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"earthquakes": 458 results 

 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3804.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4220.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4642.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4918.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4743.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3864.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4317.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3748.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3586.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  From left to right: - Tarek Farid Keshavjee, WFP Senior Regional Logistics Officer; - Ivan Klicko, WFP logistics; - Constantine Spivakov from SHERP; - Richard Gama, WFP driver from South Sudan  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14939.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15036.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: UNHAS staff preparing an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Passengers boarding an UNHAS ET410 aircraft in Juba International Airport.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 13 June 2018  In South Sudan, as many as 7.1 million people – more than half the population – would not know where their next meal is coming from in the absence of humanitarian assistance. Hunger peaks during the annual lean season, before the next harvest, when food is most scare. In response, WFP and partners aim to assist up to 4.8 million hungry people with the worst-affected areas of the country at the peak of the lean season, in June and July. Without a sustained, comprehensive response, millions of people are at risk in this fifth straight year of conflict. UNHAS provides passenger and light cargo services to some of South Sudan’s most remote and challenging locations that would otherwise be difficult to reach by land due to vast distances, limited infrastructure and insecurity. Without the service, aid workers would have been unable to provide support to remote communities badly affected by the earthquakes. In South Sudan, UNHAS operates its largest humanitarian air operation, enabling, monthly more than 8,000 aid workers from over 282 humanitarian agencies to access hard-to-reach destinations.   In the Photo: Check in - UNHAS airport staff weighing and tagging passengers baggage and cross-referencing the manifest with the passenger’s ID and their tickets in Juba International Airport. UNHAS use different tag colors for the passenger’s luggage. Each tag has the call sign for each aircraft on them and then are tagged accordingly. This helps ground staff to recognize by color and call sign to which aircraft the baggage needs to be loaded.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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