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"emergencies": 475 results 

 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
UNHRD_20180706....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1822.00 kb
 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
UNHRD_20180706....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1667.00 kb
 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
UNHRD_20180706....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1302.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5954 x 3969 px 210.04 x 140.02 cm 6873.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6505.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9275.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5975 x 3983 px 210.78 x 140.51 cm 7087.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5957 x 3971 px 210.15 x 140.09 cm 5631.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6240 x 4160 px 220.13 x 146.76 cm 7437.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5508 x 3672 px 194.31 x 129.54 cm 3927.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6005.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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Niger, 23 March 2018  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are one of the latest digital innovation breakthroughs in humanitarian assistance.  As humanitarian emergencies become increasingly prolonged and complex, the role of technology is ever more crucial in enabling better and faster response when disaster strikes.  Until recently, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) — commonly referred to as drones — was limited to aviation experts and a handful of aficionados. With their relatively low costs and unique mobility, however, they are increasingly seen as a valuable tool in providing humanitarian assistance.  The World Food Programme (WFP), a leader in emergency response, is using and exploring the use of drones in its operations. Below are the 5 reasons why.  1. Faster access, greater reach In the aftermath of a natural disaster, accessing affected areas to assess damage and needs is one of the key challenges the organization faces — and every second counts. Unlike a helicopter or a large team of people, a drone can be deployed within minutes of a disaster for rapid and detailed assessments.  When category-5 Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Caribbean in 2017, WFP’s regional office in Panama deployed a drone to see how many houses had been affected and which roads were blocked or cut off. This provided the emergency response team with vital insights, and they quickly realized the tremendous potential behind drone technology.  2. High-resolution imagery and cost effectiveness Until recently, WFP relied on satellite images to get a lot of the data needed from the ground. It is costly and because the images depend on the position of the satellite at a given time, data access is sporadic. The quality of the images also depends on how cloudy the skies at the time they were captured. Drones can fly below the clouds, allowing us to get localised data in real-time at a fraction of the cost. They have the potential to improve the reliability, quality and speed of our assessments and contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response efforts.  3. A valuable asset in emergency preparedness Drone technology is a valuable tool that helps support efforts to prepare for an emergency before a disaster strikes. For instance, the Government of Mozambique recently started using drones to identify and map areas that are vulnerable to floods by comparing high resolution drone imagery taken during rainy and dry seasons. This will help the government move people living in areas at risk to safer grounds before heavy rains.  4. Monitoring climate change, soil health and much more The real potential of drones is leveraged when the content is analysed with Artificial Intelligence (AI) software to obtain data that the naked eye cannot see. Crop and soil health, for example, can be monitored through software that analyses drone images. In Colombia, WFP is already exploring the use of drones to monitor crops.  Drone imagery can provide farmers with immediate feedback on crop health, help detect and diagnose problems, and support actions. Using computer software, the images can be combined to create high resolution maps that can later be analysed to pinpoint important climate change trends and predictions.  When the use of specialized software is combined with drones, the possibilities are endless. WFP is constantly seeking new ways of using this emerging technology to create better solutions and programmes that allow us to leverage the resources currently available.  5. The humanitarian panorama needs innovation There is a tangible opportunity for the humanitarian world to put emerging and frontier technology at the service of those who need it most, while leveraging and building on each other’s areas of expertise. Since 2014, WFP has been exploring ways to deploy drones in the humanitarian context and defining a drone coordination model.  “Innovation is creating a network between all actors, allowing us to focus on the difference we are making. How effectively are we responding to emergencies? How can we better empower the communities we serve and help those further behind? Technology is key in us being able to do this,” says WFP’s CIO and Director of the Technology Division EnricaPorcari, stressing that having a strong network of actors allows for real innovation to take off and governments must be the first supporters of these efforts.  In the Photo: with the support of the Belgium Government, WFP has organized UAV use and coordination workshops in Myanmar, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Mozambique and Niger (video).  Photo: WFP/Laura Lacanale
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