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"food consumption": 624 results 

 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9917.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9053.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6183.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6927.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10226.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8359.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8937.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6432.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6114.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8203.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8100.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 9084.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6612.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8666.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7943.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8553.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 10090.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8160.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Pulka, 20 July 2017
 The lean season is pushing up already alarming rates of hunger and malnutrition across northeastern Nigeria, with roughly 5.2 million people currently facing extreme hunger. This is the planting season, but the Boko Haram insurgency has displaced more than two million people and prevented farmers from accessing their fields.  Since May 2015, the World Food Programme (WFP) has supported national and state emergency agencies as well as humanitarian partners to assist people displaced by Boko Haram violence and since 2016, WFP has been responding to the food security needs caused by the conflict in Northern-Eastern Nigeria. To restore livelihoods, WFP has launched in collaboration with FAO an integrated two-fold approach which combines emergency food assistance with support to smallholder agriculture production (seeds and tools).   The ongoing trend of refugee returns from Cameroon, Niger, and Chad has put increased pressure on the existing displacement situation in the bordering towns of Banki, Gamboru, Ngala, Damasak, and Pulka. The prevalence of poor food consumption is relatively high among newly arrived households and those not receiving food assistance in eastern Borno State.  In the Photo: Nigerian returnees from Cameroon living in a camp in Pulka received food from WFP.
 Photo: WFP/Amadou Baraze
NIR_20170720_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 7069.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6674.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7045.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 7873.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 8796.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 9402.00 kb
 
Karamoja, Uganda, 5 July 2017  The northeast region of Karamoja is home to approximately 1 million people with mainly pastoral and agro-pastoral socio-cultural traditions. It has the highest poverty and undernutrition rates in Uganda, and
stresses persist as a result of challenges related to weather, environmental conditions, poor infrastructure and low human capital development. The June 2017 Food Security and Nutrition Assessment in Karamoja found that 13.8 percent of children under five are acutely malnourished. Nearly half (45 percent) of the households in Karamoja have poor or borderline food consumption patterns.  WFP plans to treat around 100,000 malnourished people in Karamoja during 2017, through its community based supplementary feeding programme.  WFP provided a “protective ration’’ of cereal, pulses, vegetable oil and Super Cereal to families with malnourished children in Karamoja, throughout the lean season May-August 2017. WFP introduced the protective ration because it found other household members were sharing the fortified food ration given for treating malnourished children.   In the photo: WFP nutrition activities in Karamoja Photo: WFP/Claire Nevill
UGA_20170705_W....JPG
3648 x 5472 px 128.69 x 193.04 cm 7181.00 kb

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