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"coping strategies": 691 results 

 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used ele
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3056 x 4592 px 22.18 x 33.32 cm 4130.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4913.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4689.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 3985.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used ele
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3056 x 4592 px 22.18 x 33.32 cm 3716.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4498.00 kb
 
Turkey, 29 November 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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4592 x 3056 px 33.32 x 22.18 cm 4753.00 kb
 
Turkey, 3 October 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: 36 year-old Safa (right), a mother of 8 from Syria, fills the ESSN application form with her sister-in-law Dalal at a registration centre in southern Turkey. “My husband spends most of his days collecting paper from garbage bins and sells them to recycling factories, despite having leg pains. He is out in the streets all day trying to make ends meet. This is why we need your help,” she says.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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3872 x 2592 px 32.78 x 21.95 cm 5017.00 kb
 
Turkey, 3 October 2016  Since 2012, WFP has joined forces with the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC) to assist vulnerable Syrian refugees through an electronic food (e-food) card that can be redeemed against nutritious foods in local supermarkets.  Turkey now hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 2.8 million Syrians, 90 percent of whom live in communities. Many of them are resorting to negative coping strategies including debt, reducing the number of meals or not sending children to school. The Government, WFP and other humanitarian responders have been helping these populations, but the needs vastly outweigh the current level of support.  In response, WFP has partnered with ECHO, the Turkish Government and TRC to design and roll-out the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN), the first social assistance scheme of its kind, using direct cash-transfers to cover the everyday needs of the most vulnerable refugee families.  The ESSN will support one million refugees, helping families afford basic necessities such as food, rent, utilities, medicine and warm clothing for winter. Families will be assessed to see if they meet the ESSN criteria, prioritising families led by women and elderly, or with family members living with disability. Families with many dependents, such as children or elderly, will also be prioritised. Each refugee family supported by the ESSN will receive a debit card which can be used in local shops or to withdraw money from ATMs, granting them the freedom to choose what they need and returning a degree of normality and dignity.  Building on the hospitality and generosity of the Turkish people and Government, the programme will promote social cohesion, and positively impact host communities by injecting money into local economies. The ESSN closely aligns with existing national social assistance programmes and works through government welfare centres.   The e-food card programme in Turkey marked the first instance in which WFP has used electronic vouchers at the onset of emergency response. The programme has been highly successful in terms of satisfaction of the people assisted and efficient use of limited resources. People appreciate the flexibility of choosing which nutritious and diverse food to purchase. Overall, 95 percent of the assisted population has an acceptable food consumption score and a high level dietary diversity. Monitoring also shows that 85 percent of women participate in decisions on how to spend the e-food card money and often shop themselves.  Since 2012, WFP has injected USD 206 million into the Turkish economy through the e-cards that are redeemed at local shops. WFP also has a history of large-scale commodity procurement in Turkey to support its operations globally, with USD 1.3 billion worth of commodities procured since 2011. Almost 70 percent of these commodities have been used for emergency food assistance within Syria and the region, including surrounding countries hosting refugees and WFP’s emergency response in Iraq.  In the Photo: the first ESSN cards were distributed in December 2016 and are helping refugee families across Turkey cover their essential needs.  This programme is a partnership between the EU’s humanitarian branch (ECHO), WFP, the Turkish Red Crescent and the Turkish Government and aims to reach 1 million people in need by the second half of 2017.  Photo: WFP/Berna Cetin
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3056 x 4592 px 22.18 x 33.32 cm 2698.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe eating a meal at her home near Bulawayo in Zimbabwe  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 7016.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
ZIM_20160907_W....JPG
4928 x 3264 px 41.72 x 27.64 cm 5775.00 kb
 
Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe taking home food she has purchased with cash from the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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Zimbabwe, 7 September 2016  Unbroken Spirit: HIV and Hunger in Zimbabwe  From her home in a village near Bulawayo — Zimbabwe’s second largest city — Sipiwe Moyo, a smallholder farmer living with HIV, must walk 5 hours to the clinic to get treatment. Sipiwe’s husband died from AIDS in 2004, leaving her and her son. “Because of my health, I have to take medicine and eat twice a day. I feel dizzy, it’s better if I have something in my stomach,” she says. “But this year, I got nothing [in the harvest]. We tried to plant three or four times, but we got no rain.” In Zimbabwe, many of the districts hardest hit by the El Niño-related drought also have the highest rates of HIV in the country. It is estimated that 196,000 people, including children, are living with HIV in the 15 districts worst affected by drought. Many people living with HIV have become more vulnerable after consecutive poor harvests.  Across southern Africa, the impacts of the drought pose a serious challenge to the Global Goal of ending AIDS as an epidemic by 2030. People living with HIV are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity and malnutrition, and there is a direct correlation between food insecurity and treatment adherence, retention and success. “Over the last few months, we have seen increasing rates of malnutrition in various parts of the country due to the El Niño-induced drought,” says Niels Balzer, Head of Programme for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Zimbabwe. “This has also had an impact on people living with HIV/AIDS in that they will not be able to access enough food and nutrients which they need to ensure the drugs they are taking every day have their intended effects.”  Food insecurity can also pressure people into unsustainable or harmful coping strategies, such as transactional sex, which can then drive new HIV infections. A study in 2014 of 18 El Niño-affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, found that infection rates in HIV endemic rural areas increased by 11% with every recent drought. To help vulnerable communities like Sipiwe’s cope with both the drought and HIV, WFP provides food-insecure households with food and cash, as well as nutrition support funded by USAID for prevention of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged under 5. The cash enables people to buy a variety of fresh foods and helps the local economy. When staples such as white maize are not available on the local market, WFP provides food. “This is the first year I am receiving assistance from WFP,” says Sipiwe. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  In the Photo: Sipiwe Moyo is a smallholder farmer living with HIV in a village in Zimbabwe. The El Nino-related drought has destroyed her hopes of growing her own food. But with support from the World Food Programme Sipiwe is smiling again. “At the clinic they tell me that I look a lot better now — I used to be so skinny. I am getting stronger every day.”  Photo: WFP/Fiona Guy
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Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mugunga III refugee camp, 31 May 2015  WFP VAM provides analysis on people’s food security and vulnerability (who, where, how many and why) to WFP and partners for targeted and need-based food assistance.  In February 2014, WFP started remote phone-based data collection and food security monitoring in Mugunga 3 Camp in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo through the mVAM (mobile Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping) approach. Survey respondents are contacted via live calls placed by operators and interactive voice response (IVR). Respondents are asked to respond to a short series of questions on household food consumption and coping strategies used.  In the Photo: a woman from the Mugunga III refugee camp replies to a phone survey from WFP. The operator asks her questions about what she and her children have been eating over the last seven days, and how they have been coping if short of food.  Photo: WFP/Lucia Casarin
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Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mugunga III refugee camp, 31 May 2015  WFP VAM provides analysis on people’s food security and vulnerability (who, where, how many and why) to WFP and partners for targeted and need-based food assistance.  In February 2014, WFP started remote phone-based data collection and food security monitoring in Mugunga 3 Camp in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo through the mVAM (mobile Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping) approach. Survey respondents are contacted via live calls placed by operators and interactive voice response (IVR). Respondents are asked to respond to a short series of questions on household food consumption and coping strategies used.  In the Photo: a woman from the Mugunga III refugee camp replies to a phone survey from WFP. The operator asks her questions about what she and her children have been eating over the last seven days, and how they have been coping if short of food.  Photo: WFP/Lucia Casarin
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Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4088 x 6144 px 34.61 x 52.02 cm 5279.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4088 x 6144 px 34.61 x 52.02 cm 5806.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4088 x 6144 px 34.61 x 52.02 cm 5653.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4088 x 6144 px 34.61 x 52.02 cm 5805.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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6144 x 4088 px 52.02 x 34.61 cm 6095.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Bangladesh, 29 November 2012  Palashbari Upazila, Gaibandah  Bangladesh is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Increased frequency of natural disasters, such as cyclones, floods and drought, is likely to undermine poverty reduction efforts. Coping strategies adopted by the poor such as reducing food intake, withdrawing children from school and selling productive assets increase the vulnerability of low-income households and worsen people’s prospects for escaping the poverty cycle. Despite these numerous challenges, WFP is able to draw on 39 years of operations in the country to continue supporting the Government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. WFP works in close cooperation with the Government and local as well as international NGOs to improve the food security, nutritional well-being and livelihoods of the ultra-poor. WFP also supports communities vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a focus on building community and household preparedness and resilience through innovative food and cash for work and training programmes. The aim of WFP’s Nutrition Strategy in Bangladesh is to support the government in breaking the intergenerational cycle of under nutrition by giving priority to a child’s first 1000 days of life. WFP is actively engaged in the initiatives Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Under nutrition (REACH) and Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) which provide the principal coordination mechanisms. To promote the nutritional status of undernourished children under two, pregnant and nursing women and adolescent girls WFP provides specialized nutritious foods. These distributions are complemented by behavior change communication aimed at improving nutrition and hygiene practices. These sessions are attended by young women and mothers, other caretakers of undernourished children as well as a wider audience of community members.  The EU-WFP cash grant programme, Financial Support for the Ultra Poor (FSUP) targets the ultra poor populations in Bangladesh and the women that participate to the programme receive an opportunity to graduate out of food insecurity. In fact this innovative approach allows women to start businesses and to produce income. Beneficiaries are identified and trained on entrepreneurship models months before they receive the cash grant followed by the monthly subsistence allowance. By applying the knowledge gained from the entrepreneurship training the women are able to invest their cash grants and to produce good profit, which in most cases gets re-invested to expand the family activities. Another added value is that families that successfully run the businesses are also able to send their children to school.  In the photo: Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition (IMCN) Activities, include monitoring the nutritional status of mothers and the growth trend of their children (MUAC) as well as providing education sessions on healthy nutrition and food. The mothers receive a ration of Wheat Soya Blend plus (WSB+). Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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