Loading
  • Archives
  • Views
  • Tools
Layout
Show:
Save

"climate change": 3875 results 

 
Niger, Dargué, Maradi, 16 August 2018  RBA UN Agencies (FAO, WFP and IFAD) along with the Government of Niger and other partners visited the agropastoral Maradi region of Niger to understand the context and local priorities, especially the needs of women and other vulnerable groups in the area. In Niger, as in many other parts of the Sahel, climate shocks have resulted in recurring droughts with devastating impacts on the region's already vulnerable populations.  In the Photo: tthree UN agency heads visiting some stands representing complementary nutrition activities through woman empowerment and climate change in Dargué in the Maradi region of Niger on August 16, 2018.  Photo: FAO/IFAD/WFP/Luis Tato
NER_20180816_F....JPG
4000 x 2666 px 33.87 x 22.57 cm 3231.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: Irrigation ditches like this one in El Salvador allow rural communities to manage water in the Dry Corridor.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 11099.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: one of the fruits that Marina cultivates in her family garden.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10585.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: one of the fruits that Marina cultivates in her family garden.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10733.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: Marina Claro shows her favorite meal with tortillas. Both are delicious and nutritious.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 12364.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: Marina Claro's kitchen: the lemonade contains 12 lemons, peppermint, and sugar.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 12045.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: Marina Claro shows her favorite meal with tortillas. Both are delicious and nutritious. These corn tortillas are made with chipilín, berries and carrot, but they can also be made with beets.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 12282.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: Marina Claro shows her favorite meal. Both are delicious and nutritious. This bean salad also includes diced tomatoes, chile, onion, green leaves and lemons.   Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10871.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  Marina Claros’ family is preparing a healthy lunch, with plenty of vegetables and no oil. Her sister-in-law, Armida, is making corn and carrot tortillas while her uncle Maximiliano busies himself with a pitcher of peppermint lemonade.  Set out on the kitchen table is Marina’s favorite salad — beans, chopped tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, greens and lemon — which she and her family just finished making together. “It’s easy, quick to make, and nutritious,” says Marina.  She learned the recipe at a community cooking class in Masala, in the Salvadoran department of Morazán.  A nutritionist taught her, Maximiliano and other participants to avoid using stock to add flavour to their dishes and to start using leafy greens, which they had not thought about despite having them readily at hand. “We value them now because green leaves contain quite a lot of iron that, for instance, can help combat anaemia in children,” says Marina.  A mother of four, Marina grows chipilín — a local leafy green — blackberries, cilantro, maidenhair and other herbs in her family garden. She also grows a variety of fruits and vegetables that help diversify her diet, save money at the market and generate some extra income when she can sell the surplus. To do this in such a drought-stricken area, she has an irrigation system in her yard that also harvests water.  “They have suffered from continuous droughts here,” remarks Luis Bran, coordinator for the World Food Programme (WFP)’s project for resilience against climate change in El Salvador “and families are making a big effort.”  In the Photo: Arminda García  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 12387.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: trees help fight climate change, preventing soil erosion and lowering temperatures, among other benefits.   Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 13741.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 29 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  Esperanza Vigil began to notice changes in the climate four years ago, the last time her community had a normal winter. Since then, the blooming times of the trees have changed and storms have become more common in the municipality of Joateca, in the department of Morazán, El Salvador. “You can tell the weather has lost its usual balance,” she says: “It’s like it is all distorted.”  In the Photo: Like many members of her community, Esperanza Vigil has learned to take care of the environment.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180529_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 11724.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Have you noticed how sweaty I am?” says Marielos Segovia, as she traces the lines of her cheeks with her fingers. “In the past, the climate didn’t feel like this in the area. It was cooler.”  Marielos, a 24-year-old from the eastern part of the department of Usulután, explains that “the younger ones, especially the children, are noticing the changes and they say that it’s too hot.”  The municipality of San Francisco Javier, where Marielos lives, has high poverty rates and the people’s main concern is putting food on the table. They grow maize and beans, and use chemical fertilizers. As head of the Environment Unit at the municipality, Marielos’ job is to raise awareness among the community. “This is a job that we all have to do together, because we are already experiencing the changes in the climate.”  In the Photo: Marielos Segovia is very committed to the environment and her community in Usulután.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180528_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 7312.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Usulután, 28 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: irrigation ditches are a couple of activities that allow rural communities in El Salvador to mitigate the impact of climate change.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
ELS_20180528_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10807.00 kb
 
Honduras, 25 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: Maize is a staple in the Central American diet. In this home in Honduras, it is stored inside for their consumption.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180525_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 7328.00 kb
 
Honduras, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: This micro basin in Honduras´ Dry Corridor was much smaller a few years ago, mainly due to deforestation.  The Dry Corridor is not a desert, but is prone to droughts that are sometimes severe. This is why it´s important to manage rainwater.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180524_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 6122.00 kb
 
Honduras, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: This micro basin in Honduras´ Dry Corridor was much smaller a few years ago, mainly due to deforestation.  The Dry Corridor is not a desert, but is prone to droughts that are sometimes severe. This is why it´s important to manage rainwater.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180524_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 6464.00 kb
 
Honduras, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: This micro basin in Honduras´ Dry Corridor was much smaller a few years ago, mainly due to deforestation.  The Dry Corridor is not a desert, but is prone to droughts that are sometimes severe. This is why it´s important to manage rainwater.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180524_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 10427.00 kb
 
Honduras, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: Fertilizing plants in a community nursery.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180524_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 4594.00 kb
 
Honduras, 24 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  In the Photo: Fertilizing pine trees in a community nursery.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180524_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 5662.00 kb
 
Honduras, 22 May 2018  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 4483.00 kb
 
Honduras, El Santuario, Choluteca department, 22 May 2018  Locally-produced eggs help communities fight poverty and the effects of climate change  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Our life is better now, you can tell from the happiness on our faces,” says Raquel Martínez in front of the poultry barn her community manages in El Santuario, in the Choluteca department of Honduras.  The poultry barn is part of a wider sustainable development project, alongside a community garden, agroforestry plots, water harvesting systems and a rural bank. In total, 81 people are involved in the project.  Pablo Carranza, treasurer of the rural bank, mentions that they also sell four trays a week to other communities. “The eggs sell really well. They are good and people love them,” he says. The goal is to expand the poultry barn and sell to even more communities.  In the Photo: Pablo Carranza organizes the eggs from the community poultry barn to be sold in the local shop.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 5531.00 kb
 
Honduras, El Santuario, Choluteca department, 22 May 2018  Locally-produced eggs help communities fight poverty and the effects of climate change  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Our life is better now, you can tell from the happiness on our faces,” says Raquel Martínez in front of the poultry barn her community manages in El Santuario, in the Choluteca department of Honduras.  The poultry barn is part of a wider sustainable development project, alongside a community garden, agroforestry plots, water harvesting systems and a rural bank. In total, 81 people are involved in the project.  Pablo Carranza, treasurer of the rural bank, mentions that they also sell four trays a week to other communities. “The eggs sell really well. They are good and people love them,” he says. The goal is to expand the poultry barn and sell to even more communities.  In the Photo: Pablo Carranza organizes the eggs from the community poultry barn to be sold in the local shop.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 5811.00 kb
 
Honduras, El Santuario, Choluteca department, 22 May 2018  Locally-produced eggs help communities fight poverty and the effects of climate change  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Our life is better now, you can tell from the happiness on our faces,” says Raquel Martínez in front of the poultry barn her community manages in El Santuario, in the Choluteca department of Honduras.  The poultry barn is part of a wider sustainable development project, alongside a community garden, agroforestry plots, water harvesting systems and a rural bank. In total, 81 people are involved in the project.  Pablo Carranza, treasurer of the rural bank, mentions that they also sell four trays a week to other communities. “The eggs sell really well. They are good and people love them,” he says. The goal is to expand the poultry barn and sell to even more communities.  In the Photo: project participants feed the laying hens and then collect the eggs in the local barn.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 7032.00 kb
 
Honduras, El Santuario, Choluteca department, 22 May 2018  Locally-produced eggs help communities fight poverty and the effects of climate change  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Our life is better now, you can tell from the happiness on our faces,” says Raquel Martínez in front of the poultry barn her community manages in El Santuario, in the Choluteca department of Honduras.  The poultry barn is part of a wider sustainable development project, alongside a community garden, agroforestry plots, water harvesting systems and a rural bank. In total, 81 people are involved in the project.  Pablo Carranza, treasurer of the rural bank, mentions that they also sell four trays a week to other communities. “The eggs sell really well. They are good and people love them,” he says. The goal is to expand the poultry barn and sell to even more communities.  In the Photo: project participants feed the laying hens and then collect the eggs in the local barn.  Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 6836.00 kb
 
Honduras, El Santuario, Choluteca department, 22 May 2018  Locally-produced eggs help communities fight poverty and the effects of climate change  WFP supports smallholder farmers and agricultural laborers, with a special focus on women, in creating or rehabilitating climate-resilient assets to improve their productivity, income, livelihoods, nutrition and food security.  “Our life is better now, you can tell from the happiness on our faces,” says Raquel Martínez in front of the poultry barn her community manages in El Santuario, in the Choluteca department of Honduras.  The poultry barn is part of a wider sustainable development project, alongside a community garden, agroforestry plots, water harvesting systems and a rural bank. In total, 81 people are involved in the project.  Pablo Carranza, treasurer of the rural bank, mentions that they also sell four trays a week to other communities. “The eggs sell really well. They are good and people love them,” he says. The goal is to expand the poultry barn and sell to even more communities.  In the Photo: the Gómez family, like others in their community, grow a variety of vegetables in their garden.   Photo: WFP/Rocío Franco
HON_20180522_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 63.50 x 42.33 cm 6783.00 kb

Copyright © World Food Programme 2005-2018. All rights reserved.