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"evaluation": 423 results 

 
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Haiti, 8 September 2017  Hurricane Irma, a category 5 hurricane, is one of the strongest hurricanes ever seen in the Atlantic. The change of the hurricane trajectory towards the north decreased its potential impact on Haiti and prevented a major catastrophe. However heavy rains caused flooding, particularly affecting the Northern departments. WFP Office is still assessing the damages. According to the National Civil Protection, sixteen communes in the departments of the North-East, North, Centre, Artibonite and West are partially flooded. 10,085 people were evacuated in 59 temporary shelters. In anticipation of Irma, 63mt of High Energy Biscuits were called forward from the Humanitarian Response Depot in Dubai, enough to assist immediately 80,000 people for four days. The High Energy Biscuit arrived on September 8th in the capital Port-au-Prince. National authorities are leading the humanitarian response to Hurricane Irma, and WFP remains mobilized to support national and local authorities in the response and the evaluation of damages. The humanitarian community is supporting national and local authorities to assist the most affected families and to facilitate the quickest possible return home of the persons currently in temporary shelters. At the request of National Civil Protection (DPC), WFP started to distribute High Energy Biscuit on September 10th for priority distributions to families displaced in shelters in the North East department. Distributions are currently taking place in Fort Liberte and should continue tomorrow in Ouanaminthe.  Photo: WFP/Lorene Didier
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4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 1277.00 kb
 
Ecuador, 25 October 2012  WFP and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) conducted an impact evaluation of the food, cash and voucher pilot project. The impact evaluation showed that while all transfers increased food security, vouchers produced the greatest improvement in dietary diversity, for the least cost. Food produced the largest impact in caloric intake, but vouchers produced the largest improvement in dietary diversity and micronutrient consumption.  In the photo: a voucher used in a pilot project in Ecuador  Photo: WFP/Sebastien Paque
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 4757.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012

The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models. 
A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Cambodian Thoeum Sin, right, with help from Phen Sophy lectures on proper food preparation (CSB) to villagers gathered for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 4165.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 4467.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012

The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models. 
A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Cambodian villager Von Savet and daughter Neang Sovann look on as they and others gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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2000 x 3000 px 16.93 x 25.40 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012

The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models. 
A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Cambodian Thoeum Sin lectures on proper food preparation to villagers gathered for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 4925.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012

The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models. 
A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Cambodian villager Chap Kunthea sits with her daughter Song Rachna as they and others gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 1716 px 25.40 x 14.53 cm 3420.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 1747 px 25.40 x 14.79 cm 4020.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012

The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models. 
A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Cambodian villager Chhoeum Chhouy looks on with daughter Tha Sokmim as they and others gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 3453.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 4197.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 3245.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 3771.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 2000 px 25.40 x 16.93 cm 3675.00 kb
 
Cambodia, Pursat Province, Tramses Village, 27 March 2012  The long-term vision of WFP is for all Cambodians to have access to sufficient and diverse food at all times to meet their nutritional needs. This requires integrated and cross-sectoral investments in robust food security systems that can be fully nationally owned by the Government, civil society, private sector and communities. With a particular emphasis on social protection for the most vulnerable, WFP's goal is to support the development of long-term food security systems while addressing immediate food security needs with sustainable models.  A 2010 mid-term evaluation of the mother-and-child health and nutrition (MCHN) programme found qualitative evidence of improved nutritional status of targeted children, increased attendance at antenatal clinics, higher number of deliveries in health centres, and faster post-delivery recovery of mothers where the programme operated. The intervention also catalysed community-based nutrition programmes, helping to link complementary inputs from non-governmental organization (NGO) cooperating partners with local health services. The National Nutrition Programme is developing intervention models to address undernutrition among mothers and young children with a view to establishing comprehensive nutrition services to be delivered through the health system and at the community level.WFP will work with partners to develop and evaluate approaches such as vouchers for locally fortified blended foods and locally produced nutritious food. WFP will continue with its food fortification projects, including an ongoing rice fortification pilot.  Beneficiaries of the mother-and-child health and nutrition gather for aid from the World Food Programme in Tramses Village, Boeung Batkandol Commune, Bakan District, Pursat Province.  Photo: WFP/David Longstreath
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3000 x 1643 px 25.40 x 13.91 cm 4217.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
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3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 4593.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
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3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 7208.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 4457.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 5015.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 9330.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 9412.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 7606.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial otal loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 5525.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, July 2011   Heavy rainfall and repeated storms have been reported in North and South Hwanghae provinces starting June 23rd and continuing through July and August. Three assessment and monitoring visits were conducted by the cluster to date, covering Haeju city, Chongdan, Yonan, and Paechon counties and Sohung. The impact of heavy rain and floods on current food availability appears to be localized and limited. The most affected populations are predominantly cooperative farmers, since they keep their yearly allocation of food stock at home (distributed in December after the main harvest). Therefore a majority of the cooperative farmer population suffered partial/total loss of their food stocks. The Government reported serious damage to agricultural land and irrigation systems, and an expected a decrease in yield for the main October harvest. Damages to both early crops (wheat, barley and potatoes) and main crops (rice and maize) could possibly reduce the overall food availability for the main harvest in October. UN agencies however affirm that accurate projections about future food availability after the main harvest can only be made after the CFSAM, planned for end-September 2011.   Photo: WFP/Abdur Rahim Siddiqui
DPRK_20110724_....jpg
3888 x 2592 px 32.92 x 21.95 cm 6216.00 kb
 
Ethiopia, Tigray, Shimelba refugee camp, February 2012  For more than 20 years, Ethiopia has hosted large numbers of refugees. According to estimates at the time of this evaluation, the country’s total refugee population was near 154,300 and rapidly rising. Shimelba Refugee Camp is located outside of Shiraro in North- ern Ethiopia, about 45 kilometers from the Eritrean border. Food is provided by the United Nations World Food Program. Refugees receive a standard monthly ration of wheat cereal, white bean legumes, lentils or peas, fortified vegetable oil, salt, and sugar. Although WFP has delivered a full basket of food commodities to the camps, Ethiopian refugees are not food-secure throughout the month, have limited livelihood opportunities, are accumulating few assets, have few successful income-generating activities and are not self-reliant.  Photo: WFP/Purnima Kashyap
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Ethiopia, Tigray, Shimelba refugee camp, February 2012  For more than 20 years, Ethiopia has hosted large numbers of refugees. According to estimates at the time of this evaluation, the country’s total refugee population was near 154,300 and rapidly rising. Shimelba Refugee Camp is located outside of Shiraro in North- ern Ethiopia, about 45 kilometers from the Eritrean border. Food is provided by the United Nations World Food Program. Refugees receive a standard monthly ration of wheat cereal, white bean legumes, lentils or peas, fortified vegetable oil, salt, and sugar. Although WFP has delivered a full basket of food commodities to the camps, Ethiopian refugees are not food-secure throughout the month, have limited livelihood opportunities, are accumulating few assets, have few successful income-generating activities and are not self-reliant.  Photo: WFP/Purnima Kashyap
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