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"earthquakes": 396 results 

 
Kyrgyzstan, Suzak region. 14 June 2017  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Because it’s Ramadan, Muhamadamin from Suzak region in Kyrgyzstan is finishing his life-long project – a poem on faith, tolerance, patience and perseverance. Eager to be the first listeners, his three sons and 17 grandchildren came together for this month of Ramadan. Though it’s just a few lepeshka (flat bread, nan), cherry jam and tea for them to break a fast, they feel proud to share this very important moment in the Muhamadamin’s life.    Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 7452.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Uzgen region. 12 June 2017  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Because it’s Ramadan, Feruza from Uzgen region in southern Kyrgyzstan can give a special treat to her 4 children and parents-in-law – every day she bakes cakes and fruit pies for her family. Her family is taking a photo before they start cooking for iftar.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 3683.00 kb
 
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Kyrgyzstan, 22 December 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A WFP staffer facilitates a community consultation to prioritize projects in their area. Communities and beneficiaries are key part of project planning and implementation.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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4608 x 3456 px 162.56 x 121.92 cm 4426.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 11 October 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supported the Ministry of Emergencies to develop Information Analysis and Management System, a hybrid web and mobile application to systematize data collection and analysis of disasters.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 47.55 x 31.70 cm 4979.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 11 October 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supported the Ministry of Emergencies to develop Information Analysis and Management System, a hybrid web and mobile application to systematize data collection and analysis of disasters.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 47.55 x 31.70 cm 5279.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 10 September 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP skills training and knowledge transfer activities to support smallholder farmers with innovative agricultural techniques that can boost production and incomes  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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4608 x 3072 px 39.01 x 26.01 cm 5540.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 4 June 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.   Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: Rural women in Kyrgyzstan, are felting and embroidering shyrdaks - traditional Kyrgyz carpets – at the WFP-supported training. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. So new skills will help vulnerable rural women will benefit from a stable employment and income for their families.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 6426.00 kb
 
Ecuador, Portoviejo, 13 May 2016  The 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Ecuador on 16 April 2016 had a devastating impact, with more than 650 people killed, 7,000 injured and more than 500,000 in need of humanitarian assistance. The earthquake’s epicentre was close to the town of Muisne and 170km northwest of the capital Quito. Although the epicentre was in a remote rural area, several towns of coastal provinces were affected.  In response to the emergency, WFP has distributed food to more than 105, 000 people in shelters, hospitals and communities.  In the photo: A tent at an informal campsite in Mamey Park, Portoviejo where families who lost their homes to the earthquakes live.  Photo: WFP/Berta Tilmantaite
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6016 x 4016 px 50.94 x 34.00 cm 6556.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Naryn Region, Kochkor, 20 November 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A group of rural women in Kochkor felt and embroider shyrdaks (traditional carpets) at the WFP-supported training. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1314.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Naryn Region, Kochkor, 20 November 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: A group of rural women in Kochkor felt and embroider shyrdaks (traditional carpets) at the WFP-supported training. Shyrdaks are very popular in rural Kyrgyzstan and make a part of a fiancé’s dowry. This training is arranged to help rural women learn new skills to earn better incomes while preserving traditional handicraft knowledge.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 1316.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, 24 April 2016  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.  Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources.  Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.     Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: In Kyrgyzstan, WFP rolled out a national skills training mainly on agricultural techniques and income generating activities. These also included a training on bee farming. Poor families learn how to produce and market honey.  Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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5312 x 2988 px 187.40 x 105.41 cm 8004.00 kb
 
Philippines, Lanao del Norte. 16 March 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP helps communities affected by conflict and natural disasters to rebuild their lives by encouraging self-sufficiency through food and cash assistance programmes. People are given food or cash in exchange for their participation in asset-creation activities and vocational skills training aimed at strengthening their livelihoods and building resilience to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants of WFP's cash-based assistance receive their cash entitlements in Lanao del Norte.  Photo: WFP/Marilou Cezar
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 2291.00 kb
 
Philippines, Lanao del Norte. 16 March 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP helps communities affected by conflict and natural disasters to rebuild their lives by encouraging self-sufficiency through food and cash assistance programmes. People are given food or cash in exchange for their participation in asset-creation activities and vocational skills training aimed at strengthening their livelihoods and building resilience to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants of WFP's cash-based assistance receive their cash entitlements in Lanao del Norte.  Photo: WFP/Marilou Cezar
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 3298.00 kb
 
Philippines, Lanao del Norte. 16 March 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP helps communities affected by conflict and natural disasters to rebuild their lives by encouraging self-sufficiency through food and cash assistance programmes. People are given food or cash in exchange for their participation in asset-creation activities and vocational skills training aimed at strengthening their livelihoods and building resilience to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants of WFP's cash-based assistance receive their cash entitlements in Lanao del Norte.  Photo: WFP/Marilou Cezar
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 2429.00 kb
 
Philippines, Lanao del Norte. 16 March 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP helps communities affected by conflict and natural disasters to rebuild their lives by encouraging self-sufficiency through food and cash assistance programmes. People are given food or cash in exchange for their participation in asset-creation activities and vocational skills training aimed at strengthening their livelihoods and building resilience to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants of WFP's cash-based assistance receive their cash entitlements in Lanao del Norte.  Photo: WFP/Marilou Cezar
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 2707.00 kb
 
Philippines, Lanao del Norte. 16 March 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP helps communities affected by conflict and natural disasters to rebuild their lives by encouraging self-sufficiency through food and cash assistance programmes. People are given food or cash in exchange for their participation in asset-creation activities and vocational skills training aimed at strengthening their livelihoods and building resilience to shocks.  In the Photo: Participants of WFP's cash-based assistance receive their cash entitlements in Lanao del Norte.  Photo: WFP/Marilou Cezar
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4128 x 2322 px 145.63 x 81.92 cm 3093.00 kb
 
Philippines, South Upi, Maguindanao. 10 March 2016.  A lower-middle-income country, the Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  Working closely with the Government of the Philippines, other United Nations agencies, non-governmental organizations and communities, WFP focuses on increasing long-term food and nutrition security while assisting people and communities to build resilience to be better prepared for the consequences of disasters.  In the Photo: Girls from South Upi, Maguindanao take a break from their after-school games.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5867.00 kb
 
Philippines, South Upi, Maguindanao. 10 March 2016.  A lower-middle-income country, the Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  Working closely with the Government of the Philippines, other United Nations agencies, non-governmental organizations and communities, WFP focuses on increasing long-term food and nutrition security while assisting people and communities to build resilience to be better prepared for the consequences of disasters.  In the Photo: A child from South Upi, Maguindanao laughs as his grandmother lifts him.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4577.00 kb
 
Philippines, Juban, Sorsogon. 20 January 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP’s work helps vulnerable communities prepare for and respond to shocks through local community projects, innovative scientific technology, and enhancement of logistics and supply chain management through the establishment of disaster response centres in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. In the event of a sudden-onset emergency, WFP provides support such as rice and high-energy biscuits to affected people as well as logistics and telecommunications support to humanitarian operators.  In the Photo: Representatives from Yum! Australia observe the disaster preparedness and response project in Sorsogon. Emergency responders from Juban, Sorsogon showcase response protocols in collapsed building and flooding scenarios.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5128.00 kb
 
Philippines, Juban, Sorsogon. 20 January 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP’s work helps vulnerable communities prepare for and respond to shocks through local community projects, innovative scientific technology, and enhancement of logistics and supply chain management through the establishment of disaster response centres in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. In the event of a sudden-onset emergency, WFP provides support such as rice and high-energy biscuits to affected people as well as logistics and telecommunications support to humanitarian operators.  In the Photo: Representatives from Yum! Australia observe the disaster preparedness and response project in Sorsogon. Emergency responders from Juban, Sorsogon showcase response protocols in collapsed building and flooding scenarios.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5465.00 kb
 
Philippines, Juban, Sorsogon. 20 January 2016.  The Philippines has a food deficit that is exacerbated by the combined effects of man-made and natural disasters that include earthquakes, typhoons and armed conflict.  WFP’s work helps vulnerable communities prepare for and respond to shocks through local community projects, innovative scientific technology, and enhancement of logistics and supply chain management through the establishment of disaster response centres in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. In the event of a sudden-onset emergency, WFP provides support such as rice and high-energy biscuits to affected people as well as logistics and telecommunications support to humanitarian operators.  In the Photo: Representatives from Yum! Australia observe the disaster preparedness and response project in Sorsogon. Emergency responders from Juban, Sorsogon showcase response protocols in collapsed building and flooding scenarios.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
PHI_20160120_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 4597.00 kb
 
Philippines, Tubungan, 24 December 2015  The Philippines' food deficit is exacerbated by natural disasters including earthquakes and typhoons. WFP helps vulnerable communities prepare for and respond to shocks through local community projects, innovative science technology, and enhancement of logistics and supply chain management through the establishment of disaster response centres in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.   In the event of a sudden-onset emergency, WFP provides support such as rice and high-energy biscuits to affected people as well as logistics and telecommunications support to humanitarian operators.  In the photo: after Typhoon Melor (locally known as Nona) hit the Philippines, WFP provided trucks to the Department of Social Welfare and Development to transport shelter materials to affected communities.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5434.00 kb
 
Philippines, Tubungan, 24 December 2015  The Philippines' food deficit is exacerbated by natural disasters including earthquakes and typhoons. WFP helps vulnerable communities prepare for and respond to shocks through local community projects, innovative science technology, and enhancement of logistics and supply chain management through the establishment of disaster response centres in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.   In the event of a sudden-onset emergency, WFP provides support such as rice and high-energy biscuits to affected people as well as logistics and telecommunications support to humanitarian operators.  In the photo: after Typhoon Melor (locally known as Nona) hit the Philippines, WFP provided trucks to the Department of Social Welfare and Development to transport shelter materials to affected communities.  Photo: WFP/Faizza Tanggol
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5620.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh, 27 October 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supports creation of productive assets including fisheries to improve income generation opportunities and livelihoods of the most vulnerable rural communities. It also boosts local economies through job creation and improved nutrition.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
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2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 732.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Osh, 27 October 2015  Food insecurity is seasonal and correlated with chronic and deepening poverty in Kyrgyzstan. An estimated twelve percent of the population are food insecure. Although Kyrgyzstan’s gross domestic product (GDP) has increased over the past decade, growth has not trickled down to the poorest.

Insufficient social safety leave the poorest families with few opportunities to develop their skills or chances to meet their immediate needs. Frequent natural disasters, such as landslides and earthquakes, a complex ethnic and political environment, and a high dependency on the import of basic foods such as wheat further exhaust people’s resources. 
Initially operating in an emergency capacity, WFP assisted nearly a million of Kyrgyzstan’s most vulnerable in the wake of the global food crisis and the failed harvests of 2008, and again following interethnic violence in Osh and Jalal-Abad in 2010.  
 
Since then, WFP’s overarching objective has been to strengthen the Kyrgyz Government’s capacity to reduce food insecurity and undernutrition and to support communities’ long-term resilience. In 2011, with the emphasis shifting towards development and recovery, we implemented a country programme supporting more than half a million people through asset creation and income generation activities. WFP’s current activities focus on an improved school meals project, rural development, social protection, disaster risk management and climate change adaptation.  In the photo: WFP supports creation of productive assets including fisheries to improve income generation opportunities and livelihoods of the most vulnerable rural communities. It also boosts local economies through job creation and improved nutrition.   Photo: WFP/Elizabeth Zalkind
KYR_20161027_W....JPG
2808 x 1872 px 99.06 x 66.04 cm 2499.00 kb

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