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Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5234.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3920.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5227.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3138.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 28 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180428_W....JPG
6274 x 4183 px 221.33 x 147.57 cm 6275.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 28 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180428_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9353.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9023.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9134.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7560.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 11710.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9011.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6163 x 4109 px 217.42 x 144.96 cm 6807.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 26 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180426_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9065.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 24 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180424_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4315.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 24 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180424_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 3737.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 24 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180424_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4824.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Camp 4 in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 24 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Camp 4 where WFP engineering team is preparing the land for relocation vulnerable families who’s are living under land slide risk as a monsoon preparation at Kutupalong extension in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180424_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 3454.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Workers building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6428 x 4285 px 226.77 x 151.17 cm 4351.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Workers building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4827.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the PhotoL WFP staff building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4980.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Workers building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4593.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Workers building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4788.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: WFP staff building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6010 x 4007 px 212.02 x 141.36 cm 4717.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 23 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Monsoon rains are coming and WFP Engineers are working around the clock to prepare for heavy rains, floods and landslides.  In the Photo: Workers building a bailey bridge in Modhurchara in Kutupalong extension, Ukhiya, Cox’Bazar where WFP is providing food nutrition assistance. The bridge will make it easier for more Rohingya Refugees to reach WFP food distribution point.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180423_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 4157.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Mazar-e-Sharif, Balkh Province. 1 April 2018.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley meets with community leaders at a Food For Assets project in Khulm district, near Mazar-e-Sharif. The community has been planting trees, constructing irrigation systems and building check dams to harness water supply in this harsh climate that oscillates between seasonal drought and flash floods.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
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3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 2702.00 kb

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