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"food for assets": 4179 results 

 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5234.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3920.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5227.00 kb
 
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, 9 May 2018  The Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley, has concluded an official visit to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from 8-11 May.

“I came to DPRK to listen, look and learn with an open mind. This visit has given me a first-hand opportunity to assess the needs and evaluate WFP’s operations on the ground.  While there are significant challenges ahead, I am nevertheless optimistic. I see a country that is working hard to achieve food security and good nutrition. Since WFP began working here 23 years ago, much progress has been made, but much work lies ahead. There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children. I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”
 
During his visit, Beasley spent two days in the capitol city Pyongyang meeting with senior government officials and two days visiting a number of WFP projects in different parts of the rural areas of the country. He travelled to Sinwon County in South Hwanghae Province where he saw a food-for-assets project in Komchon Ri village and visited a WFP-supported children’s nursery. He also travelled by vehicle from Pyongyang to Sinuiju City in North Pyongan province, visiting a local factory where WFP produces fortified biscuits for its projects.
 
WFP aims to assist 650,000 women and children in DPR Korea every month, providing highly nutritious, fortified cereals and biscuits that can address their nutritional needs.  Funding shortfalls have meant that rations have had to be reduced and suspended in some cases.  In the Photo: Sinwon County has 19 villages or “ri”, with a population of about 86,800 people, about half of whom are farmers who grow rice, maize, potatoes, barley and wheat. With mountains all around the area is prone to drought and floods. A dry spell in 2017 caused a decrease in agricultural production of about 13 percent. This county has been receiving WFP food assistance since 1999.  WFP supported the construction of a water reservoir in Komchon Ri, Sinwon county, South Hwanghae province, in the autumn of 2017. Before, all water for irrigation came from a small stream at the bottom of the valley, but this wasn’t enough when the water levels were low. Now the reservoir irrigates about 1,100 hectares of land and has led to an increase in agricultural production. 2,944 people worked on the construction for 40 days, receiving maize and pulses for themselves and their families, thus providing food for a total of 11,482 people.   In addition to food, WFP also contributed necessary equipment such as shovels, pickaxes, wheelbarrows, boots and gloves, while the community provided cement and stones for construction.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
DPRK_20180509_....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3138.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Wazirabad, Federally Administered Tribal Areas. 4 April 2018.  In the Photo:the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley (2nd from right) visiting FFA projects (irrigation canals) help local community of former IDPs increase agricultural productivity and economic opportunities.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
PAK_20180404_W....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 2951.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Wazirabad, Federally Administered Tribal Areas. 4 April 2018.  In the Photo: FFA projects (irrigation canals) help local community of former IDPs increase agricultural productivity and economic opportunities.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
PAK_20180404_W....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 5748.00 kb
 
Pakistan, Wazirabad, Federally Administered Tribal Areas. 4 April 2018.  In the Photo: FFA projects (irrigation canals) help local community of former IDPs increase agricultural productivity and economic opportunities.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
PAK_20180404_W....JPG
2432 x 3648 px 85.80 x 128.69 cm 4005.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Mazar-e-Sharif, Balkh Province. 1 April 2018.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley meets with community leaders at a Food For Assets project in Khulm district, near Mazar-e-Sharif. The community has been planting trees, constructing irrigation systems and building check dams to harness water supply in this harsh climate that oscillates between seasonal drought and flash floods.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
AFG_20180401_W....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 2702.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Mazar-e-Sharif, Balkh Province. 1 April 2018.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley meets with community leaders at a Food For Assets project in Khulm district, near Mazar-e-Sharif. The community has been planting trees, constructing irrigation systems and building check dams to harness water supply in this harsh climate that oscillates between seasonal drought and flash floods.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
AFG_20180401_W....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 3749.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Mazar-e-Sharif, Balkh Province. 1 April 2018.  In the Photo: the Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley meets with community leaders at a Food For Assets project in Khulm district, near Mazar-e-Sharif. The community has been planting trees, constructing irrigation systems and building check dams to harness water supply in this harsh climate that oscillates between seasonal drought and flash floods.  Photo: WFP/Silke Buhr
AFG_20180401_W....JPG
3648 x 2432 px 128.69 x 85.80 cm 2874.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180322_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2696.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180322_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2525.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180322_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2697.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180322_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2690.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2892.00 kb
 
Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, Kankhomba village, Zomba district, 22 March 2018  For many years, farmers in Kankhomba village and surrounding communities in Zomba district have faced the rage of the Namilambe river, washing away their crops, houses and property downstream. The result of climate change and severe deforestation in the surrounding communities, this has made the residents of Kankhomba village and neighbouring communities food insecure.  In 2017, with the support of the World Food Programme (WFP) and cooperating partner World Vision Malawi, the communities were taught how to control the flow of water from the hills and harvest it, as well as how to conserve the environment by planting trees on the hills and along the river banks river. The farmers, who call themselves ‘Community Champions’, dug deep trenches, built dams and planted vetiver grass - a type of hedge with strong roots that prevents erosion of the land - to control the water speed and stop it from flooding their fields.  “I had always struggled to raise money to buy maize seeds and fertilizers for my garden. It pained me every year when water from the hills washed away my hard work. Thus, I did manual labour almost every day to buy food for my family,” says Pilirani Machemba, a resident of Kankhomba village, married with four children.  “Last year, I harvested only four bags of maize, however, this year (2017/2018 growing season) the crops have done well because my seeds and fertilizers have not been washed away. I am expecting to harvest 15 bags of maize,” adds Pilirani excitedly.  “Although we had little rains this year, I used the water we harvested in the deep trenches to irrigate my crop field and vegetable gardens,” says Pilirani.  Six other families have also benefited similarly from the project, doubling their yields in the 2017/2018 growing season. The communities were also trained on how to make compost manurefor their fields.  “I made compost manure which I applied to complement fertilizers. This helped me to reduce by half the amount of money I was spending to buy fertilizers. At the same time, the compost manure retains moisture, so that even though we did not have adequate rains this year, my crops did not wilt,” explains Pilirani.  To address deforestation and its impact, WFP supported the ‘Community Champions’ with 25,000 seedlings which they planted around Ulumba hills and along Namilambe river. The trees will in the long term help reduce siltation on the Namilambe riverbed.  For Pilirani and fellow members of ‘Community Champions’, the skills they have learned through the project will stay with them for the rest of their lives and will be passed on to future generations, thus improving their children’s livelihoods.  “Even if WFP and its partners now leave our community, they have given us a lifetime of skills — they will always be with us, helping to improve our livelihoods forever,” concludes Pilirani.  In 2017, nearly 724,000 people created community-owned productive assets through WFP Malawi’s Food For Assets (FFA). The communities constructed fish ponds, planted trees and sold vegetables from their backyard gardens. These activities helped families to diversify their diet, while allowing them to build resilience for future climatic shocks.  In the Photo: Pilirani Machemba harvests maize from his garden. Pilirani’s hard work used to be washed away by the river. Now he digs trenches to control the speed of water at the foot of the hills.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Niger, Katambadjé, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Villagers of Katambadjé.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Katambadjé, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Villagers of Katambadjé.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Katambadjé, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Villagers of Katambadjé.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Katambadjé, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Villagers of Katambadjé.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Katambadjé, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Baobab trees in the Katambadjé village.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Takatsaba, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: Peulhs of the region gathered to welcome the mission in Takatsaba for a discussion with pastoralists.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Takatsaba, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: WFP beneficiaries in Takatsaba.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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Niger, Takatsaba, Zinder. 6 March 2018.  WFP helps the poorest to build livelihoods through its community-based asset creation programme. In exchange for food assistance, beneficiaries create assets by regenerating land or rehabilitating ponds. There is a special focus on access to land and markets for the poorest and women and the objective is to build long-term resilience.  In the Photo: WFP beneficiaries in Takatsaba.  Photo: WFP/Tiphaine Walton
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