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"crop production": 749 results 

 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: a view of the land in Community Calavera, where WFP is implementing its Resilience and Climate Change Programme.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 8641.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: a view of the land in Community Calavera, where WFP is implementing its Resilience and Climate Change Programme.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 8024.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: a view of the land in Community Calavera, where WFP is implementing its Resilience and Climate Change Programme.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 9791.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, Jose Feliciano Perez Martinez enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 7132.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, Jose Feliciano Perez Martinez enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 8009.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her mother Maria Lidia Perez enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 6378.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her mother Maria Lidia Perez enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 6377.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, enjoys a meal of chicken soup she made for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera.   Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 5407.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her husband Santos Alejandro Martinez enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 6259.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From bottom right, clockwise): Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina, Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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6976 x 4643 px 59.06 x 39.31 cm 22858.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From right, clockwise): Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez, Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4191.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From right, clockwise): Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez, Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
6976 x 4643 px 59.06 x 39.31 cm 6614.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her son Fabricio Gabriel enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....jpg
4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 18866.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her son Fabricio Gabriel enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
ELS_20170407_W....JPG
4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 6026.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her son Fabricio Gabriel enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 5414.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From bottom right, clockwise): Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina, Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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6976 x 4643 px 59.06 x 39.31 cm 6928.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From bottom left, clockwise): Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina, Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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6976 x 4643 px 59.06 x 39.31 cm 6704.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From bottom right, clockwise): Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina, Cristina Martinez Perez, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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6976 x 4643 px 59.06 x 39.31 cm 6674.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her daughter Yeimi Judith enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4643 x 6976 px 39.31 x 59.06 cm 6302.00 kb
 
El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her daughter Yeimi Judith enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her son Santos Gregorio enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, and her family  of seven enjoy a meal of chicken soup she made in their home in community Calavera. (From right, clockwise): Maria Lidia Perez, Fabricio Gabriel, Ana Carmelina, Santos Gregorio, Yeimi Judith, Santos Alejandro Martinez.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: a bird eats bread at the home of Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, made chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera. Here, her daughter Yeimi Judith enjoys the meal.  Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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El Salvador, Department of Morazán, Caopera Municipality, Community Calavera, 07 April 2017  Under the Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, WFP provides agricultural training in the Calavera community, building the resilience of the 163 households involved. The main source of income in the community comes from subsistence agriculture, however the soil in the area is of poor quality.  To improve this, WFP facilitated soil conservation trainings and provided all beneficiaries with irrigation systems, which allows them to have crop production all year round. Beneficiaries noticed improvements in their land due to soil conservation, which has improved water infiltration, slope ditches and decreased erosion.   Beneficiaries also participated in practical trainings, learning how to cultivate vegetables in an area of 400 square metres per beneficiary. Families now have access to a much more diverse range of foods – tomatoes, sweet pepper, eggplant, green beans, pipián, squash and coriander – and can earn an income by selling the surplus to surrounding communities.  Beneficiaries receive vouchers from WFP for their participation in the programme, which they redeem for cash at local banks and use to purchase food for their families.  In the photo: Cristina Martinez Perez, a beneficiary of WFP's Resilience and Climate Change Programme in El Salvador, cooks chicken soup for her family of seven at their home in community Calavera.   Cristina only makes soup when she receives her WFP voucher, as she cannot afford the ingredients without it. The voucher allows her family to have access to varied foods like fruits, meats, cereal and dairy. In addition, her agricultural work for the programme means she earns her own income through selling the vegetables she grows.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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