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Yemen, Saada (Sa'dah), Sajed district, 22 July 2018  Bombed gateway to Saada city, destroyed homes in the old town. Saada, on the border with Saudi Arabia, is the Houthi heartland and one of the areas most affected by the conflict. Food markets, municipal buildings and transport have been destroyed from the fighting.  The rural areas of Saada have always had some of the highest rates of malnutrition in Yemen but destruction of infrastructure and displacement of people in the area has made childhood malnutrition worse. This shack is serving as temporary Al Sharf Health Center in Saada (Sajed district) where Islamic Relief provides WFP Super Cereal and Plumpysup.  In the Photo: Nasser brings Malak (11 month old) to the Al Sharf Health Center; she is tested for malnutrition and found to be severely malnourished. She is being treated with a special peanut based food provided by the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
YEM_20180722_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3786.00 kb
 
Yemen, Saada (Sa'dah), Sajed district, 22 July 2018  Bombed gateway to Saada city, destroyed homes in the old town. Saada, on the border with Saudi Arabia, is the Houthi heartland and one of the areas most affected by the conflict. Food markets, municipal buildings and transport have been destroyed from the fighting.  The rural areas of Saada have always had some of the highest rates of malnutrition in Yemen but destruction of infrastructure and displacement of people in the area has made childhood malnutrition worse. This shack is serving as temporary Al Sharf Health Center in Saada (Sajed district) where Islamic Relief provides WFP Super Cereal and Plumpysup.  In the Photo: Nasser brings Malak (11 month old) to the Al Sharf Health Center; she is tested for malnutrition and found to be severely malnourished. She is being treated with a special peanut based food provided by the World Food Programme.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
YEM_20180722_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 4056.00 kb
 
Somalia, Belet Weyne (Beledweyne), Hiraan region, 07 May 2018  Abdulle Bile, 56 years old, talks his child at a food distribution provided by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) at a distribution point in Jawiil resident, about 30km northeast of the Belet Weyne (Beledweyne) in  Hiraan region of Somalia on Monday 07 May 2018.  Abdulle, and three grandchildren, were fleeing from Beledweyne after a week in flood waters from the Shabelle River.  Belet Weyne (Beledweyne) is currently experiencing its worst flooding ever and over 150,000 people have been displaced.  Photo: WFP/Ismail Taxta
SOM_20180507_W....JPG
5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 2743.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Jazeera, Rubcona County, 24 March 2018  In the Photo: Lilian Mokgosi, Head of Gender and Protection Unit in South Sudan WFP Country Office prepares to distribute ration cards during a headcount exercise in Jazeera, Rubcona County.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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3254 x 4878 px 27.55 x 41.30 cm 5632.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 28 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  In the Photo: Victoria Madukaji, WFP professional driver addressing colleagues during a team building activity  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180228_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6487.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 28 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  In the Photo: Victoria Madukaji, WFP professional driver addressing colleagues during a team building activity  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180228_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6359.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 26 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180226_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 8419.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 26 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180226_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6137.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 26 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180226_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6087.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 26 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180226_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 6837.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Abuja, 26 February 2018  Millions of Nigerian women own and drive cars but being a woman and a professional driver does not carry the highest job appeal for many. Victoria, who works for the World Food Programme (WFP) in Abuja, is one of a few women who are breaking the myth that driving is a man’s job.  “Many people are very surprised when they see me working as a driver,” says Victoria. “I hear them argue: ‘It’s a man’; ‘no, it’s a woman’. When I come down from the vehicle and they see that it is truly a woman at the wheels, some are like ‘wow!’”  Since her first employment as a driver in 2011 with ACTIONAID Nigeria, Victoria has learned to live with being the centre of attention, especially in rural areas. She focuses on her work and impressed her former employers when she even undertook missions where she drove from Nigeria to other countries including neighbouring Cameroon and Benin.  “The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.” Since she joined WFP, in March 2017, she is even more motivated because of what she views as the organization’s grand purpose for humanity.  “What pushes me is that I am a humanitarian worker,” she says. “A lot of people are hungry. The work we are doing at WFP helps to reduce hunger and I am helping to drive out hunger from the land.”  Her colleagues at WFP — both men and women — recognize her dedication, courtesy and humility. They treat her with dignity and respect. She explains that she has not suffered from gender-based discrimination or bias.  But the journey has not been without challenges. When she got her first driving job, it took her several weeks to muster courage to announce it to her husband because of the perception that professional driving is reserved for men. He was initially unhappy but later gave her support and encouragement.  Victoria has been able to strike a delicate balance between her work and her family life.  “It is not easy for a woman but I manage to balance everything,” says the mother of three children. “After work, I create time for my kids. I check their homework and prepare the things they need for school. My husband is very understanding and very supportive.” At WFP, the work schedule is also adapted to encourage her continue with her career. As a breastfeeding mother she is exempted from night shifts and field assignments.  “I am very happy with my work. My work does not affect my family life in any negative way…my work has changed a lot of things for me,” says Victoria.  Her ambition is to become a United Nations international staff member in the next ten years and possibly an ambassador of her country someday. She is taking a Bachelor’s degree in Education, and is also studying part time for a degree in food and nutrition from the National Open University of Nigeria. She would like to encourage more Nigerian women to be daring, self-reliant and not entirely financially dependent on their spouses and men.  “Women should not shy away from so-called men’s jobs — like driving, shoe-making, motor mechanics, and so on. A woman can do any job.”  One of Victoria’s three children is a girl — whom she is training to be independent-minded like herself, in an environment dominated by men.  “I’m training her to be a goal-getter, to have a mind of her own, because when she grows up, there’ll be a lot of challenges out there to be faced.”  Photo: WFP/Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180226_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 211.67 x 141.11 cm 1758.00 kb
 
Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: Casilda Soares after collecting her first supply of Timor Vita. This will help to keep her and her baby healthy.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
TLS_20180116_W....JPG
5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 10749.00 kb
 
Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: Parents wait to receive Timor Vita in Viqueque.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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5184 x 3456 px 43.89 x 29.26 cm 10623.00 kb
 
Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: Parents wait to receive Timor Vita in Viqueque.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: Parents wait to receive Timor Vita in Viqueque.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: A CARE International staff member explains the importance of a healthy diet to pregnant women.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: A CARE International staff member explains the importance of a healthy diet to pregnant women.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Viqueque, 16 January 2018  Originally supporting mothers in 6 municipalities as part of its management of acute malnutrition programme, WFP has temporarily expanded into an additional 3 municipalities in the east of the country, with support from KOICA. This includes Viqueque, Baucau and Lautem. In December 2017, 3,561 pregnant and nursing mothers in these 3 municipalities received their first ration of Timor Vita.These areas were severely affected by El Niño, which threatened farmer’s ability to grow crops and feed their families. Parents in these areas aren’t just receiving Timor Vita but have the opportunity to attend nutrition and gender education sessions. Here, they learn how to cook Timor Vita and incorporate it into their diets. To achieve this, WFP is working in partnership with CARE International and under the request of the Ministry of Health.  For parents in Viqueque, attending the health post was an exciting opportunity to listen to health practitioners and staff from CARE International, who conducted the information sessions. They make sure the pregnant and nursing women understood how to cook with Timor Vita, and encouraged parents to incorporate more diverse, nutritious, affordable and locally-available foods into their diets.  Maria Lourdes Gomes, CARE International Official Facilitator in Viqueque, said her experience is helping her to know the best way to engage with pregnant and nursing women on nutrition and gender education. “We do the information session first, explain everything, do the registration and distribute Timor Vita at the end,” she said. She also makes sure every woman that receives Timor Vita also gets posters from WFP and an informative leaflet about Timor Vita. She is happy to explain how to cook using Timor Vita again to those who arrive late. “Even after a long tiring day,” she said, “because we want to make sure they get the information and understand so that they can use it within their household.”  WFP is committed to working with the Government of Timor-Leste to fight malnutrition, especially for the most vulnerable people — most notably pregnant and nursing women and children aged five and below. Timor-Leste has high levels of maternal and child mortality, and overcoming malnutrition is a crucial step towards ensuring women and children can live long and healthy lives. In order to ensure that families can continue to eat Timor Vita, WFP, the Ministry of Health and the local private company Timor Global established a factory in 2010 to produce this supplement from locally available ingredients. In 2017, a total of 27,154 pregnant and nursing women from 6 municipalities received Timor Vita and incorporated it into their diets. In the Photo: A CARE International staff member explains the importance of a healthy diet to pregnant women.
 Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Dili, Dili. 5 December 2017.  Timor-Leste has the highest levels of malnutrition in Asia and pregnant women and nursing mothers are especially vulnerable. In support of the national action plans and strategies on Zero Hunger, WFP will contribute to building the evidence base for nutrition programming and provide technical assistance for the implementation of food fortification strategies with particular focus on rice fortification. WFP is working with line ministries and through national food security and nutrition to enhance the capacity of national and sub-national institutions to sustainably deliver, monitor, and evaluate social safety programmes including, but not limited to, school meals.  In the Photo: As part of the 16 Days for Activism Campaign, men from WFP TL cooked for the female staff to break with gender stereotypes.  Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Timor-Leste, Dili, Dili. 1 December 2017.  Timor-Leste has the highest levels of malnutrition in Asia and pregnant women and nursing mothers are especially vulnerable. In support of the national action plans and strategies on Zero Hunger, WFP will contribute to building the evidence base for nutrition programming and provide technical assistance for the implementation of food fortification strategies with particular focus on rice fortification. WFP is working with line ministries and through national food security and nutrition to enhance the capacity of national and sub-national institutions to sustainably deliver, monitor, and evaluate social safety programmes including, but not limited to, school meals.  In the Photo: As part of 16 Days Campaign, WFP staff organized a wellness session to climb to the statue of Cristo Rei in Dili.  Photo: WFP/Denita Baptista
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Syria, Homs, 25 November 2017  25 November is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and WFP is fighting violence against women through prevention, empowerment and food assistance.   In the Photo: official launch of the Orange campaign 2017 in Homs, Syria. The event included a gender based violence (GBV) awareness session for all WFP partners in Homs and Hama.   Photo: WFP/Ahmad Hammoud
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Syria, Homs, 25 November 2017  25 November is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and WFP is fighting violence against women through prevention, empowerment and food assistance.   In the Photo: official launch of the Orange campaign 2017 in Homs, Syria. The event included a gender based violence (GBV) awareness session for all WFP partners in Homs and Hama.   Photo: WFP/Ahmad Hammoud
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Syria, Homs, 25 November 2017  25 November is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and WFP is fighting violence against women through prevention, empowerment and food assistance.   In the Photo: official launch of the Orange campaign 2017 in Homs, Syria. The event included a gender based violence (GBV) awareness session for all WFP partners in Homs and Hama.   Photo: WFP/Ahmad Hammoud
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Syria, Homs, 25 November 2017  25 November is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and WFP is fighting violence against women through prevention, empowerment and food assistance.   In the Photo: official launch of the Orange campaign 2017 in Homs, Syria. The event included a gender based violence (GBV) awareness session for all WFP partners in Homs and Hama.   Photo: WFP/Ahmad Hammoud
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Syria, Homs, 25 November 2017  25 November is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and WFP is fighting violence against women through prevention, empowerment and food assistance.   In the Photo: official launch of the Orange campaign 2017 in Homs, Syria. The event included a gender based violence (GBV) awareness session for all WFP partners in Homs and Hama.   Photo: WFP/Ahmad Hammoud
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