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"emergencies": 460 results 

 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5954 x 3969 px 210.04 x 140.02 cm 6873.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6505.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9275.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5975 x 3983 px 210.78 x 140.51 cm 7087.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5957 x 3971 px 210.15 x 140.09 cm 5631.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6240 x 4160 px 220.13 x 146.76 cm 7437.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5508 x 3672 px 194.31 x 129.54 cm 3927.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6005.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 5436.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Niger, Takatsaba, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Denise Brown, Director of Emergencies, and Dominique Burgeon in Takatsaba.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Dantata, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Denise Brown, Director of Emergencies, and beneficiaries of Dantata.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Dantata, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Denise Brown, Director of Emergencies, and beneficiaries of Dantata.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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South Sudan,  Gaireng, Ayod county, 01 October 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: the A-Team: A WFP rapid response team wades through a swamp in Gaireng, Ayod county.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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South Sudan, 28 September 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: Samuel Monday, a computer scientist-turned aid worker, gets ready to retire for the night after a tough day in the swamps.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 3 September 20177  The heads of the three UN food agencies are visiting Ethiopia to highlight the critical food and nutrition security situation. Consecutive climate shocks have resulted in back-to-back droughts, which have caused hunger to soar and malnutrition rates to rise to alarming levels. The agency chiefs will discuss how best to strengthen their support to the Government and its systems so that Ethiopia can continue meeting its development goals while simultaneously addressing humanitarian challenges along the way.The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)’s Director-General José Graziano da Silva, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)’s President Gilbert F. Houngbo and the World Food Programme (WFP)’s Executive Director David Beasley will be in Ethiopia from 1-4 September.  In the worst-affected parts of the country, in the south and south-east, rains have failed for the third consecutive year. More than 8.5 million people require food assistance in the second half of 2017. The response led by the Government has begun to stabilize the situation, however additional efforts and support is urgently needed to prevent the situation deteriorating further.  In the photo: The heads of the three UN food agencies based in Rome, donor representatives, government officials and staff at Bole International Ariport in Addis Ababa shortly before flying to the Somali region of Ethiopia. Their visit to Ethiopia was the first joint trip by the three heads of agencies and was to highlight how by working together the three organizations could achieve much more than alone and help both to save lives in emergencies but build up the resilience of communities to climatic shocks such as drought.  Photo: WFP/Peter Smerdon
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South Sudan, Mayendit county, 01 August 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: Sokri Edward Alison, WFP Monitoring Assistant and a veteran of the IRRM, poses for the camera on a recent mission to Mayendit county  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (right) and WFP Video Producer Marco Frattini (left) visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Photolibrary
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley standing at the center) poses for a group shot with WFP staff in Hodeidah, Yemen.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (1st right) and WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley (2nd right) and  are visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley (left) and WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (right) are visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: a view of the Hodeidah port.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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