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"floods": 5558 results 

 
Madagascar, Antananarivo, Analamanga Region, 10 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181210_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 8661.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Antananarivo, Analamanga Region, 10 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181210_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8276.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Antananarivo, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 11266.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Antananarivo, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 12029.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 10075.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 10923.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 10941.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 10352.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 10571.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Analamanga Region, 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta; the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 10671.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Bombetoka Bay (Boeny Region), 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines. The Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 7417.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Bombetoka Bay (Boeny Region), 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines. The Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
3323 x 4992 px 28.13 x 42.27 cm 8441.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Bombetoka Bay (Boeny Region), 9 December 2018  The lean season has started early across much of Southern Africa. Rainfall has been average to above-average throughout Madagascar since the start of the 2018 rainy season. The poor 2018 harvest caused by an atypical La Niña early in the growing season that brought prolonged dry weather instead of the necessary rain, means poor families and communities are already suffering crisis-level food insecurity in Madagascar.  In the  Photo: the Betsiboka Estuary on the northwest coast of Madagascar is the mouth of Madagascar’s largest river and one of the world’s fast-changing coastlines. The Betsiboka River, 525-kilometre long river, flows northwestward and empties to Bombetoka Bay, forming a large delta.  The river is distinctive for its red-coloured water, which is caused by river sediments. The river carries an enormous amount of reddish-orange silt to the sea. Much of this silt is deposited at the mouth of the river or in the bay.  It is also dramatic evidence of the catastrophic erosion of northwestern Madagascar. Removal of the native forest for cultivation and pastureland during the past 50 years has led to massive annual soil losses approaching 250 metric tonnes per hectare (112 tons per acre) in some regions of the island, the largest amount recorded anywhere in the world.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
MAG_20181209_W....JPG
4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 9440.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3804.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4220.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4642.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4918.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4743.00 kb

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