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"ebola emergency": 1645 results 

 
Sierra Leone, Lagor Community, Lower Banta Chiefdom, 02 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  In the photo: General Food Distribution (GFD) in Lagor Community, Lower Banta Chiefdom. WFP and its implementing partner Community Integrated Development Organization (CIDO) are providing one months’ food assistance in several hot-spot communities in this chiefdom where, in January, the majority of new Ebola cases in the District arose from.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5308.00 kb
 
Sierra Leone, Pamlap Village, Makari Gbanti Chiefdom, Bombali District, 03 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  In the Photo: General Food Distribution in Pamlap Village, Makari Gbanti Chiefdom, Bombali District: WFP along with its implementing partner, Caritas, give life-saving food assistance in several high-priority communities in this chiefdom where the majority of new Ebola cases are being reported. On the day of the visit, 20 metric tons of assorted food commodities (rice, beans, SuperCereal, salt, oil) were distributed to approximately 400 households with distributions ongoing to reach all targeted households in the community. Those who receive food assistance must wash their hands and have their temperature taken before proceeding to register at the food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 13334.00 kb
 
Guinea, Kánkàn (Kankan), 27 February 2015  At the end of February, the critical Ebola situation subsided with only one proven case of Ebola treatment from Lola. WFP continues to provide general food distribution to victims of the Ebola epidemic and vulnerable people in communities such as N‘Zérékoré, Kankan and Forecariah where WFP is supporting contact cases, patients in Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) and Ebola survivors.  In the photo: children attending a school located in front of the WFP Forward Logistics Base (FLB) in Kánkàn.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6241.00 kb
 
Guinea, Kissidougou, 24 February 2015  At the end of February, the critical Ebola situation subsided with only one proven case of Ebola treatment from Lola. WFP continues to provide general food distribution to victims of the Ebola epidemic and vulnerable people in communities such as N‘Zérékoré, Kankan and Forecariah where WFP is supporting contact cases, patients in Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) and Ebola survivors.  The WFP Common Services plans to establish one main logistics hub per country and at least 11 Forward Logistics Bases (FLBs) across the three countries is being operationalised through the Logistics Cluster and WFP. Forward Logistics Bases are set up in remote areas in the three Ebola affected countries, in Guinea they have been established in Kissidougou and Nzerekore. These will support the health response with common services such as construction, storage, procurement and transport.  In the Photo: a helicopter, chartered by the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS), transporting humanitarian staff from Juba to Mingkaman.  All passengers boarding the UNHAS flight from Kissidougou airport must wash their hands with a disinfectant gel and take a surgical mask. Increased protective measures on UNHAS flights operating in the three affected areas ensure both passengers and UNHAS staff will not be exposed to the risk of infection of Ebola.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5795.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 10 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3177.00 kb
 
Liberia, Bomi County, 09 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  Vincent Ward Public School is one of the 54 schools assisted by the WFP School Meals programme in Liberia. The programme currently targets 127,000 pupils in 10 of the 15 counties in Liberia. Following the Ebola outbreak the government closed schools as a preventive measure to avoid the transmission of the disease in the scholastic environment.   Now that the pandemic is under control the government has allowed schools that are compliant with the protective measures to reopen in March 2015. Attendance is steadily increasing as the parents’ fears subside and from the food aid offered by WFP.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 7556.00 kb
 
Liberia, Tombekai, Bomi County, 07 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  Tombekai is a 124 person village in Bomi, Liberia with three Ebola cases resulting in death and one female survivor, Miatta.  During the early part of the outbreak, many of the villagers fled for fear of being quarantined. Eventually, all of the villagers returned to Tombekai where farming is slowly being revived and stability is strengthening.  Thanks to WFP’s food intervention Bomi’s children, including children from Tombekai, are also resuming those schools declared safe and compliant. WFP’s school meals provide the essential nutrients children require, encourages attendance and improves their cognivitive abilities - they can focus on learning, rather than on when and where their next meal will come from.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 9425.00 kb
 
Guinea, Kánkàn (Kankan), 27 February 2015

At the end of February, the critical Ebola situation subsided with only one proven case of Ebola treatment from Lola.
WFP continues to provide general food distribution to victims of the Ebola epidemic and vulnerable people in communities such as N‘Zérékoré, Kankan and Forecariah where WFP is supporting contact cases, patients in Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) and Ebola survivors.

In the photo: children riding bicycles to their school located in front of the WFP Forward Logistics Base (FLB) in Kánkàn.

Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3891.00 kb
 
Guinea, N‘Zérékoré (N'Zerekore), 24 February 2015  At the end of February, the critical Ebola situation subsided with only one proven case of Ebola treatment from Lola. WFP continues to provide general food distribution to victims of the Ebola epidemic and vulnerable people in communities such as N‘Zérékoré, Kankan and Forecariah where WFP is supporting contact cases, patients in Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) and Ebola survivors.  In the photo: General Food Distribution (GFD) to communities are organized in a way that minimizes the chances of infection. The food rations delivered include pulses, Super Cereal, cooking oil, 50kg's of rice and are sufficient to cover one month.   Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Sierra Leone, Moyamba, 03 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  In the photo:  the Norwegian funded basecamp and Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in Moyamba. The basecamp has been built by the Norwegian Directorate for Civil Protection (DSB) to “help the helpers”, providing hygiene, food and accommodation for the humanitarian workers in the ETC or those undertaking work in response to the Ebola pandemic.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 8173.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 09 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  It is thought that fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are natural Ebola virus hosts. Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6531.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 09 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  It is thought that fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are natural Ebola virus hosts. Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6892.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 09 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  It is thought that fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are natural Ebola virus hosts. Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6610.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4739.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  In the Photo: Professional Backpack Sprayer.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3662.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4555.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3743.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4623.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5792.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
LIR_20150306_W....jpg
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3527.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3514.00 kb
 
Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Liberia, Monrovia, 06 March 2015  WFP is supporting the medical response to the Ebola emergency by providing food to families and communities affected by the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. WFP is also assisting the wider humanitarian community with logistics, helping other organisations to get aid workers and critical supplies into the affected areas.  With its expertise in logistics, WFP has been given the job of coordinating logistics for the entire humanitarian community involved in the Ebola response through the Logistics Cluster. For example, the WFP logistics team in Monrovia built four Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) as well as other units in other areas of the country.  In Monrovia the grounds of the Samuel K. Doe Stadium were designated to host the ETUs as well as the logistics cluster warehouse where items pertaining to all the humanitarian players involved are stored, dispatched and managed by WFP. With the confirmed cases steadily decreasing it was decided that WFP, with support from the German Red Cross (DRK) and the German Army, would transform one ETU into a Severe Infection Temporary Treatment Unit (SITTU) to fill a gap in infectious disease care.  The SITTU is designed to accept patients with symptoms consistent with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) but not yet confirmed—an important gap to cover, given that much of the Liberian health system ceased providing non-Ebola related health services during the acute stages of the outbreak.  A second ETU has been transformed into a major training center for new health workers that will be deployed around the entire country. The SITTU accepts both walk-ins and referrals from other health facilities. Once at the SITTU, patients who test positive for Ebola will be transferred to an ETU; patients who test negative will be treated for other infectious diseases. Those with no symptoms will be transferred to a health facility. The SITTU is intended to improve the level of clinical care for infectious non Ebola affected patients as well as reducing risk for non-Ebola affected patients who may otherwise seek care at an ETU.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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