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Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5954 x 3969 px 210.04 x 140.02 cm 6873.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6505.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9275.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5975 x 3983 px 210.78 x 140.51 cm 7087.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5957 x 3971 px 210.15 x 140.09 cm 5631.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6240 x 4160 px 220.13 x 146.76 cm 7437.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5508 x 3672 px 194.31 x 129.54 cm 3927.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6005.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 5436.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria), 25 April 2018  In the Photo: Adham Effendi, WFP Head of Logistics explaining how WFP food is transferred from trucks arriving in Juba from outside South Sudan to trucks transporting the food to various locations inside the country.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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Google Maps
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar. 18 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: US Senator Sam Brownback (center-ledt partially visibile) visited Cox’s Bazar as part of his trip to Bangladesh. Stefano Peveri, WFP Senior Supply Chain Officer (center) facilitating the visit.  Photo: WFP/Shelley Thakral
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Google Maps
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar. 18 April 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Upon arrival, people receive high energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil.  In the Photo: US Senator Sam Brownback (center) visited Cox’s Bazar as part of his trip to Bangladesh. Stefano Peveri, WFP Senior Supply Chain Officer (center-left) facilitating the visit.  Photo: WFP/Shelley Thakral
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State. 13 April 2018.  In Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states in northeast Nigeria, Boko Haram violence is affecting the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Over 5 million people are facing hunger and 450,000 children are severely malnourished.  WFP uses either food or cash transfers to support displaced people living in camps or with host communities, as well as vulnerable host populations. The World Food Programme also assists with specialized nutritious food children under 5 at risk of malnutrition, and pregnant and nursing women.  In the Photo: WFP warehouse in Maiduguri. On a daily basis trucks are loaded and dispatched from the warehouse carrying food for conflict affected families throughout Nigeria’s three North Eastern States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. 
Up to three million people are at risk of food insecurity in the coming lean season. Many partners, including the government of Nigeria, are involved in providing food assistance in the NE. WFP is currently assisting around 1.2 million people a month, and will upscale its assistance to around 1,5 million people to support vulnerable families through the lean/planting/rainy season.   Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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