In the Photo: a view of a food distribution site in Karam, Uror county. In Uror county, WFP is currently assisting 100.000 people under GFD.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6605 x 4404 px 55.92 x 37.29 cm 14796.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 299.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 211.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 375.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 303.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 473.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 449.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 426.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 480.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Dome, Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile State, 04 October 2018  In Dome, a village in Ulang county, Greater Upper Nile, WFP is using the Sobat river -  a water-way off the River Nile - to deliver assistance to some 40,000 hungry people who are otherwise inaccessible by road.     This is the first time since fighting broke out in 2013 that WFP is able to deliver assistance through the channel. Using one barge and 11 boats, WFP plans to transport a total 752 mt of assorted food commodities including sorghum, pulses, vegetable oil and supercereal.  The commodities which are loaded in Renk, sail through Malakal to reach Dome in Ulang county, an average 5 to 7 days’ journey.    Surface transport is more than six times cheaper than air and the Sobat river will be a major alternative route for delivering approximately 6,200 mt of annual food requirements to seven hard-to-reach locations in Ulang and Nyirol counties which traditionally have been supplied by costly airdrops or airfreights.  In the Photo: food distribution in Dome town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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2240 x 1493 px 56.90 x 37.92 cm 788.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14752.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6119 x 4079 px 51.81 x 34.54 cm 12008.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15346.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Malakal, Upper Nile State, 03 August 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 6 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season when food is most scarce before the next harvest. Since 2017, WFP has reopened river deliveries using contracted river badges to transport food into areas in dire need of food assistance but are inaccessible by road such as Malakal.  Each of the barges carries a minimum 1,000 MT of food. It takes an average 10 days for it to sail on the River Nile from Bor, to south of Malakal or half that time if it’s loaded in Renk to the north. Once in Malakal, food is then loaded on trucks and proceed for distribution.  River deliveries such are six times cheaper than airdrops.  In the Photo: a river badge offloading in Malakal town, South Sudan. River badges is one of many ways the World Food Programme is using to cut the cost of delivering food in countries such as South Sudan.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14540.00 kb

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