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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 03 August 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: the 28 cubic meter refrigerated container  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2619.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 03 August 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Four of the eight fridges storing Oxytocin, a life-saving medicine  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2469.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato (right)showing some of the cooler boxes, essential to contribute to save lives in the field  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20180727_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2989.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the cooler boxes, essential to contribute to save lives in the field  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20180727_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2308.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20180727_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 3138.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20180727_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2614.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Goma, North Kivu province, 27 July 2018  In Goma, North Kivu province, the World Food Programme (WFP)’s cold chain is providing humanitarian partners with a facility that holds life- saving, cold seal medication.  As the experts in supply chain and logistics, WFP offers a variety of services to the humanitarian community, ranging from land and air transportation to the storage of essential household items. Towards the end of 2016, the humanitarian family expressed the need for a facility to store cold seal medications. So, it was built. We visited this brand new cold chain in North Kivu, in the company of doctor N’sindi Bwato, a United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supply chain expert.  “We were already using WFP warehousing services to store pharmaceuticals and medical equipment. Since the cold chain opened, we have been able to stock and store our temperature sensitive products such as oxytocin, blood tests and syphilis tests in optimal conditions,” says Doctor Bwato.  Oxytocin is a drug that saves hundreds of lives every day because it is used to stop bleeding during childbirth — the main cause of maternal mortality in Africa. This medication requires refrigeration, and must be stored between 2 and 8° C; otherwise it loses its specific properties. Thanks to WFP’s cold chain, this medication along with other medicines, are being stored and distributed free of charge to 67 locations in eastern DRC.  Cold chain is critical for UNFPA, so that it can reduce maternal deaths and deliver access to quality reproductive health services in the country.  Electricity in Goma is unreliable, so establishing a cold chain facility at a reasonable cost was a major challenge. Eight fridges, a freezer and a massive refrigerated container need round-the-clock power. Two generators take turns doing this, while feeding six batteries to help reduce fuel expenses. In order to offer a complete cold chain, WFP has 16 cooler boxes with cold accumulators offering a 24 to 72 hour cooling efficiency — essential for field operations.  Behind a complex technical system, the health of individuals is at stake. Everything is conceived down to the latest details to ensure the optimum quality that humanitarian actors need to store their products and run their operations. WFP’s cold chain service is based on a cost-recovery process in order to provide the most professional service possible.  “Although we don’t have the same mandate, it’s important that UN agencies support each other to achieve specific objectives. WFP provides a vital service, allowing UNFPA to focus on ensuring that no woman dies while giving life,” says Doctor Bwato.  In the Photo: Doctpr Bwato showing some of the Oxytocin, syphilis and blood tests stocked in the fridge by UNFPA  Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20180727_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 2874.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 25 July 2018  The port of Hodeidah is Yemen’s lifeline and the only way that food and fuel get into the country. Yemen imports 90 percent of its food needs.  In the Photo: Stephen Anderson, WFP Yemen Representative and Country Director visiting the Hodeidah Port.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3179.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 25 July 2018  The port of Hodeidah is Yemen’s lifeline and the only way that food and fuel get into the country. Yemen imports 90 percent of its food needs.  In the Photo: Stephen Anderson, WFP Yemen Representative and Country Director visiting the Hodeidah Port.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 3533.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  In the Photo: Nurul Haque (28). “My name is Mohammad Nurul Haque Nuru, I am 28 years old. I live in Moricha, we are five brothers and three sisters. From the very beginning, when the influx started, I am involved with WFP to transport all the food items to people.   What have you witnessed at the beginning of the influx? How did it impact you?  When the Rohingyas started to come, in the early September, people who have witnessed everything; they know how the refugees came, how hungry they were—their lamentation. They were sitting beside the streets, lamenting and waiting for food. They were all sitting on the streets, they didn’t have any place to sat or eat their food, they were begging for food. Watching them, we could realize, how it might feel while starving, how a hungry person acts like. They had nothing, they were all drenched in rain waiting for food and shelter, wailing. How much they have suffered that they flew here, requires no explanation. My heart kept weeping for their miseries, I tried to help them as much as I could.   Once they came here, after lamenting for days, when WFP started to give them food, then I also joined to distribute WFP’s food item. When WFP was giving them food, I was there, from my side, I tried my best to help running the distribution properly. I drove the truck, and transport all the items, to save lives, and after seeing this, I feel so happy. After influx, people were starving for days, when WFP started to distribute food, I got the chance to be involved with WFP logistics to deliver the foods as a driver. From my side, I tried my best to help running the distribution properly. After getting the foods from WFP, many lives were saved from death, specially the children’s. Till now, when I transport the foods to them and see that no one is starving, I feel so content and proud. “  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6480.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5989 x 3993 px 211.28 x 140.86 cm 6593.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180710_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 7614.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 10 July 2018  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: men organizing WFP food for new arrival Rohingya refugees at the WFP food logistic sector at Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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5863 x 3909 px 206.83 x 137.90 cm 5293.00 kb
 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1822.00 kb
 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
UNHRD_20180706....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1667.00 kb
 
Italy, (San Vito dei Normanni) Brindisi, 6 July 2018  The UN World Food Programme’s Executive Director, David Beasley, visited the UN Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD), located in the former USAF Base of San Vito dei Normanni, in Brindisi. It is his first visit at the Base since he arrived at the helm of the UN agency. The Brindisi base was the first one to be created among the 6 Bases that, located in various continents, all together make up the UNHRD Network.  “The world now has deeper and more complex humanitarian emergencies because of the vicious intersection of conflict and hunger. To save lives, we need effective partners to help us respond quickly and efficiently. The Brindisi Base has led the way, creating an operative model that continues to get the job done for us, and more importantly, for hungry people everywhere,” said David Beasley.  The visit to the exhibition areas, to the warehouses and to the UNHRD lab was compounded by a simulation where prefab were assembled in record time, as an example of what it means operating in emergencies and crisis situations.   In the Photo: WFP Executive Director David Beasley visiting UNHRD base in Brindisi: ‘a model for the international community’.  Photo: WFP/Antonio Tedesco
UNHRD_20180706....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 1302.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20180628_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4585.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4299.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3894.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4273.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3768.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 4231.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  In the Photo: WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck. “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”    Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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8256 x 5504 px 291.25 x 194.17 cm 3721.00 kb
 
Uganda, Lake Victoria, 28 June 2018  WFP’s Global Fleet team has introduced a pioneering new vehicle to its Supply Chain – to make sure life-saving food gets to communities in the hardest-to-reach places and most challenging of circumstances.  Nenad Grkovic, WFP Global Fleet Manager said: “We are working in places that are very hard-to-reach because of floods and heavy rains – so WFP decided to innovate and use these new trucks to ensure we can help these families to survive during these hard times.”  SHERP All-Terrain Vehicles are designed to cope with the toughest road conditions and can easily overcome any obstacle in its way, float and move out of the water – so it can offer a more direct and cost-effective solution than helicopter airdrops. WFP plans to deploy the SHERP vehicles to make last mile deliveries of its nutritious food commodities through inaccessible roads to reach vulnerable and stranded communities.  The vehicles can hold 1.2 tonnes of food and has very low fuel consumption and can travel for around 500-600Kms on a full tank. WFP estimates the SHERP will cut transport costs significantly too – at 200 USD per metric ton instead of using helicopters at 4,000 USD per metric ton.  “The potential of these vehicles for WFP and other humanitarian actors is amazing,” continues Nenad, “by giving us access to beneficiaries in natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis – this could be a new life-saving innovation in WFP’s Supply Chain.”  The trucks will initially be used in the East and Central African region – with three being deployed to South Sudan and three to Democratic Republic of Congo. In June, WFP’s Global Fleet, Regional Bureau Nairobi and the Uganda Country Office simulated a testing ground for the new All-Terrain Vehicle to see its potential to make challenging last mile deliveries. SHERP trained WFP drivers from South Sudan and global fleet managers on operating the vehicles – through the shores of Uganda’s Lake Victoria.  “This vehicle is going to help us a lot,” says Richard Gama, a driver from South Sudan who was trained to drive the SHERP vehicle. Richard has been a driver with WFP South Sudan for the past 12 years, delivering food in areas such as Bor and around Malakal. “Sometimes we can’t pass and get the food across to the people, they have to cross the swamps to come and get the food from us – as our vehicles can’t pass.”  In the Photo: Constantine Spivakov (left) from SHERP and Richard Gama (right), WFP driver from South Sudan during the WFP test drive the amphibious all terrain truck.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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