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"general food distribution": 1873 results 

 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6574 x 4383 px 55.66 x 37.11 cm 6148.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7056.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 9916.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 8345.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf. Smoke in Myanmar is seen from the Bangladeshi side of the border near Cox's Bazar on September 10, 2017. Thousands of homes, sometimes entire villages, are being burned in the ongoing conflict in Myanmar's Rakhine state.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 11464.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: Registration processing in general food distribution for new arrival at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6243 x 4162 px 52.86 x 35.24 cm 7181.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5023 x 3349 px 42.53 x 28.35 cm 3293.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7015.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7051.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 5768.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6131 x 4087 px 51.91 x 34.60 cm 6439.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugee at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7321.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7594.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugee at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 7902.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 8973.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugee at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6085 x 4057 px 51.52 x 34.35 cm 6122.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugee at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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3945 x 5918 px 33.40 x 50.11 cm 5212.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugee at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6593 x 4395 px 55.82 x 37.21 cm 7334.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: Queue in general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refuge at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 9385.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: Registration processing in general food distribution for new arrival at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: Registration processing in general food distribution for new arrival at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 8626.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: Registration processing in general food distribution for new arrival at Nayapara WFP food shop in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 9217.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5842 x 3895 px 49.46 x 32.98 cm 5808.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6374 x 4249 px 53.97 x 35.97 cm 7805.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Teknaf, 10 September 2017  Food distributions provide solace to people fleeing Myanmar violence  Taking only what they can carry, thousands of people are fleeing violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State and seeking shelter in the Bangladeshi border district of Cox’s Bazar. The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, estimatesthat about 270,000 peoople have sought safety in Bangladesh in the past two weeks. Unicef believes that up to 80 percent of them are women and children. They arrive at the already overcrowded camps, hungry and desperate, looking for somewhere to take shelter or at least to rest. WFP’s Deputy Country Director in Bangladesh, Dipayan Bhattacharyya, recently described the situation to Reuters, saying: “They are coming in nutritionally deprived, they have been cut off from a normal flow of food for possibly more than a month.”  WFP is giving new arrivals a supply of high-energy biscuits: a kind of cookie enriched with nutrients to cover immediate emergency needs. WFP is also supplying rice to community kitchens run by Action Contre la Faim (ACF), where people can get a hot meal of khichuri: a kind of rice and lentil porridge.  WFP is especially concerned about the health of women arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move. WFP is giving a special, high-nutrient porridge made of wheat and soya flour to malnourished women who are breastfeeding or pregnant, and to children under the age of five.  WFP plans to continue providing high-energy biscuits to families as they arrive, followed by 50 kg of rice per month for four months. The food for new arrivals comes on top of assistance that WFP provides to 34,000 registered refugees living in ‘official’ camps, through e-vouchers. Another 72,500 undocumented people living in makeshift camps, who arrived after the last outbreak of violence in October 2016, receive rice and nutrition support.  In the Photo: general food distribution for new arrival Rohingya refugees at Nayapara WFP food distribution point in Teknaf, Chittagong division.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6235 x 4157 px 52.79 x 35.20 cm 10105.00 kb

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