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"earthquakes": 413 results 

 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3804.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4220.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4642.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4918.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4743.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3864.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Kyrgyzstan, Suzak region. 14 June 2017  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Because it’s Ramadan, Muhamadamin from Suzak region in Kyrgyzstan is finishing his life-long project – a poem on faith, tolerance, patience and perseverance. Eager to be the first listeners, his three sons and 17 grandchildren came together for this month of Ramadan. Though it’s just a few lepeshka (flat bread, nan), cherry jam and tea for them to break a fast, they feel proud to share this very important moment in the Muhamadamin’s life.    Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, Uzgen region. 12 June 2017  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Because it’s Ramadan, Feruza from Uzgen region in southern Kyrgyzstan can give a special treat to her 4 children and parents-in-law – every day she bakes cakes and fruit pies for her family. Her family is taking a photo before they start cooking for iftar.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, 22 December 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A WFP staffer facilitates a community consultation to prioritize projects in their area. Communities and beneficiaries are key part of project planning and implementation.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, 11 October 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supported the Ministry of Emergencies to develop Information Analysis and Management System, a hybrid web and mobile application to systematize data collection and analysis of disasters.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, 11 October 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supported the Ministry of Emergencies to develop Information Analysis and Management System, a hybrid web and mobile application to systematize data collection and analysis of disasters.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, 10 September 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP skills training and knowledge transfer activities to support smallholder farmers with innovative agricultural techniques that can boost production and incomes  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Kyrgyzstan, 4 June 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Rural women in Kyrgyzstan, are felting and embroidering shyrdaks - traditional Kyrgyz carpets – at the WFP-supported training. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. So new skills will help vulnerable rural women will benefit from a stable employment and income for their families.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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Ecuador, Portoviejo, 13 May 2016  The 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Ecuador on 16 April 2016 had a devastating impact, with more than 650 people killed, 7,000 injured and more than 500,000 in need of humanitarian assistance. The earthquake’s epicentre was close to the town of Muisne and 170km northwest of the capital Quito. Although the epicentre was in a remote rural area, several towns of coastal provinces were affected.  In response to the emergency, WFP has distributed food to more than 105, 000 people in shelters, hospitals and communities.  In the photo: A tent at an informal campsite in Mamey Park, Portoviejo where families who lost their homes to the earthquakes live.  Photo: WFP/Berta Tilmantaite
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