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"livelihoods": 6820 results 

 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: women lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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3960 x 2640 px 139.70 x 93.13 cm 4297.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: a woman lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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3750 x 2500 px 132.29 x 88.19 cm 6351.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: a smiling woman lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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2985 x 1990 px 105.30 x 70.20 cm 3734.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Fanna lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. Fanna, from Rann, lives with her husband and their 8 kids and 2 grandsons. She tells that life in town has become tough as IDPs have moved in, people have shared their food with them. They have also tried to farm, but harvest has not been good, and Boko Haram has looted some foods. “All I am dreaming about is for us to have peaceful times, to be able to do some farming and a little trading, too.”   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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3960 x 2640 px 139.70 x 93.13 cm 5743.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Mallam Modu Alhaji Budul lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. Mallam Modu Alhaji Budul with 3 wives and 15 kids, have been in Rann for 2 years ad 5 months.  Mallam used to be a farmer at home, and now has also been farming a little in Rann but it felt better at home.  “It is not easy to live here without doing anything. Now I can farm more, but I am not sure it will be enough.”   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 9628.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Sarah (Left) with WFP livelihood officer (Right) at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Sarah has been in Rann for three years, has two children, 3 & 1 years old. Living with her parents and siplings. Looking forward to farm. They had much more land in their old home, here is it a little plot only for her and the parents to farm.  “I am looking forward to plant and later to harvest. It will happen very soon.”  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 12080.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Sarah (center) with WFP livelihood officer (Left), and FAO agriculture advisor (Right) at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Sarah has been in Rann for three years, has two children, 3 & 1 years old. Living with her parents and siplings. Looking forward to farm. They had much more land in their old home, here is it a little plot only for her and the parents to farm.  “I am looking forward to plant and later to harvest. It will happen very soon.”  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
NIR_20180706_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5737.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Sarah lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Sarah has been in Rann for three years, has two children, 3 & 1 years old. Living with her parents and siplings. Looking forward to farm. They had much more land in their old home, here is it a little plot only for her and the parents to farm.  “I am looking forward to plant and later to harvest. It will happen very soon.”  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
NIR_20180706_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 9596.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: a smiling woman lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 12875.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
NIR_20180706_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 14903.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds. Donkey carts waiting to assist families picking up WFP food and FAO seeds  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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3960 x 2640 px 139.70 x 93.13 cm 6342.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: women lining up at the WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 13026.00 kb
 
North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds. Donkey carts waiting to assist families picking up WFP food and FAO seeds  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds. If food is dropped on the ground, women will sift it, to separate sand from grains.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations in the back, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: WFP-FAO distribution in Rann camp, Borno State, North-eastern Nigeria. WFP is getting ready to distribute month food rations, while FAO staff is preparing distribution of seeds.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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North-eastern Nigeria, Rann, Borno State,  05 July 2018  Rann, Borno State town of 20,000 people, now houses 70,000 people, as Nigerians fleeing conflict have taken refuge in this remote northeastern town. Rann is one of the localities in north-eastern Nigeria that have recently become accessible to humanitarian organizations. Emergency assistance is gradually being ramped up in areas that were previously unreachable.  WFP is distributing food rations to all families in Rann every month.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa (BAY) states in northeast Nigeria, non-state armed groups violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods  of  millions  of  people.  Due to conflict, 1.9 million people are displaced, and around 3 million  people  are  food  insecure,  many  depending  entirely  on  food  assistance  for  survival.  The World  Food  Programme  (WFP)  uses  either  food  or  –  where  functional  markets  exist  -  cash  transfers  to  support  displaced  people  living  in  camps  or  in  host  communities  as  well  as  vulnerable  host  populations.   On average,  WFP  supports  1.2  million  people  every  month  (other  food  actors  cover  just  over  one  million  people  a  month).     The World Food  Programme  (WFP)  also  provides  specialized  nutritious  food  to  young  children  (6  –  59  months)  and  to  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  prevent  malnutrition.  Start of joint distribution between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) today in Rann, Borno State, Northeast Nigeria. In the large-scale joint distribution for the main planting season, both FAO and WFP supports families into a push for self-reliance. There are no cars, no electricity or internet connectivity in town. All roads are dirt roads and the conflict affected people rely on their donkey carts for transport, including pushing the food rations and seeds they receive from FAO and WFP home.  Their livelihood had been taken away by ongoing conflict forcing them to rely on food aid, a season that prompted WFP and FAO to come together to return them back to their normal lives of farming as situation is improving harvests.  In the Photo: Aerial view of Rann. Farmers can only access land 5-10 kilometers around Rann.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s warehouse and packaging facility in Homs.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s warehouse and packaging facility in Homs.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP-implemented livelihoods tunnel-farming project.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP flag flies on a car (not seen) parked in front of a WFP-implemented Livelihoods tunnel-farming field project.  Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5176.00 kb
 
Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s CMAM clinic in Homs. To address acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months old and pregnant and nursing women, WFP in partnership with UNICEF and WHO, and in close coordination with the Ministry of Health, is implementing a Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programme. WFP supports treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition through provision of specialized lipid based nutrient supplements (LNS). Activities including community outreach and awareness are provided with the assistance of government and NGO partners. UNICEF and WHO support the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition.   Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s CMAM clinic in Homs. To address acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months old and pregnant and nursing women, WFP in partnership with UNICEF and WHO, and in close coordination with the Ministry of Health, is implementing a Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programme. WFP supports treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition through provision of specialized lipid based nutrient supplements (LNS). Activities including community outreach and awareness are provided with the assistance of government and NGO partners. UNICEF and WHO support the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition.   Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s CMAM clinic in Homs. To address acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months old and pregnant and nursing women, WFP in partnership with UNICEF and WHO, and in close coordination with the Ministry of Health, is implementing a Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programme. WFP supports treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition through provision of specialized lipid based nutrient supplements (LNS). Activities including community outreach and awareness are provided with the assistance of government and NGO partners. UNICEF and WHO support the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition.   Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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3840 x 5760 px 135.47 x 203.20 cm 5981.00 kb
 
Syria, Homs, 05 June 2018  The ongoing conflict in Syria has resulted in a devastating humanitarian crisis, creating major displacement, damage to vital infrastructure and an increase in people’s vulnerabilities and poverty levels. Syria has lost four decades of human development gains and many families have fallen into extreme poverty since the onset of the conflict.  Not only has the conflict had a major humanitarian impact on Syria’s population, but it has also drastically eroded livelihoods and caused increased levels of poverty, unemployment, recurrent displacement, loss of assets and weakened social protection schemes. Losses across all sectors have resulted in unemployment rates reaching up to 75 percent among youth, leading to an increasing number of people migrating to seek livelihoods. 69 percent of the Syrian population are estimated to live in extreme poverty (less than USD 1.90 a day).  WFP is increasing its support for long-term recovery by focusing on livelihoods, nutrition and improving access to primary education through school meals and vouchers. Currently, WFP is implementing livelihoods and income generating activities in food production as well as vocational training that has benefited more than 200,000 people across ten governorates. The projects include kitchen gardens, poultry, farming, and food processing.  In the Photo: a WFP’s CMAM clinic in Homs. To address acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months old and pregnant and nursing women, WFP in partnership with UNICEF and WHO, and in close coordination with the Ministry of Health, is implementing a Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programme. WFP supports treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition through provision of specialized lipid based nutrient supplements (LNS). Activities including community outreach and awareness are provided with the assistance of government and NGO partners. UNICEF and WHO support the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition.   Photo: WFP/Marwa Awad
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5102.00 kb

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