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"gender": 1189 results 

 
Sri Lanka, Kilinochchi, 11 May 2015  In Sri Lanka, women's participation in the labour market is 35 percent compared with 76.4 percent for men. In the Northern and Eastern Provinces, where women are particularly disadvantaged, it is difficult for them to find a job and when they find one, they are paid half of their male counterparts' wages. In Northern and Uva provinces, 55 percent of households headed by women are food-insecure compared with 39 percent of households headed by men.  WFP encourages gender empowerment in Sri Lanka by running trainings to provide women with marketable skills and increase their economic independence.  In the photo: women weave baskets as part of WFP's skills training programme in Kilinochchi.  Photo: WFP/Nguyen Duc Hoang
SRL_20150511_W....jpg
4288 x 2848 px 151.27 x 100.47 cm 4244.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 5pm: Mohammed uses a smartphone app to contact his relatives in Syria every day, exchanging voice notes and photos. His son always waits for his father to come home from work, in order to see if there are any new incoming messages, as he doesn't like missing out on any news.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
TUR_20170510_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12663.00 kb
 
Turkey, Gaziantep, 10 May 2017  A day in the life of a Syrian Refugee Family in Turkey.  Fatma and Mohammed fled Syria with their children amidst the country’s ongoing civil war. Three years later, they’re living in a poor area of Gaziantep in south eastern Turkey. Mohammed (40) and Fatma (39) rented an apartment with their three children, Bushra (6), Mariam (8), and Mohammed (5).  Like hundreds of thousands of other refugees living in a similar position in Turkey, the family receives help through an EU-funded programme called the Emergency Social Safety Net, or ESSN. This includes a debit card through which they can spend the equivalent of 28 euros a month per family member on their essential needs such as food, rent, clothes and bills.  In the Photo: 8pm: Dinner. The family always makes sure they spend time together. While Fatma talks to a relative on the phone, her husband Mohammed is playing with the children.  Photo: WFP/Deniz Akkus
TUR_20170510_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12444.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Mamouda Alhai, 55 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 6615.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Mamouda Alhai, 55 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 7313.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Mamouda Alhai, 55 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 5928.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Mamouda Alhai, 55 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 6277.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Mamouda Alhai, 55 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 6425.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Zaleh Abdel Karim, 42 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 8215.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Zaleh Abdel Karim, 42 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 6366.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Zaleh Abdel Karim, 42 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 7823.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Zaleh Abdel Karim, 42 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 8180.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Mr Ibrahim Botonga, 20 years old.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 7401.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Mr Ibrahim Botonga, 20 years old.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 7094.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.

FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Mr Ibrahim Botonga, 20 years old.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 10174.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Ibrahim Botonga, 20 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 8682.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Adamyango Adambai, 20 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 7453.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Adamyango Adambai, 20 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 8544.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Amawali, 30 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 6106.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.  Mr Amawali, 30 years old.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
3279 x 4928 px 27.76 x 41.72 cm 6340.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 9188.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 10024.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 10458.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 9876.00 kb
 
Chad, Goumacherom, Bol, Lake Chad Basin (Bol region), 30 March 2017

CHAD
Chad in Central Africa has one of the highest levels of hunger in the world. Around 87 percent of its mainly rural population lives below the poverty line. High levels of poverty have been exacerbated by numerous conflicts and climate-related disasters over the past 50 years.
People depend on farming and livestock for their livelihoods, but agriculture is challenging as the El Niño weather phenomenon is making rainy seasons unpredictable. This places even more strain on vulnerable families living in the Sahelian belt. Around 11.7 percent of children under five are stunted, with low height for their age caused by chronic malnutrition. Maternal health is poor, with high maternal mortality rates due to inadequate access to health services. Access to basic education is also limited.
An influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring countries has put additional pressure on Chad’s already limited resources. In particular, refugees, displaced people and other poor communities in the Lake Chad basin are dependent on humanitarian assistance for survival.

LAKE CHAD
Coupled with the existing challenges of extreme poverty, underdevelopment and climate change in the Lake Chad region, Boko Haram violence has led to one of the most acute – and sorely neglected – humanitarian crises in the world.
Some 7.1 million people need food assistance across four countries (Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria) up from 3 million one year ago; as malnutrition rises to alarming levels in all four countries, over half a million children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Across the Lake Chad region, some 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. The majority have found shelter within host communities who were already among the poorest in the world. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) runs a variety of operations in Lake Chad, with focus gradually shifting from emergency relief to strengthening the country’s long-term resilience. In our mission to reduce food insecurity and malnutrition in Chad, we work alongside the Government other UN agencies and partners. WFP is providing nutritional support to vulnerable populations in the Lake Chad Region including through school meals initiatives, Blanket Supplementary Feeding,  cash-based transfers, Mother and Child Health and Nutrition (MCHN) support.
 FOOD FOR ASSETS
Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programmes can ensure lasting environmental benefits by reducing erosion and desertification, or improving soil condition. By increasing productivity and promoting sustainable agriculture, they strengthen and diversify incomes and livelihoods. They empower communities to work together and find their way out of hunger. FFA can also promote improved gender equality and women's empowerment, nutrition, protection, and climate change adaptation.
Seen through the lens of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FFA is a powerful tool in efforts to achieve Goal 2. FFA restores degraded landscapes, expands the availability and diversity of food produced and consumed locally, and ensures that local food production and income-generating activities can continue through shocks and crises. Partner governments can also benefit from an improved capacity for food security and nutrition policies, strategies and programmes.
In addition, due to the range of activities FFA includes, asset creation, combined with partners’ efforts, contributes to SDG Goal 5 on gender equality; Goal 6 on water and sanitation; Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production; Goal 13 on climate action; and Goal 15 (sustainable forest management, combating desertification, halting and reversing land degradation, and putting an end to biodiversity loss).

In the Photo: Rehabilitation of the daily run-off pond in Goumacherom village to protect fields from flooding and regulate adequate water supply to the crop fields.

Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
CHD_20170330_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 10941.00 kb

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