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"market analysis": 30 results 

 
Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a Yemeni man receives her WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160414_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8178.00 kb
 
Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman receives her WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160414_W....JPG
3304 x 3840 px 116.56 x 135.47 cm 6865.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee checks cards as people wait to receive WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5525 x 3659 px 194.91 x 129.08 cm 12232.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee checks cards as people wait to receive WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5529 x 3647 px 195.05 x 128.66 cm 8350.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee checks cards as people wait to receive WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5388 x 3711 px 190.08 x 130.92 cm 10241.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: employees hand WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
3400 x 2509 px 119.94 x 88.51 cm 3421.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee checks cards as women wait to receive WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6031.00 kb
 
Yemen, 'Amran, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee checks cards as women wait to receive WFP food rations outside a center for food distribution in 'Amran.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6134.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: Yemenis queue to receive their food ration cards before collecting WFP food items outside a center used to hand in food cards in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 10182.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: employees collect an WFP food ration to hand it to a family at food distribution center in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5441 x 3743 px 191.95 x 132.04 cm 8784.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee hand a WFP food ration to a family at a center used to hand WFP food rations in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 9127.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee hand a WFP food ration to a family at a center used to hand WFP food rations in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 9197.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: Yemenis carry their WFP food ration on their motorcycle as they leave a food distribution center in Hajja.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5267 x 3544 px 185.81 x 125.02 cm 8119.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee hand a WFP food ration to a family at a center used to hand WFP food rations in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5666 x 3840 px 199.88 x 135.47 cm 11261.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: an employee hand a WFP food ration to a family at a center used to hand WFP food rations in Hajja city where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5142 x 3840 px 181.40 x 135.47 cm 18471.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: Yemenis queue to receive their WFP food rations card at a center used for collecting food cards in Hajja, where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8792.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hajja, 21 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: Yemenis queue to search for their names to receive their WFP food rations card at a center used for collecting food cards in Hajja, where many displaced Yemenis live.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160421_W....JPG
5120 x 3548 px 180.62 x 125.17 cm 8346.00 kb
 
Yemen, Saada (Sa'ada), 18 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a large shipment of food arrives at the World Food Programme Warehouse in the northern Yemeni city of Saada (Sa'ada); workers are needed to offload the bags of wheat meal and the boxes of Palmolein Oil from the trucks.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160418_W....JPG
4370 x 3010 px 154.16 x 106.19 cm 5836.00 kb
 
Yemen, Saada (Sa'ada), 18 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a large shipment of food arrives at the World Food Programme Warehouse in the northern Yemeni city of Saada (Sa'ada); workers are needed to offload the bags of Yellow Split Peas and the boxes of Palmolein Oil from the trucks.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
YEM_20160418_W....JPG
3751 x 2535 px 132.33 x 89.43 cm 4436.00 kb
 
Yemen, Saada (Sa'ada), 18 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a large shipment of food arrives at the World Food Programme Warehouse in the northern Yemeni city of Saada (Sa'ada); workers are needed to offload the bags of Yellow Split Peas and the boxes of Palmolein Oil from the trucks.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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3993 x 2794 px 140.86 x 98.57 cm 5090.00 kb
 
Yemen, Saada (Sa'ada), 18 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a large shipment of food arrives at the World Food Programme Warehouse in the northern Yemeni city of Saada (Sa'ada); workers are needed to offload the bags of Yellow Split Peas and the boxes of Palmolein Oil from the trucks.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a Yemeni man receives her WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: Yemenis queue to receive their WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman receives her WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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Yemen, Sanaa (Sana'a), 14 April 2016  In Yemen, millions of people are on the brink of famine. The lack of immediate and unhindered access to people who urgently need food assistance – compounded by a shortage of funding – means that famine is a possibility for millions of people, mostly women and children who are already hungry in this war-torn country.  Almost 14.4 million people in Yemen are food insecure. This includes more than seven million people in desperate need of food assistance; that is one in five of the country’s population. Yemen has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition in the world and now an estimated 1 in 5 people are “severely food insecure” and in urgent need of food assistance.  The nutrition situation continues to deteriorate. According to WFP market analysis, prices of food items spiked in September as a result of the escalation of the conflict. The national average price of wheat flour last month was 55 percent higher compared to the pre-crisis period.   Humanitarian organizations need to be able to move freely and safely to provide assistance to reach all those in urgent need before they fall deeper into crisis.  In March, WFP reached a total of over 3 million people in 17 governorates with emergency food assistance. Nine of those governorates are in the grip of severe food insecurity at ‘Emergency’ level – one step below famine on the five-point Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale.  In the Photo: a Yemeni man receives her WFP food vouchers in a school used as distribution site in Sanaa.  Photo: WFP/Asmaa Waguih
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