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"airdrops": 1059 results 

 
South Sudan, Jiech, Ayod County, 02 July 2018  As South Sudan marks seven years of Independence since seceding from the north, the world’s youngest nation remains deeply embroiled in conflict that has resulted in a widespread humanitarian crisis. More than 7 million people could be severely food insecure in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance and access, by the end of the month. While famine was prevented last year, thanks in part to humanitarian assistance, indications are that there could be some populations in catastrophe – just one step away from famine - in a good number of the counties. There is guarded optimism on the peace revitalization talks but recent fighting in former Unity and Jonglei states threatens to worsen the situation further.   Of greatest concern is the former Unity State where armed clashes in Leer, Koch and Mayendit counties have resulted in mass displacements of populations, undermined people’s capacity to cope and feed their families, and curtailed humanitarian access, reducing aid delivery to a bare minimum. These counties were highlighted in the last assessment as being at risk of humanitarian catastrophe in the protracted absence of humanitarian assistance. Recently, Akobo has been affected by active conflict which is likely to contribute to further deterioration of food security situation.   Although there have been allegations of violations to the ceasefire already, we are hopeful that the new agreement will hold and translate into real changes on the ground.  The people of South Sudan need peace to be able to feed their families and rebuild their lives. WFP and the broader humanitarian community are committed to defeating hunger in South Sudan by using every means possible if we have the necessary financial resources, security and safety guarantees to reach those struggling to survive. To push back hunger in South Sudan, WFP requires both sustained access and funding. WFP calls on all parties to the conflict to ensure full and unimpeded access to all people in need. The conflict must end!   Almost everyone in the village of Jiech fled conflict from volatile parts of the country such as Wau, in Western Bahr Gazel and Ayod town in hostile take-overs by Government forces. There are no roads leading into the centre of the ‘payam’ – local lingo denoting a suburb just below the county. The nearest market is a day’s walking by foot. The food security situation is worsening with most people in IPC Phase 4.  In the Photo: A WFP-chartered Illyushin-76 aircraft drops food commodities into Jiech, Ayod county. WFP uses airdrops as a last resort to deliver critical supplies where there are no viable surface transport options.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180702_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 11792.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jiech, Ayod County, 02 July 2018  As South Sudan marks seven years of Independence since seceding from the north, the world’s youngest nation remains deeply embroiled in conflict that has resulted in a widespread humanitarian crisis. More than 7 million people could be severely food insecure in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance and access, by the end of the month. While famine was prevented last year, thanks in part to humanitarian assistance, indications are that there could be some populations in catastrophe – just one step away from famine - in a good number of the counties. There is guarded optimism on the peace revitalization talks but recent fighting in former Unity and Jonglei states threatens to worsen the situation further.   Of greatest concern is the former Unity State where armed clashes in Leer, Koch and Mayendit counties have resulted in mass displacements of populations, undermined people’s capacity to cope and feed their families, and curtailed humanitarian access, reducing aid delivery to a bare minimum. These counties were highlighted in the last assessment as being at risk of humanitarian catastrophe in the protracted absence of humanitarian assistance. Recently, Akobo has been affected by active conflict which is likely to contribute to further deterioration of food security situation.   Although there have been allegations of violations to the ceasefire already, we are hopeful that the new agreement will hold and translate into real changes on the ground.  The people of South Sudan need peace to be able to feed their families and rebuild their lives. WFP and the broader humanitarian community are committed to defeating hunger in South Sudan by using every means possible if we have the necessary financial resources, security and safety guarantees to reach those struggling to survive. To push back hunger in South Sudan, WFP requires both sustained access and funding. WFP calls on all parties to the conflict to ensure full and unimpeded access to all people in need. The conflict must end!   Almost everyone in the village of Jiech fled conflict from volatile parts of the country such as Wau, in Western Bahr Gazel and Ayod town in hostile take-overs by Government forces. There are no roads leading into the centre of the ‘payam’ – local lingo denoting a suburb just below the county. The nearest market is a day’s walking by foot. The food security situation is worsening with most people in IPC Phase 4.  In the Photo: A WFP-chartered Illyushin-76 aircraft drops food commodities into Jiech, Ayod county. WFP uses airdrops as a last resort to deliver critical supplies where there are no viable surface transport options.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180702_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 11066.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jiech, Ayod County, 02 July 2018  As South Sudan marks seven years of Independence since seceding from the north, the world’s youngest nation remains deeply embroiled in conflict that has resulted in a widespread humanitarian crisis. More than 7 million people could be severely food insecure in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance and access, by the end of the month. While famine was prevented last year, thanks in part to humanitarian assistance, indications are that there could be some populations in catastrophe – just one step away from famine - in a good number of the counties. There is guarded optimism on the peace revitalization talks but recent fighting in former Unity and Jonglei states threatens to worsen the situation further.   Of greatest concern is the former Unity State where armed clashes in Leer, Koch and Mayendit counties have resulted in mass displacements of populations, undermined people’s capacity to cope and feed their families, and curtailed humanitarian access, reducing aid delivery to a bare minimum. These counties were highlighted in the last assessment as being at risk of humanitarian catastrophe in the protracted absence of humanitarian assistance. Recently, Akobo has been affected by active conflict which is likely to contribute to further deterioration of food security situation.   Although there have been allegations of violations to the ceasefire already, we are hopeful that the new agreement will hold and translate into real changes on the ground.  The people of South Sudan need peace to be able to feed their families and rebuild their lives. WFP and the broader humanitarian community are committed to defeating hunger in South Sudan by using every means possible if we have the necessary financial resources, security and safety guarantees to reach those struggling to survive. To push back hunger in South Sudan, WFP requires both sustained access and funding. WFP calls on all parties to the conflict to ensure full and unimpeded access to all people in need. The conflict must end!   Almost everyone in the village of Jiech fled conflict from volatile parts of the country such as Wau, in Western Bahr Gazel and Ayod town in hostile take-overs by Government forces. There are no roads leading into the centre of the ‘payam’ – local lingo denoting a suburb just below the county. The nearest market is a day’s walking by foot. The food security situation is worsening with most people in IPC Phase 4.  In the Photo: A WFP-chartered Illyushin-76 aircraft drops food commodities into Jiech, Ayod county. WFP uses airdrops as a last resort to deliver critical supplies where there are no viable surface transport options.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180702_W....JPG
4255 x 2837 px 36.03 x 24.02 cm 7359.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jiech, Ayod County, 02 July 2018  As South Sudan marks seven years of Independence since seceding from the north, the world’s youngest nation remains deeply embroiled in conflict that has resulted in a widespread humanitarian crisis. More than 7 million people could be severely food insecure in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance and access, by the end of the month. While famine was prevented last year, thanks in part to humanitarian assistance, indications are that there could be some populations in catastrophe – just one step away from famine - in a good number of the counties. There is guarded optimism on the peace revitalization talks but recent fighting in former Unity and Jonglei states threatens to worsen the situation further.   Of greatest concern is the former Unity State where armed clashes in Leer, Koch and Mayendit counties have resulted in mass displacements of populations, undermined people’s capacity to cope and feed their families, and curtailed humanitarian access, reducing aid delivery to a bare minimum. These counties were highlighted in the last assessment as being at risk of humanitarian catastrophe in the protracted absence of humanitarian assistance. Recently, Akobo has been affected by active conflict which is likely to contribute to further deterioration of food security situation.   Although there have been allegations of violations to the ceasefire already, we are hopeful that the new agreement will hold and translate into real changes on the ground.  The people of South Sudan need peace to be able to feed their families and rebuild their lives. WFP and the broader humanitarian community are committed to defeating hunger in South Sudan by using every means possible if we have the necessary financial resources, security and safety guarantees to reach those struggling to survive. To push back hunger in South Sudan, WFP requires both sustained access and funding. WFP calls on all parties to the conflict to ensure full and unimpeded access to all people in need. The conflict must end!   Almost everyone in the village of Jiech fled conflict from volatile parts of the country such as Wau, in Western Bahr Gazel and Ayod town in hostile take-overs by Government forces. There are no roads leading into the centre of the ‘payam’ – local lingo denoting a suburb just below the county. The nearest market is a day’s walking by foot. The food security situation is worsening with most people in IPC Phase 4.  In the Photo: porters contracted by WFP’s partner, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) carry a bag of cereals to a nearby stack in preparation of a food distribution. Once airdrops have been completed, staff from CRS and WFP distribute food to the community. WFP provides cereals, oulses and vegetable oil for the household and nutrition supplements for pregnant and nursing women and children under five years.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180702_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 16765.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jiech, Ayod County, 02 July 2018  As South Sudan marks seven years of Independence since seceding from the north, the world’s youngest nation remains deeply embroiled in conflict that has resulted in a widespread humanitarian crisis. More than 7 million people could be severely food insecure in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance and access, by the end of the month. While famine was prevented last year, thanks in part to humanitarian assistance, indications are that there could be some populations in catastrophe – just one step away from famine - in a good number of the counties. There is guarded optimism on the peace revitalization talks but recent fighting in former Unity and Jonglei states threatens to worsen the situation further.   Of greatest concern is the former Unity State where armed clashes in Leer, Koch and Mayendit counties have resulted in mass displacements of populations, undermined people’s capacity to cope and feed their families, and curtailed humanitarian access, reducing aid delivery to a bare minimum. These counties were highlighted in the last assessment as being at risk of humanitarian catastrophe in the protracted absence of humanitarian assistance. Recently, Akobo has been affected by active conflict which is likely to contribute to further deterioration of food security situation.   Although there have been allegations of violations to the ceasefire already, we are hopeful that the new agreement will hold and translate into real changes on the ground.  The people of South Sudan need peace to be able to feed their families and rebuild their lives. WFP and the broader humanitarian community are committed to defeating hunger in South Sudan by using every means possible if we have the necessary financial resources, security and safety guarantees to reach those struggling to survive. To push back hunger in South Sudan, WFP requires both sustained access and funding. WFP calls on all parties to the conflict to ensure full and unimpeded access to all people in need. The conflict must end!   Almost everyone in the village of Jiech fled conflict from volatile parts of the country such as Wau, in Western Bahr Gazel and Ayod town in hostile take-overs by Government forces. There are no roads leading into the centre of the ‘payam’ – local lingo denoting a suburb just below the county. The nearest market is a day’s walking by foot. The food security situation is worsening with most people in IPC Phase 4.  In the Photo: A WFP-chartered Illyushin-76 aircraft drops food commodities into Jiech, Ayod county. WFP uses airdrops as a last resort to deliver critical supplies where there are no viable surface transport options.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180702_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14518.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3804.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4220.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4642.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4918.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4743.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3864.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4317.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3748.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3586.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3512.00 kb
 
Syria, Deir Ezzor (Deir ez-Zor), 14 February 2018  After five years of continuous fighting and three years of siege, 80 percent of Deir Ezzor city lies in ruins. Families who return can only live in the remaining overcrowded neighbourhoods of Qusoor, Joura, Jbeila and the less destroyed parts of two other areas. Rent has skyrocketed reaching more than $100 a month, forcing families to move in with others to split costs. During the second part of the siege, the World Food Programme (WFP) ran an airdrop operation, to deliver lifesaving food assistance to feed nearly 100,000 people including Ali and his family who were trapped in the city. When the siege was finally lifted, WFP had conducted 309 airdrops.  In the Photo: a decimated street in the eastern Syrian city of Deir Ezzor, Syria.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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3456 x 4608 px 29.26 x 39.01 cm 3336.00 kb
 
Syria, Deir Ezzor (Deir ez-Zor), 14 February 2018  After five years of continuous fighting and three years of siege, 80 percent of Deir Ezzor city lies in ruins. Families who return can only live in the remaining overcrowded neighbourhoods of Qusoor, Joura, Jbeila and the less destroyed parts of two other areas. Rent has skyrocketed reaching more than $100 a month, forcing families to move in with others to split costs. During the second part of the siege, the World Food Programme (WFP) ran an airdrop operation, to deliver lifesaving food assistance to feed nearly 100,000 people including Ali and his family who were trapped in the city. When the siege was finally lifted, WFP had conducted 309 airdrops.  In the Photo: a decimated street in the eastern Syrian city of Deir Ezzor, Syria.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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4608 x 3456 px 39.01 x 29.26 cm 3409.00 kb
 
Syria, Deir Ezzor (Deir ez-Zor), 14 February 2018  After five years of continuous fighting and three years of siege, 80 percent of Deir Ezzor city lies in ruins. Families who return can only live in the remaining overcrowded neighbourhoods of Qusoor, Joura, Jbeila and the less destroyed parts of two other areas. Rent has skyrocketed reaching more than $100 a month, forcing families to move in with others to split costs. During the second part of the siege, the World Food Programme (WFP) ran an airdrop operation, to deliver lifesaving food assistance to feed nearly 100,000 people including Ali and his family who were trapped in the city. When the siege was finally lifted, WFP had conducted 309 airdrops.  In the Photo: a decimated street in the eastern Syrian city of Deir Ezzor, Syria.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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4608 x 3456 px 39.01 x 29.26 cm 3341.00 kb

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