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"climate change": 3828 results 

 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5481 x 3654 px 46.41 x 30.94 cm 2472.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5737 x 3825 px 48.57 x 32.38 cm 2391.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2425.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2979.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5751 x 3834 px 48.69 x 32.46 cm 2999.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: a R4 participant, digging swales to trap water and retain moisture in her field. In exchange of this labour, she benefits from insurance for drought.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5200 x 3467 px 44.03 x 29.35 cm 2854.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 2543.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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4813 x 3209 px 40.75 x 27.17 cm 2287.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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4087 x 2725 px 34.60 x 23.07 cm 2074.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180426_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2729.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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2778 x 4000 px 23.52 x 33.87 cm 2585.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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3228 x 2152 px 27.33 x 18.22 cm 2340.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 26 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Petros Malunga, 29, lives in Masaka. He was one of the first smallholder farmers to join the R4 Initiative. “Last year, I harvested twelve bags of maize, but this year I’m expecting only four bags. Elders in the village talk about how dry spells have became more intense and frequent. With my payout, I’m going to buy seeds and work on my garden which will bring me some benefits and help me get through the year.” he said, whilst digging a trench in a field he irrigated, destined to be planted with sweet potatoes.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180426_W....JPG
5030 x 3353 px 42.59 x 28.39 cm 2966.00 kb
 
Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: Cathreen Thomas's daughter preparing maize before bagging. “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Masaka, 25 April 2018.   “This season in Malawi, more than 7,000 drought-affected families will receive an insurance pay-out valued at around US$ 400,000. This is the first time that a weather index insurance programme has delivered payouts at such a large scale in Malawi,” said Benoit Thiry, Country Director for WFP Malawi. “Given the impacts of climate change, weather insurance, a key element which complements other initiatives being undertaken to make people more resilient to weather-related shocks, needs to grow in Malawi.”  Using a wide range of interventions and an integrated approach, including village saving and loans as well as micro-credit, WFP’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative has broken new ground in climate risk management by enabling the poorest farmers to pay for drought insurance with their labour, while developing their capacity to pay for it with cash. The insurance is index based, meaning satellites are used to monitor rainfall and payouts are triggered automatically if rainfall is below pre-agreed amounts. Farmers are actively participating to develop a tailored product and greater understanding of insurance. They also collect records on rainfall levels to help track the likelihood of a payout.  The success of the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative wouldn’t be possible without multi-stakeholder partnerships. WFP is implementing R4 in partnership with local stakeholders and the government supported by funding from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Government of Flanders International Cooperation Agency and DFID (United Kingdom).   In the Photo: “I had never heard about weather insurance. I only knew about vehicle insurance,” said Cathreen Thomas, a smallholder farmer living in Masaka, south of Malawi. “Last year, I harvested ten bags of maize, but this year, it did not rain for twenty five days during the rainy season so I am only expecting to harvest two bags of maize this year,” she added.  However earlier this year, Cathreen insured her crops against drought through the UN World Food Programme’s (WFP) and Oxfam America’s R4 Rural Resilience Initiative and received a payout of 38,000 Malawi Kwacha (US$ 55) as a compensation for the dry spells she experienced. “It’s a relief for my family. I am planning to use the payout to buy seeds which I will plant in my newly irrigated fields.”  One of the innovations under the R4 initiative is that poor farmers, like Cathreen, can pay for weather-index insurance through their labour. This means that a farmer has access to insurance by providing up to fourteen days of work within a period of two months. Farmers are required to create assets that contribute to improving their capacity to resist weather shocks, like irrigation systems.  “What I am very happy about is that I benefitted from crop insurance by digging swales. Because I dug these swales, my fields are moist from trapping water, Soon, I will be planting seeds for my next crop.” said Cathreen.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 28 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary.  Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: pupils of the Sinthiou Mogo school having their lunch.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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Senegal, Sinthiou Mogo (Matam), 28 February 2018  Diary Sy goes to school near Matam, located more than 600 km from Senegal’s capital Dakar, in a region plagued by poverty and illiteracy. Only one in four people can read — with girls being particularly disadvantaged and more likely to drop out of school or forced into early marriage. Fortunately, at her school in Sinthiou Mogo in the outskirts of Matam, as in the other 750 primary schools benefiting from the World Food Programme’s (WFP) cash-based transfers in support of school canteens, girls are encouraged to take on leadership positions Diary is one of the student leaders. “My role as Communication Minister is to inform students about decisions made by our government, which we must all respect to live well in school,” says Diary. Despite her young age, Diary takes her ministerial role very seriously. The hygiene and cleanliness of students, the maintenance of classrooms and other school areas are issues on the agenda of their government, which represents the interests of 350 students between 6 and 14 years of age.  The 10-year-old Diary dreams of a great career but not in communication. “I would like to become a doctor when I grow up because I have noticed that sometimes doctors refuse to treat the poor children in the village because they have no money.”  In the area around Matam, like in many parts of the Sahel, the effect of climate change, erratic rainfall and failed crops have resulted in chronically high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Diary says she is very lucky to go to school and enjoy a hot meal at noon. She says she feels sad when she sees children her age forced to beg for food. “These children should not be on the street,” says the young minister. “Their place is at home with their parents who must also enroll them in school. All children should go to school to be well educated and have a good life,” she adds emphatically. Diary is not the only girl in the school government. The school government at present counts seven girls and six boys under the direction of their female ‘head of state’ President Fatou Diop.  In the school canteen, girls and boys divide the tasks, without considering social norms that dictate that only girls should serve meals and do the dishes. “We want to live in an environment where every student contributes to making our school a clean, healthy, peaceful and enjoyable place. I am pleased to be the President of our school (government) and we thank WFP for supporting the canteen,” declares President Diop.  In the Photo: Diary Sy poses in her classroom.  Photo: WFP/Paulele Fall
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